The Birth of Our Planets
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20-12-2014, 02:45 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 02:33 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(20-12-2014 01:17 PM)Free Wrote:  Meh, it's just a hypothesis.

I kinda based it upon the larger planets being in closer proximity to each other. If a collision occurred, the bulk of the two colliding rocks would be where Saturn and Jupiter are. Other rock fragments from the collision could have formed the other planets.

I'm thinking that what is currently Saturn was the far larger rock originally, and it's collision with what is now Jupiter caused the larger fragments of what we call Uranus and Neptune, placing them behind the orbit of Saturn, as a collision could suggest such a scenario.

Except those planets are not in close proximity to one another. And they are gas giants - that is mostly gas with a very small rocky core.

Well they are not close to each other anymore, since a collision could have sent them in different directions. We don't really know yet how big or small the rocky core is.

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20-12-2014, 03:11 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 02:45 PM)Free Wrote:  
(20-12-2014 02:33 PM)Chas Wrote:  Except those planets are not in close proximity to one another. And they are gas giants - that is mostly gas with a very small rocky core.

Well they are not close to each other anymore, since a collision could have sent them in different directions. We don't really know yet how big or small the rocky core is.

Well, one could read the article. Drinking Beverage

"Jupiter and Saturn consist mostly of hydrogen and helium, with heavier elements making up between 3 and 13 percent of the mass."

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20-12-2014, 03:16 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 03:11 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(20-12-2014 02:45 PM)Free Wrote:  Well they are not close to each other anymore, since a collision could have sent them in different directions. We don't really know yet how big or small the rocky core is.

Well, one could read the article. Drinking Beverage

"Jupiter and Saturn consist mostly of hydrogen and helium, with heavier elements making up between 3 and 13 percent of the mass."

I found this article on Jupiter to be more elaborate.

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20-12-2014, 04:28 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 02:31 PM)Free Wrote:  My feeling is there is something solid beneath that gas.
Your feeling is based on....

...A confirmation bias in support of your "hypothesis" that the other planets are as a result of a collision involving Saturn.


You choose Saturn because you think it is pretty and would make for a terrific story?

You've said
Quote:With Saturn being the epicenter it may explain those rings.

But Saturn isn't the only planet with rings:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rings_of_Jupiter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rings_of_Uranus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rings_of_Neptune

That's half of our planets.

Why did you pick Saturn?
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20-12-2014, 04:40 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 04:28 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(20-12-2014 02:31 PM)Free Wrote:  My feeling is there is something solid beneath that gas.
Your feeling is based on....

...A confirmation bias in support of your "hypothesis" that the other planets are as a result of a collision involving Saturn.


You choose Saturn because you think it is pretty and would make for a terrific story?

You've said
Quote:With Saturn being the epicenter it may explain those rings.

But Saturn isn't the only planet with rings:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rings_of_Jupiter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rings_of_Uranus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rings_of_Neptune

That's half of our planets.

Why did you pick Saturn?

The rings of Saturn are more pronounced, and it's dead in the middle of all the others.

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20-12-2014, 05:08 PM
RE: The Birth of Our Planets
(20-12-2014 04:40 PM)Free Wrote:  The rings of Saturn are more pronounced, and it's dead in the middle of all the others.
Did you know that they have a hypothesis that the moon came from a collision with Earth. They substantiate their claim by pointing to various evidence.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_impact_hypothesis
Quote:Supporting evidence includes the Earth's spin and Moon's orbit having similar orientations,[4] Moon samples indicating the surface of the Moon was once molten, the Moon's relatively small iron core, lower density compared to the Earth, evidence of similar collisions in other star systems (that result in debris disks), and that giant collisions are consistent with the leading theories of the formation of the solar system. Finally, the stable isotope ratios of lunar and terrestrial rock are identical, implying a common origin

Here is another interesting link which talks about rocky planets and giant planet formation out of a nebulous.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nebular_hypothesis
Quote:According to the solar nebular disk model, rocky planets form in the inner part of the protoplanetary disk, within the frost line, where the temperature is high enough to prevent condensation of water ice and other substances into grains.[47] This results in coagulation of purely rocky grains and later in the formation of rocky planetesimals.[c][47] Such conditions are thought to exist in the inner 3–4 AU part of the disk of a sun-like star.

Quote:Giant planet core formation is thought to proceed roughly along the lines of the terrestrial planet formation.[13] It starts with planetesimals that undergo runaway growth, followed by the slower oligarchic stage.[48] Hypotheses do not predict a merger stage, due to the low probability of collisions between planetary embryos in the outer part of planetary systems
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