The Geology Thread
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27-07-2016, 10:26 AM
The Geology Thread
We have a science section, but all of the sciences are just kind of grouped together under that singular label. How about a thread (or a series of threads) on a specific scientific topic for info and Q&A? (I once had a Weekly Paleontology Thread that I couldn't keep up, but I could do one for Paleo too).

Ask most people what Geology is, and they will probably hazard a guess that it is the study of rocks, which is at least partially correct. Geologists study the Earth, and rocks are a common source of information for most geologists. But geology is quite diverse with respect to the sub-disciplines within it. To highlight some of these subdivisions, here is a list of the divisions within The Geological Society of America:
Archaeological Geology
Energy Geology
Environmental & Engineering Geology
Geobiology & Geomicrobiology
Geoinformatics
Geology and Health
Geology and Society
Geophysics
Geoscience Education
History and Philosophy of Geology
Hydrogeology
Karst (Caves and Limestone-dominated topography)
Limnogeology (lakes)
Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology
Planetary Geology
Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology (Quaternary Geology are the more recent sediments on Earth and Geomorphology is the study of Earth surface landforms)
Sedimentary Geology
Structural Geology and Tectonics


And that list doesn't cover everything, notably absent from the above list are:
Paleontology
Paleoclimatology
Atmospheric Science (Meteorology)

(these are all absent because they are large enough groups so as to have their own organizations. A cursory glance at the list of topics at any given GSA conference will also give you a good idea of how broad the field is)

Geologists study everything from the atmosphere to the geosphere. We are interested in how the water cycle works, especially since most people on Earth get their water from groundwater. We are interested in the distribution of resources, like: oil, gas, minerals, geothermal energy, etc. We study the history of life (including its origin), climate, and environmental change, and when these impact one another. We study how the Earth, moon, and solar system formed, as well as the origins of the elements and their distributions within and outside the solar system.

I am the most interested in Paleontology, Geochemistry, and Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. These are the areas where I have some expertise.

But what exactly do geologists do? I think one of the unfortunate side effects of teaching science the way we do (as more history of science than how to do science) is that people often assume we already know pretty much everything within these fields and that now we are mostly just technicians looking for specific things instead of active research on unsolved/unresolved questions.

Here are some questions being researched in Paleontology, Geochemistry, and Sedimentology and Stratigraphy:
[b]How did life originate, and when?
What were the first living things like, and how did they survive on the early Earth?
What was the Earth like during the past, considering it has 4.56 billion years of history? Ergo, what was the climate like and how and why has it evolved? How has the surface of the Earth changed?
What impacts has life had on Earth? How has it contributed to changes in climate and environment?
How does climatic and environmental change impact life?
What sorts of events trigger these climatic and environmental shifts?
What triggers and kill mechanisms are responsible for the mass extinctions we see in the fossil record?
How did these ancient organisms live? Where did they live? What were/are they related to?
What does the sedimentary record tell us about Earth's ancient environments and climates? What does the geochemical record tell us?
How have the oceans evolved over Earth's history and what influence did this have on life?
How has the terrestrial realm evolved over Earth's history and what influence did this have on life?
What were the first organisms to colonize: the oceans, freshwater, land? How did they manage these new environments?


There is a wealth of information from research on these topics/questions available. Most geologists study either broad long-term variations of these questions, or look at more specific instances in time to address them. So, one might study the history of life and climate over the last 550 million years, or one might pick a specific window of time (like the PETM or the Permian-Triassic or the Late Ordovician, etc) to try and unravel what happened then and why.

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
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27-07-2016, 10:36 AM
RE: The Geology Thread
I applaud your passion but...

I suspect that this will go over as well as my money thread. Weeping

Hopefully I’ll be proven wrong.

Q: “What does the sedimentary record tell us about Earth’s ancient environments and climates?”
A: About 4,500 years ago there was a worldwide flood. Angel

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27-07-2016, 10:41 AM
RE: The Geology Thread
(27-07-2016 10:36 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  I applaud your passion but...

I suspect that this will go over as well as my money thread. Weeping

Hopefully I’ll be proven wrong.

Q: “What does the sedimentary record tell us about Earth’s ancient environments and climates?”
A: About 4,500 years ago there was a worldwide flood. Angel

"Q: “What does the sedimentary record tell us about Earth’s ancient environments and climates?”
A: About 4,500 years ago there was a worldwide flood. "


Ummm Consider Close? I mean...it does say something about the past and deposition in the ocean for much of it...but...yeah...



"I suspect that this will go over as well as my money thread."

I've had threads die slow deaths, and threads never get off the ground. Shit happens.

Being nice is something stupid people do to hedge their bets
-Rick
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27-07-2016, 10:42 AM
RE: The Geology Thread
[Image: tumblr_n6kaiwYPGB1s9ab4to1_500.gif]

.......................................

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27-07-2016, 10:42 AM
RE: The Geology Thread
Well I'm biased as my academic background includes Geology, Polar and Quaternary Geomorphology and a fair few of those other "ologies". So yes....its a wonderful collection of subjects to discuss, with much relevance when rebutting religious nonsense.

To answer your question Full Circle. The sedimentary record tells us lots about the Earth's ancient environments and climates..............what period are you interested in?

And no a worldwide flood did not happen 4,500 years ago.

But I guess you knew that anyway...........Cool

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27-07-2016, 10:45 AM
RE: The Geology Thread
I’ll start it up then. Just read...

"Evolution may have been waiting for a decent breath of oxygen, said researcher Chris Reinhard. And that was hard to come by. His research team is tracking down O2 concentrations in oceans, where earliest animals evolved.

By doing so, they have jumped into the middle of a heated scientific debate on what rising oxygen did, if anything, to charge up evolutionary eras. Reinhard, a geochemist from the Georgia Institute of Technology, is shaking up conventional thinking with the help of computer modeling.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...151511.htm

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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27-07-2016, 10:45 AM
RE: The Geology Thread
(27-07-2016 10:42 AM)Silly Deity Wrote:  To answer your question Full Circle. The sedimentary record tells us lots about the Earth's ancient environments and climates..............what period are you interested in?

And no a worldwide flood did not happen 4,500 years ago.

But I guess you knew that anyway...........Cool

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“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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27-07-2016, 08:24 PM
RE: The Geology Thread
I really wish the YECs understood what actually goes into radiometric dating. Sadly I expect that their little heads would pop like a string of firecrackers.

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27-07-2016, 11:34 PM
RE: The Geology Thread
(27-07-2016 08:24 PM)Paleophyte Wrote:  I really wish the YECs understood what actually goes into radiometric dating. Sadly I expect that their little heads would pop like a string of firecrackers.

It sounds foreign...radioMETRIC.

It would need to sound more ‘Murikan like say Radioyardage for YECs to even look at it. I’m assuming that most YEC are ‘Murikans.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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28-07-2016, 01:58 AM (This post was last modified: 28-07-2016 02:04 AM by Thumpalumpacus.)
RE: The Geology Thread
I took Geology 101 about three centuries ago, it was one of the classes that got my rational brain fired up. The first six weeks were about climate and the water cycle -- at first I was very much WTF?! But as the course unfolded, I realized how atmosphere, lithosphere, and climate interact.
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