The Depression/Anxiety Thread
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08-10-2015, 12:06 AM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(07-10-2015 11:39 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  
(07-10-2015 11:36 PM)jennybee Wrote:  I understand that, and I'm sure it's not an easy thing to do, but it could be an opportunity for a better life if you get help.

Could be but does not work for everyone.

... Er... don't be defeatist old bean Wink You can definitely beat the SAD thing, or mitigate it. I was that kind of a guy once, and I pulled through. Basically the thing to realise is that socialising is a skill that can be learned. I'm pretty introverted myself but nowadays I can go into a social situation without fear.

I used to always worry that I'd "fuck up" by revealing myself not to be the perfect human that everyone (in my mind) thought I should be. I used to stress about social situations because no one can avoid such things entirely. I'd worry that I'd be seen as the weird kid 'cos I wasn't talking to anyone and then I'd *be* the weird kid 'cos I would either try and introduce myself and be so awkward that things didn't work out, or I'd be so scared of appearing awkward that I'd not bother to introduce myself.

I can't explain how to get away from that mindset easily, it was a long process for me, but it is possible and ja, therapy is possibly a good option. It took me years 'cos I was too proud to go see a therapist, maybe you might save yourself some wandering in the desert Wink

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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08-10-2015, 12:09 AM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(08-10-2015 12:06 AM)morondog Wrote:  
(07-10-2015 11:39 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  Could be but does not work for everyone.

... Er... don't be defeatist old bean Wink You can definitely beat the SAD thing, or mitigate it. I was that kind of a guy once, and I pulled through. Basically the thing to realise is that socialising is a skill that can be learned. I'm pretty introverted myself but nowadays I can go into a social situation without fear.

I used to always worry that I'd "fuck up" by revealing myself not to be the perfect human that everyone (in my mind) thought I should be. I used to stress about social situations because no one can avoid such things entirely. I'd worry that I'd be seen as the weird kid 'cos I wasn't talking to anyone and then I'd *be* the weird kid 'cos I would either try and introduce myself and be so awkward that things didn't work out, or I'd be so scared of appearing awkward that I'd not bother to introduce myself.

I can't explain how to get away from that mindset easily, it was a long process for me, but it is possible and ja, therapy is possibly a good option. It took me years 'cos I was too proud to go see a therapist, maybe you might save yourself some wandering in the desert Wink

Not saying it can't help, just that everyone is different and it may not help everyone. Some may find comfort and success in other treatments.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
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08-10-2015, 02:59 AM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(08-10-2015 12:09 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  Some may find comfort and success in other treatments.

Indeed, but you gotta start somewhere. MOVE! Don't stay still.

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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08-10-2015, 03:06 AM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(08-10-2015 02:59 AM)morondog Wrote:  
(08-10-2015 12:09 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  Some may find comfort and success in other treatments.

Indeed, but you gotta start somewhere. MOVE! Don't stay still.

The bills may scare some people unless they have insurance but yeah, though it didn't do crap or me, better to start somewhere than nowhere.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
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08-10-2015, 04:01 AM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(08-10-2015 03:06 AM)JDog554 Wrote:  
(08-10-2015 02:59 AM)morondog Wrote:  Indeed, but you gotta start somewhere. MOVE! Don't stay still.

The bills may scare some people unless they have insurance but yeah, though it didn't do crap or me, better to start somewhere than nowhere.

Well then you can be depressed about something different, instead of being depressed about social anxiety you can be depressed that you can't afford to pay your therapist Smartass

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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19-10-2015, 02:59 PM (This post was last modified: 19-10-2015 03:18 PM by Mark Fulton.)
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
Hi everyone, I have 20 years experience treating mental illness. I suggest the following may be life changing for many people...

The following is from “Nutrient Power” by William J. Walsh, phD. He classified depressed patients into 5 biotypes….

( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyoPtGtQvHI )

1. Undermethylation Biotype. 38%

(https://www.corepsych.com/2014/09/depres...hylation/)

The largest group of depressives is the under¬methylation biotype, which includes between 38 and 40 percent of all people diagnosed with clinical depression—based on the 3,600 cases they have studied. In many cases, this condition is genetic, not epigenetic. It can be aggravated by the environment, but often these people are born with a tendency for depression. Undermethylation is treatable, but it is the most difficult biotype of depression to treat. It usually takes at least a month for people to feel any better, and often six months for the nutrient therapy to achieve its full effect. Our success rate is probably 65 to 70 percent with this form of depression.


These patients exhibit classic symptoms of low serotonin and report improved mood after serotonin enhancing SSRI Medications.

They thrive on SAME (S adenosyl methionine), and the amino acid methionine.

They are strikingly intolerant to folates.

They have a whole blood histamine level above 70 ng/ml. (test available through S and N, but not QML - these are Australian pathology companies.

There is no simple direct test to sell how well the methylation process is working. Professor Pfeiffer and expert in this field considers basophil counts greater than 50 cells/cu mm and histamine levels greater than 70 ng/ml (0.629umol/L) a reliable diagnostic tool for diagnosing undermethylation. High homocysteine levels also indicate undermethylation.

The first treatment involves a combination of nutrients. These include methylcobalamin (methyl-B12), methylfolate (5-MTHF) and pyridoxyl-5-phosphate (P5P). If adding methyl B’s cause you to over methylate, taking time-released Niacin, 50 mg, or reducing the dose can slow it down. Symptoms of overmethylation can include muscle pain or headaches, fatigue, insomnia, irritability or anxiety. If you have inflammation taking 5-MTHF can make it worse so supplements such as curcumin and Krill oil may be necessary to help overcome the inflammation.


A methyl donor such as Methionione, Trimethylglycine or SAMe should also be used however start with lower doses and ramp it up gradually to avoid overmethylating which can make things worse in some people. Glutathione may also be supplemented to help increase low levels.

Histadelia (high histamine)
seasonal allergies
pruritus
excessive stomach acid production and hence gastritis and ulcers
vasomotor rhinitis (runny nose),
hyperactivity disorder,
obsessive-compulsive disorder,
phobias,
headaches (because of brain vessels dilation
oppositional-defiant disorder
depression
suicidal thoughts
profuse sweating and salivation
adrenal exhaustion
premature ejaculations

They often have OCD, seasonal allergies, and a history of perfectionism, headaches and a high libido. They are prone to suicide, denial of depression, and ruminating about the past.

Avoid giving folate (vitamin b9), choline and pantothenic acid (B5), Manganese and copper.

A high percentage of these patients have low stores of
calcium,
vitamin D and
magnesium,
so they should thrive on supplements of these nutrients.

They should also be given
tryptophan,
serine,
vitamin B6 and
five hydroxytryptophan.

They do well with
vitamins A,
C,
and E
and chromium.

A significant number of under methylated depression patients exhibit some degree of pyrrole disorder. Since both under methylation and pyrrole disorder are associated with low serotonin activity, depression is usually more severe in these cases and suicidal thoughts are more common.

Most have low levels of homocysteine, but some are high

These patients often have an innate tendency for non-compliance with any medical treatment. And they have a tendency to deny depression, even when the problem is severe.

They often have sparse hair

Undermethylation Treatment Response Time
Expect little/no improvement during the first three to four weeks, followed by steady improvement during months two to six.

2. Folate deficiency Biotype. 20%. "Overmethylators"

(https://www.corepsych.com/2014/09/overme...on-walsh/)

These patients have elevated serotonin and dopamine activity and intolerance to SSRI medications…which often make them worse. It is sensible to check folate levels before prescribing an SSRI medication.

They often report anxiety in addition to anhedonia. Many of them have chemical and food sensitivities. Despite the suffering, this group often contains a surprisingly high number of caring, generous persons with a history of volunteer work, and they probably are wonderful neighbours. The incidence of ADHD and academic underachievement (sometimes despite high IQ) is about three times higher than that observed for the under methylated biotype.

They often have high artistic abilities and interest, often are hyperactive and sometimes have upper body-head-neck pain. They are frequently intolerant to oestrogen.

May have thicker hair

There is often a history of underachievement in school.

