The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
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21-11-2016, 06:21 PM
The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-re...-marketing
Quote:The Federal Trade Commission today announced a new “Enforcement Policy Statement on Marketing Claims for Over-the-Counter (OTC) Homeopathic Drugs.” The policy statement was informed by an FTC workshop held last year to examine how such drugs are marketed to consumers. The FTC also released its staff report on the workshop, which summarizes the panel presentations and related public comments in addition to describing consumer research commissioned by the FTC.

The policy statement explains that the FTC will hold efficacy and safety claims for OTC homeopathic drugs to the same standard as other products making similar claims. That is, companies must have competent and reliable scientific evidence for health-related claims, including claims that a product can treat specific conditions. The statement describes the type of scientific evidence that the Commission requires of companies making such claims for their products.

Homeopathy, which dates back to the 1700s, is based on the theory that disease symptoms can be treated by minute doses of substances that produce similar symptoms when provided in larger doses to healthy people. Many homeopathic products are diluted to such an extent that they no longer contain detectable levels of the initial substance. According to the policy statement, homeopathic theories are not accepted by most modern medical experts.

For the vast majority of OTC homeopathic drugs, the policy statement notes, “the case for efficacy is based solely on traditional homeopathic theories and there are no valid studies using current scientific methods showing the product’s efficacy.” As such, the marketing claims for these products are likely misleading, in violation of the FTC Act.

However, the policy statement also notes that “the FTC has long recognized that marketing claims may include additional explanatory information to prevent the claims from being misleading. Accordingly, it recognizes that an OTC homeopathic drug claim that is not substantiated by competent and reliable scientific evidence might not be deceptive if the advertisement or label where it appears effectively communicates that: 1) there is no scientific evidence that the product works; and 2) the product’s claims are based only on theories of homeopathy from the 1700s that are not accepted by most modern medical experts.

The policy statement notes that any such disclosures should stand out and be in close proximity to the product’s efficacy message and might need to be incorporated into that message. It also warns marketers not to undercut a disclosure with additional positive statements or consumer endorsements reinforcing a product’s efficacy. The statement warns that the FTC will carefully scrutinize the net impression of OTC homeopathic marketing claims and that if an ad conveys more substantiation than a marketer has, it will violate the FTC Act.

The Commission vote approving the enforcement policy statement and issuance of the staff report on the Homeopathic Medicine & Advertising Workshop was 3-0.

If it were up to me, I'd try to get all the legitimate pharmacies to pull homeopathic remedies from their shelves, but hey, this is a step in the right direction.

If we came from dust, then why is there still dust?
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21-11-2016, 06:27 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
(21-11-2016 06:21 PM)cactus Wrote:  https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-re...-marketing
Quote:The Federal Trade Commission today announced a new “Enforcement Policy Statement on Marketing Claims for Over-the-Counter (OTC) Homeopathic Drugs.” The policy statement was informed by an FTC workshop held last year to examine how such drugs are marketed to consumers. The FTC also released its staff report on the workshop, which summarizes the panel presentations and related public comments in addition to describing consumer research commissioned by the FTC.

The policy statement explains that the FTC will hold efficacy and safety claims for OTC homeopathic drugs to the same standard as other products making similar claims. That is, companies must have competent and reliable scientific evidence for health-related claims, including claims that a product can treat specific conditions. The statement describes the type of scientific evidence that the Commission requires of companies making such claims for their products.

Homeopathy, which dates back to the 1700s, is based on the theory that disease symptoms can be treated by minute doses of substances that produce similar symptoms when provided in larger doses to healthy people. Many homeopathic products are diluted to such an extent that they no longer contain detectable levels of the initial substance. According to the policy statement, homeopathic theories are not accepted by most modern medical experts.

For the vast majority of OTC homeopathic drugs, the policy statement notes, “the case for efficacy is based solely on traditional homeopathic theories and there are no valid studies using current scientific methods showing the product’s efficacy.” As such, the marketing claims for these products are likely misleading, in violation of the FTC Act.

