The Feelings Factor
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30-05-2014, 11:11 AM
The Feelings Factor
Should feelings be factored into a debate? If so, when or under what circumstances or to what extent? Are there some debates where feelings ought to weigh in more heavily?

I see discussions that hit emotional chords but are presided over by logic and logic alone. When emotions come in, they're often dismissed (depending on the topic). This may often be a good thing however, as emotions have been known to impair good judgment.

I've heard it said "there should be a balance." If so, how should logic and emotions be balanced and when, and how ought this to be determined?

A person very dear to me was badly hurt through a misunderstanding and miscommunication. For this, I am sorry, and he knows it. That said, any blaming me for malicious intent is for the birds. I will not wear some scarlet letter, I will not be anybody's whipping girl, and I will not lurk in silence.
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30-05-2014, 11:21 AM (This post was last modified: 30-05-2014 05:05 PM by goodwithoutgod.)
RE: The Feelings Factor
(30-05-2014 11:11 AM)Charis Wrote:  Should feelings be factored into a debate? If so, when or under what circumstances or to what extent? Are there some debates where feelings ought to weigh in more heavily?

I see discussions that hit emotional chords but are presided over by logic and logic alone. When emotions come in, they're often dismissed (depending on the topic). This may often be a good thing however, as emotions have been known to impair good judgment.

I've heard it said "there should be a balance." If so, how should logic and emotions be balanced and when, and how ought this to be determined?

Emotions cloud the mind's ability to objectivity consider information. A lot of believer's are extremely emotional, they cannot rationally substantiate their belief because when you enter a debate with them, and question their faith, or point out that there is no evidence of miracle performing son of god jesus christ, and the additional fact that no one who wrote of jesus actually knew him...etc...this sends them into a passionate emotional flurry of indignation...driven by emotion, not fact, not logical processing of evidence...just emotion.

So in my opinion, emotion is an obstacle for any intelligent debate/conversation as it blocks your ability to be open to and consider new information.

How to do that? good question as we humans are emotional creatures it seems Tongue

“That which can be asserted without evidence, can be dismissed without evidence.” - Christopher Hitchens

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30-05-2014, 11:35 AM
RE: The Feelings Factor
I'm not supposed to be drooling over your profile pic while I'm trying to read your response....
Uniforms. I swear.

A person very dear to me was badly hurt through a misunderstanding and miscommunication. For this, I am sorry, and he knows it. That said, any blaming me for malicious intent is for the birds. I will not wear some scarlet letter, I will not be anybody's whipping girl, and I will not lurk in silence.
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30-05-2014, 11:37 AM
RE: The Feelings Factor
I agree with Goodwithoutgod, but the question begs, how do we divorce ourselves from our own emotions. When looking into something or someone elses issues that we have no emotional stake in, the picture seems crystal clear to us, yet when looking inwardly, the emotions send the mind into a million different paths, unable to see any one path clearly.

I dont think that anyone can be Spock like logical in a debate, since they would probably have a fairly high personal stake in the topic, thus allowing it to become a derisive factor during a debate.

It should be avoided if possible and corrected as soon as its detected, by either party.

If bullshit were music some people would be a brass band.
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30-05-2014, 11:39 AM
RE: The Feelings Factor
(30-05-2014 11:35 AM)Charis Wrote:  I'm not supposed to be drooling over your profile pic while I'm trying to read your response....
Uniforms. I swear.

Dodgy

Just look at my avatar, that should cool yer heels. Tongue

If bullshit were music some people would be a brass band.
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30-05-2014, 12:01 PM
RE: The Feelings Factor
Appeal to emotion or argumentum ad passiones is a logical fallacy which uses the manipulation of the recipient's emotions, rather than valid logic, to win an argument. The appeal to emotion fallacy uses emotions as the basis of an argument's position without factual evidence that logically supports the major ideas endorsed by the elicitor of the argument. Also, this kind of thinking may be evident in one who lets emotions and/or other subjective considerations influence one's reasoning process. This kind of appeal to emotion is a type of red herring and encompasses several logical fallacies, including:

Appeal to consequences
Appeal to fear
Appeal to flattery
Appeal to pity
Appeal to ridicule
Appeal to spite
Wishful thinking

The problem with Emotion in arguments is they are 100% subjective. Now in cases where subjectivity is appreciated (such as art) then yes emotions play a part. However in most debate settings the person going to emotion is fleeing empirical evidence and fact.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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30-05-2014, 12:10 PM
RE: The Feelings Factor
Emotions are the same as pain - a warning system.

If you experience negative emotions while engaging in a thread, it's time to disengage and ponder why you received a warning from your brain.

If you see another person falling apart during a discussion, it's better to refrain from feeding into that. The person obviously has gone too far and is not able to disengage, or they have some issues. Debating them at that point doesn't make for a good debate anymore, and it is also unkind.

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30-05-2014, 12:11 PM
RE: The Feelings Factor
It should be noted that ultimately, logic is a tool used by subjectivity, or emotion. Logic has no preference, and yet we employ it to demonstrate that our innate preferences are, or should be, desirable to others, too.

I am a repressed, socially retarded, egotistical, attention starved, solipsistic, passive aggressive, and perpetually aggrieved gay manlet, who is also possibly a hetero incel beta male member of an omega male brothel
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30-05-2014, 12:16 PM
RE: The Feelings Factor
(30-05-2014 12:01 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Appeal to emotion or argumentum ad passiones is a logical fallacy which uses the manipulation of the recipient's emotions, rather than valid logic, to win an argument. The appeal to emotion fallacy uses emotions as the basis of an argument's position without factual evidence that logically supports the major ideas endorsed by the elicitor of the argument. Also, this kind of thinking may be evident in one who lets emotions and/or other subjective considerations influence one's reasoning process. This kind of appeal to emotion is a type of red herring and encompasses several logical fallacies, including:

Appeal to consequences
Appeal to fear
Appeal to flattery
Appeal to pity
Appeal to ridicule
Appeal to spite
Wishful thinking

The problem with Emotion in arguments is they are 100% subjective. Now in cases where subjectivity is appreciated (such as art) then yes emotions play a part. However in most debate settings the person going to emotion is fleeing empirical evidence and fact.

You are correct, but you are also assuming that the appeal to emotion was done with intent as a tool to win the debate.

What happens when its done unintentionally and in a more puritan spirit, without malice if you will.

If bullshit were music some people would be a brass band.
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30-05-2014, 12:21 PM
RE: The Feelings Factor
(30-05-2014 12:16 PM)War Horse Wrote:  What happens when its done unintentionally and in a more puritan spirit, without malice if you will.
You disregard it. Tell them their feelings aren't relevant to you in a debate, and ask them if they could stop trying to make them relevant.

Although, in the case that the exchange is in-person, and they're visibly flustered, maybe ask them if they'd like to take a break and re-engage later?

I am a repressed, socially retarded, egotistical, attention starved, solipsistic, passive aggressive, and perpetually aggrieved gay manlet, who is also possibly a hetero incel beta male member of an omega male brothel
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