There are whole blood histamine level is below 40 ng/ml. They have a low serum folate and an absolute basophil count below 30.

Symptoms of Histapenia (low histamine):
sexual response problems and troubles achieving orgasm,
paranoia and hallucinations in younger patients,
depression in older patients
schizophrenia
mouth ulcers
allergies
excessive body hair growth
headaches
tinnitus (ear ringing)
difficulties with eye and ear function

Nutrient therapy is focused on building up
folate stores, either with folate, or folinic acid which crosses the blood brain barrier a little easier
giving vitamin B12,
niacinamide (B3),
choline,
manganese,
zinc,
PLP,
vitamin B6,
Vitamin C and
vitamin E.
GABA may also be given.

It is best to avoid supplements of tryptophan, 5-HT, phenylalanine, tyrosine and copper.

Folinic acid may be preferable to giving them folate.

Overmethylation Treatment Response Time…

Increased anxiety for the first 2-3 weeks, followed by sharp improvement in 4-8 weeks and significant effectiveness in 3-4 months.

3. High copper patients…17%

These patients have a strong tendency for reduced dopamine and elevated noradrenaline activity.

96% of these patients are women.

The first episode of depression typically occurs during a hormonal event such as puberty, childbirth or menopause. In addition to the depression, characteristic symptoms include severe anxiety, sleep disorder, paranoia, hormone imbalances, hyperactivity and childhood, skin sensitivity to metals and rough fabrics, tinnitus and intolerance to oestrogen, shellfish and chocolate.

SSRIs often improve anhedonia but worsen anxiety. Benzodiazepines often work for anxiety.

These people are often intolerant of the pill and HRT

A straightforward way to treat persons with this depression biotype is to decopper them and to bring blood and brain copper levels into the normal range. This can usually be achieved within 60 days using nutrient therapy. A primary natural mechanism for removal of excess copper involves binding to metalothionein proteins in the liver, followed by excretion via the bile duct. The genetic expression of metallothionein proteins is dependent on zinc, and this trace metal is usually depleted in high copper persons. So we use supplements of zinc, together with
manganese,
glutathione,
Vitamin C,
Vitamin B6
Vitamin E.

This therapy must be introduced gradually to avoid sudden release of excess copper into blood that could cause a temporary worsening of depression and anxiety. Patients taking medications should continue them during the initial 2 to 3 months of mixing therapy.

However, more than 85% of high copper patients report that psychiatric medication can eventually be eliminated without the return of depression.

Elevated serum copper is exhibited by most women with a history of postpartum depression (PPD). Moreover, the classic symptoms of PPD are consistent with elevated noradrenaline and depleted dopamine that can result from copper overload. Women with PPD have significantly elevated serum copper when compared with depressed women without a history of PPD. PPD is a condition occurring in the postnatal period that is characterized by depressed mood, lack of energy, disruptions of sleep, high anxiety, reduced interest in previously enjoyable activities, and in severe cases suicidal ideation. Most women experience mild depressive symptoms soon after childbirth, and 10 to 20%will experience a full blown depressive episode. Normal pregnancies involve greatly increased levels of oestrogens and copper in blood.

During the nine months of a normal pregnancy serum copper typically doubles from about 110 mcg/dL to about 220 mcg/dL. This additional copper enables rapid development of blood vessels needed for normal growth of the fetus. Normally, copper and oestrogen levels begin to drop within 24 hours of delivery. It appears that PPD women have a genetic or required inability to eliminate excess copper.

When testing for copper we should do both serum copper and caeruloplasmin

Detecting Copper Imbalance:

Blood, urine and even hair analysis may not reveal copper toxicity directly. Copper is stored mainly in the brain, liver and other organs, not in the blood or urine.

Challenge tests with a chelating agent such as EDTA may be used to detect excess copper. Several indirect indicators on a hair mineral test are also excellent to detect copper imbalance. These include a hair calcium level greater than about 100 mg%, a potassium level less than about 3 mg%, a sodium/potassium ratio less than 2.5:1, a zinc/copper ratio less than 6:1, an elevated mercury level or a copper level less than 1.0 mg%.