However, the policy statement also notes that “the FTC has long recognized that marketing claims may include additional explanatory information to prevent the claims from being misleading. Accordingly, it recognizes that an OTC homeopathic drug claim that is not substantiated by competent and reliable scientific evidence might not be deceptive if the advertisement or label where it appears effectively communicates that: 1) there is no scientific evidence that the product works; and 2) the product’s claims are based only on theories of homeopathy from the 1700s that are not accepted by most modern medical experts.

The policy statement notes that any such disclosures should stand out and be in close proximity to the product’s efficacy message and might need to be incorporated into that message. It also warns marketers not to undercut a disclosure with additional positive statements or consumer endorsements reinforcing a product’s efficacy. The statement warns that the FTC will carefully scrutinize the net impression of OTC homeopathic marketing claims and that if an ad conveys more substantiation than a marketer has, it will violate the FTC Act.

The Commission vote approving the enforcement policy statement and issuance of the staff report on the Homeopathic Medicine & Advertising Workshop was 3-0.

If it were up to me, I'd try to get all the legitimate pharmacies to pull homeopathic remedies from their shelves, but hey, this is a step in the right direction.

I think all this means is that they have to add the same wording as nutritional supplements:

"These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease."

Surprised they didn't already have to do this.

#sigh
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21-11-2016, 06:31 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
I don't care what mistakes humans make with their own health care, but marketing homeopathetic "remedies" to pet owner for their charges should be met with automatic weapons fire.
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21-11-2016, 06:35 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
(21-11-2016 06:31 PM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  I don't care what mistakes humans make with their own health care, but marketing homeopathetic "remedies" to pet owner for their charges should be met with automatic weapons fire.

It worked for Anjele's featherless parrot. Might've just been getting better anyway but I prefer to think of it as the once-removed placebo effect. The bird believed that Anjele believed that this would make it all better. Religion is much like this. Big Grin

#sigh
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21-11-2016, 06:36 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
your logic leaves out the children of the misinformed, so my solution involves your solution for anyone who advocates health benefits from uber-weak solutions Tongue
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21-11-2016, 06:42 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
They should just be legally required to make all of the homeopathic remedies taste like those black and orange peanut butter candies that old grannies pass out on halloween, so helpless children will spit it out and demand the real thing from their ignorant-ass parents.

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21-11-2016, 06:52 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
[Image: dilution.png]

.......................................

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21-11-2016, 07:03 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
(21-11-2016 06:35 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(21-11-2016 06:31 PM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  I don't care what mistakes humans make with their own health care, but marketing homeopathetic "remedies" to pet owner for their charges should be met with automatic weapons fire.

It worked for Anjele's featherless parrot. Might've just been getting better anyway but I prefer to think of it as the once-removed placebo effect. The bird believed that Anjele believed that this would make it all better. Religion is much like this. Big Grin

My yoga teacher gave her dog some homeopathic crap and claimed he got better but people perceive their animals getting better. It's a sort of placebo effect, once removed. I also kinda think dogs are particularly sensitive to human behavior.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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21-11-2016, 07:08 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
(21-11-2016 06:35 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(21-11-2016 06:31 PM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  I don't care what mistakes humans make with their own health care, but marketing homeopathetic "remedies" to pet owner for their charges should be met with automatic weapons fire.

It worked for Anjele's featherless parrot. Might've just been getting better anyway but I prefer to think of it as the once-removed placebo effect. The bird believed that Anjele believed that this would make it all better. Religion is much like this. Big Grin

It still works whenever she decides to get naked. Whatever makes it work is fine with me. She looks ready for the stewpot when she decides to pluck. Undecided

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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21-11-2016, 07:20 PM
RE: The FTC is cracking down on homeopathic remedies
Man, I'm glad I read that twice. Blush
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