Balancing Copper:

The author dealt with severe copper imbalance in himself and with many others for the past 18 years. Six methods are used to reduce copper in the tissues:

1. Reduce exposure to sources of copper.
2. Antagonists such as zinc, manganese and iron compete with copper for absorption and utilization. Vitamins B6 and folic acid may also be helpful. Selenium and cysteine may be helpful. Research indicates copper may be excreted by binding with glutathione and metallothionine which require these nutrients.
3. Chelators of copper include vitamin C, molybdenum and sulphur-containing amino acids. These bind and remove copper. More powerful chelators may be used, but can have side effects.
4. Enhance the eliminative organs, such as the liver, skin and colon.
5. Balance body chemistry, enhance energy production and improve adrenal gland activity. To support the adrenal glands, avoid sweets, eat protein with each meal, and supplement your diet with vitamins A, C and E, manganese, zinc and B-complex vitamins. Animal protein is very helpful due to its higher content of zinc, B-vitamins and sulphur amino acids including cysteine and taurine. Adrenal glandular substance is also frequently helpful.
6. Reduce fear and stress. Methods range from a change in location or work to meditation, therapy, more rest and other changes.

Copper Detoxification Symptoms:
One of the difficulties in reducing excess copper are symptoms that arise during the process of elimination. As the body begins to mobilize excess copper from tissue storage sites, it enters the bloodstream on its way to the liver and kidneys for elimination. While in the bloodstream, the copper can cause headaches, skin rashes, racing thoughts, strange odours, digestive upset, mood swings and energy fluctuations. In men, testicular pain is not uncommon. Women s periods may be affected. If one knows what is occurring, it is possible to take measures to minimize these temporary elimination symptoms. Enemas, sweating, and drinking more water can help promote copper elimination. Reducing the nutrition program for a few days may also help slow the reactions and reduce symptoms if they are severe. Supplements particularly molybdenum, bile acids, laxative herbs and vitamin B6 may also mitigate elimination symptoms.

4. Pyrrole Biotype…15%

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGE5MLPRRjU)

These patients have a deficiency of serotonin and GABA (which is the chief calming neurotransmitter in the central nervous system)

This is a stress disorder with onset of depression often triggered by severe emotional or physical trauma. There are often severe mood swings, inability to cope with stress, absence of dream recall, sunburn tendency and an inability to tan, morning nausea, and sensitivity to bright lights and loud noises. Many persons with severe pyrrole disorder have slender wrists, ankles, and neck, while having amounts of fat at the mid section and upper thighs. Female pyrrolurics may report disturbed menstrual periods or amenorrhoea (absence of periods).

Persons with this depression by a type are prone to delayed puberty and significant growth after age 16. Other symptoms include reading disorders, and academic underachievement regardless of intelligence. They tend to be fearful and pessimistic persons and isolate themselves from others. Many persons with this biotype have extreme mood swings that may occur many times daily. Persons with pyrrole disorder suffer from a double deficiency of zinc and vitamin B6 that may be genetic in nature. This results in a tendency for low brain levels of serotonin, dopamine, and GABA, which is a recipe for depression and anxiety.

Nutrient therapy involves normalization of zinc and B6 levels.

Deficiency of zinc and B6 may be severe and genetic in nature and high doses (Many times the RDI) are often required to bring blood and zinc and B6 to normal levels.

Pyrrole disorders indicate elevated oxidative stress: Ample doses of
selenium,
glutathione,
vitamin C,
vitamin D,
vitamin E and other antioxidants assist in treatment.

Depressed persons with pyrrole disorder respond more quickly to nutrient therapy then the other depression biotypes. Clear improvement is usually noticed within a few days, with the therapy achieving full effect within 4 to 6 weeks. Because of morning nausea, many persons with pyrrole disorder cannot tolerate nutrients until lunchtime. They tend to perform badly in the morning and are at their best late at night.
Walsh claims that plasma zinc test is useful.

5. Toxic overload depression…5%

Most of these cases involved over loads of lead, Mercury, Cadmium, or arsenic. This form of depression is estimated to affect one in every 500 persons in the USA. Depression usually arises suddenly during a period of relative calm and wellness. There is often abdominal pain in cramping, increased irritability headaches and muscle weakness, low energy, and failure to respond to counseling or psychiatric medications.

Toxic metal overload can be difficult to diagnose due to low concentrations of toxic metals in blood.

Since depression due to metal toxicity is relatively uncommon, a logical first it is to rule out the presence of under methylation, folate deficiency, copper overload, pyrrole disorder, casein – gluten allergy, or a thyroid imbalance. Careful chemical analysis of toxic metals in scalp here can serve as a screen, recognizing the possibility of a false positive resulting from external contamination.

Young children are especially sensitive to toxic metals since their blood brain barriers a still immature and the toxins can interfere with the development of brain cells and receptors. For example, lead poisoning can reduce IQ in young children. Depression, irritability, abdominal discomfort, kidney damage, and liver damage are the primary results of serious metal poisoning for adults. It is, therefore, not surprising that toxic metal overload can cause clinical depression. Nutrient therapy for lead poisoning involves supplements of calcium, promotion of metallothionein synthesis, and generous supplements of antioxidants. Lead is a bone seeker with about 95% of lead stored within the skeletal structure. Persons with high levels of lead in their bones are continuously exposed to this toxin as it slowly departs the skeletal system. Accordingly these persons may need to continue therapy to remove lead for the rest of their lives. In most cases this can be accomplished by inexpensive supplements of calcium and zinc. Mercury is a lethal poison that is especially devastating to children from conception to age 4 years, the period when most brain development occurs. Mercury has a remarkable affinity for glutathione and MT proteins and nutrients therapy that increases amounts of these proteins can effectively remove mercury from the body A meal involving tuna or other large fish made bring 20 to 40 µg of mercury in a day. Cadmium is especially dangerous since it tends to accumulate in kidneys and cause permanent damage. Sources of cadmium include shellfish, fertilisers, fireworks, artist’s paints, mining operations, and various industrial plants. Cadmium is present in cigarettes, and smoking 1 to 2 packs daily 10 double blood and tissue levels of the metal. Cadmium removal must be accomplished with caution to avoid kidney damage and treatments that enhance MT proteins are safe. Arsenic overloads are relatively rare and difficult to diagnose. The symptoms include upper respiratory problems, anorexia, muscle weakness, and irritation of mucus membranes. A definitive test for arsenic poisoning is the elevation of levels in scalp hair. The principal sources of arsenic are seafoods, contaminated drinking water and pesticides. It has also been found on treated wood and playground equipment and poultry feed.

Nutrient therapy involving calcium and enhancement of glutathione protein levels can hasten the exit of arsenic.
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19-10-2015, 03:07 PM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(19-10-2015 02:59 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  Hi everyone, I have 20 years experience treating mental illness. I suggest the following may be life changing for many people...
How would you find out which type you are? I'm not sure my last blood test accounted for all those.
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19-10-2015, 03:27 PM (This post was last modified: 19-10-2015 04:14 PM by Mark Fulton.)
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(19-10-2015 03:07 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  
(19-10-2015 02:59 PM)Mark Fulton Wrote:  Hi everyone, I have 20 years experience treating mental illness. I suggest the following may be life changing for many people...
How would you find out which type you are? I'm not sure my last blood test accounted for all those.

1. have a "whole blood histamine blood test"
2. have a urine test for pyroluria. The urine has to be snap frozen and kept in the dark...make sure the pathology company knows how to do it
3. check blood copper, zinc, homocysteine....but be careful with interpretation

Also...(from me, not Walsh)
....check vit D (and don't accept the pathology company's lower limit of normal...double it )
....check B12 and the same comment as above applies
....check thyroid function
....take 1 drop of iodine a day (approx 250 mcg)
....take lots of omega 3's
....take magnesium (preferably in powder form)

try googling "orthomolecular physician" near where you live and go see him or her.
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19-10-2015, 04:12 PM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
More info on this for you...

From Dr William Walsh Nutrient Power:

Identify Clinical Clues to Recognize Chemical Imbalances

The primary nutrient imbalances that impact mental health are usually accompanied by a distinctive set of symptoms and traits. This information can be valuable in forming a correct diagnosis, especially when chemistry findings are inconclusive. General syndromes associated with these imbalances are summarized below. The presence of more than 30% of these symptoms and traits is considered a positive indication of the imbalance: ------

Zinc deficiency

Poor growth through puberty with significant growth after age 16, white spots on fingernails, frequent infections, tendency for sunburn, preference for spicy foods, irritability, poor stress control, anger, poor wound healing, poor muscle development, premature graying of hair, abnormal or absent menstrual periods, stretch marks on skin.

Copper overload

Hyperactivity, academic underachievement, skin sensitivity to metals and rough fabrics, estrogen intolerance, emotional meltdowns, ringing in ears, sensitivity to food dyes, high anxiety, sleep problems, adverse reaction to nutritional supplements containing copper, abnormal menstrual periods.

Undermethylation

Obsessive-compulsive tendencies, seasonal allergies, strong-willed, competitive in games and sports, ritualistic behaviors, high libido, poor pain tolerance, addictive tendencies, sparse arm/ leg/ chest hair, history of perfectionism, chronic depression, high fluidity (tears, saliva), phobias.

Overmethylation
High anxiety; dry eyes and mouth; hirsutism [excess hair]; noncompetitive; low libido; talkative; low motivation in early school years; obsessions without compulsive actions; sleep disorder; food and chemical sensitivities; estrogen intolerance; absence of seasonal allergies; postpartum depression; antihistamine intolerance; adverse reaction to SSRI antidepressants, methionine, and SAMe.

Pyrrole disorder
Poor stress control, poor short-term memory, reading disorder, sensitivity to noise and bright lights, little or no dream recall, spleen area pain, poor growth, many fears, dry skin, underachievement, tendency to skip breakfast, frequent infections, extreme mood swings, severe inner tension, abnormal fat distribution, affinity for spicy or salty foods, high anxiety, delayed puberty, abnormal EEG. 2

Toxic metal overload
Abdominal discomfort, poor appetite, increased irritability and temper, decline in academics, metallic taste in mouth, bad breath, change in personality. Although the above information is helpful in forming a diagnosis, it should be considered inconclusive in the absence of blood and urine testing. The combination of a good medical history and reliable lab testing is essential to accurate diagnosis. There are several labs in the USA and elsewhere that capably perform these tests. If possible, samples should be submitted to labs with CLIA certification to maximize the chances of high proficiency.

Some of useful laboratory tests are described below:

Whole blood histamine

This is a useful test for evaluating methylation status. Histamine and methyl groups are present in measurable levels throughout the body, and an inverse relationship exists between them. Histamine is metabolized (destroyed) by methylation, and this is a primary mechanism for regulating histamine concentrations. Elevated blood histamine indicates undermethylation, and low histamine is evidence of overmethylation. Antihistamine treatments can artificially lower blood histamine and should be avoided for several days prior to sampling.

Laboratory assays for SAMe/ SAH ratio are more decisive, but they are not widely available in commercial laboratories.

Plasma zinc
There are about 10 different approaches for measuring zinc status, and zinc experts have consistently regarded plasma testing as the best way to obtain reliable and meaningful results. The zinc concentration in blood serum is nearly identical, but this approach involves a greater likelihood of contamination during sampling. Some doctors prefer to assay packed cells, which gives an indication of the zinc level within blood cells rather than in blood fluids. Testing of both plasma and blood cells provides additional information – though is often not necessary.

Serum copper
This is a routine and highly reliable assay that is available in many parts of the world. Copper has special significance in mental health due to its role in metabolism of dopamine and synthesis of norepinephrine. Elevated serum copper can alter the synaptic activity of these important neurotransmitters.

Urine pyrroles
This chemical assay is available in laboratories in the USA, Europe, and Australia and is gaining in popularity. This test identifies pyrrole disorder - a medical condition associated with extreme deficiencies of B-6 and zinc – and is also an assessment for oxidative stress. Pyrrole disorder typically involves high anxiety, poor behavioral control, a reading disorder, impaired 3 immune function, and other troubling symptoms. Severe pyrrole levels have been observed in persons diagnosed with violent behaviors, depression, schizophrenia, and other serious mental disorders. Elevated pyrroles can also result from excessive oxidative stress levels in persons who do not have the classic symptoms and traits of pyrrole disorder.

Serum ceruloplasmin
In healthy individuals, about 80 to 95% of serum copper is bound to ceruloplasmin, with the remaining 5-20% present as loosely bound atoms or unbound free radicals. Patients with more than 25% of their copper not bound to ceruloplasmin have a metal metabolism disorder involving elevated oxidative stress. This condition is common in autism, postpartum depression, ADHD, and certain forms of psychosis.

Thyroid panel
A surprisingly high number of patients with chemical imbalances also exhibit hypothyroidism. Normalizing thyroid levels is essential to treatment success for these persons. In rare cases, hypothyroidism alone can cause clinical depression or psychosis. Liver enzymes The presence of elevated liver enzymes suggests this organ is under significant stress, and nutrient therapy should be modified to avoid aggravating the condition.

Liver enzyme elevations are a common side effect of psychiatric medications. In any case, high dosages of niacinamide and fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, and E should be avoided for these patients. Treatment Response

Malabsorption
About 10% of patients are malabsorbers who process foods and nutritional supplements with low efficiency. These patients need higher nutrient doses to normalize body chemistry. My general rule is to increase dosages by 10%, 20%, or 30% for persons with mild, moderate, or severe malabsorption, respectively. Stress Dosing Patients with a history of zinc deficiency have a tendency to emotionally relapse during a prolonged, stressful period. Over the years we have learned that temporary increases of zinc can be very useful in maintaining treatment effectiveness. Response Times - Overview The response to nutrient therapy is relatively slow when compared with that of psychiatric medications. In addition, response times vary greatly for different chemical imbalances. Typical treatment response times (assuming good compliance) are shown below for some of the major biochemical imbalances: ---

Pyrrole disorder
Nice improvement in behavior control and calming can be seen during week one, with full effectiveness after one month.

Zinc deficiency
Little improvement is seen during the first two weeks, with gradual improvement thereafter and full effectiveness after 60 days.

Copper overload
There are many reports of mild worsening during the first 10 days, followed by clear improvement during weeks three and four and full effectiveness after three to four months (except in the case of type A blood, which may require 6-12 months for full effectiveness).

Overmethylation
There is increased anxiety during the first two to three weeks, followed by sharp improvement during weeks four to eight and full effectiveness after three to four months.

Undermethylation
Little/no improvement is seen during the first three to four weeks, followed by steady improvement during months two to six.

Toxic metal overload There is mild worsening during the first 10 days, followed by steady improvement for four to six months. Removal of lead is especially slow (halflife of long -term lead in the body is 22 years). Other metal toxins can be removed relatively quickly.

Problems Factors that often retard progress are malabsorption, type A blood, and hypoglycemia. Patients who have all three factors require great patience since initial progress can be delayed by several months. In addition, treatment response usually is very protracted for treatment of undermethylated schizophrenia and bipolar patients. For these persons, improvement usually begins after 3 to 6 weeks, with 12 months often needed for the full effect. 1Walsh, Dr. William J. (2014-05-06), Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain - (Kindle Locations 2962-2975). Skyhorse Publishing. Kindle Edition. Ed Note: I strongly recommended reading this book to learn more about assessment and treatment for resistant mind conditions. Details matter. - Epigenetic Video Training & List of many CorePsych Posts on Depression Biotypes: http://corepsych.com/walsh-resources - Walsh as a Critical Thinker: http://corepsych.com/critical - CorePsych Assessment Resources – Walsh Trained: http://corepsych.com/services - For others: Download this PDF: http://corepsych.com/walsh
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19-10-2015, 04:19 PM
RE: The Depression/Anxiety Thread
(19-10-2015 03:07 PM)Clockwork Wrote:  How would you find out which type you are? I'm not sure my last blood test accounted for all those.

My advice is this: See a professional health carer such as a fully qualified Doctor.

Had I asked my medical advice on the web I'd be dead already.

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
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