The Homeschooling Tragedy
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17-09-2010, 11:23 AM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
(17-09-2010 09:56 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Not sure about elsewhere, but here in Canada, children that are homeschooled must be taught a guided curriculum.

Same in the U.S.

However, it doesn't work as planned. Parents have figured out how to exploit this. When the time comes to take the standardized tests to see if their child has been taught what they need to be taught, the child is drilled with the "heathenistic, wrong answers" so that they'll be able to regurgitate them once for the test, then return to their YEC beliefs forever after.

I know this because one of my friends is a homeschooled YEC. When I asked how she had passed the test (this was immediately following a long and complicated debate on evolutionary biology), she said that she had done the above.

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17-09-2010, 12:23 PM
 
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
Does a child need to be home schooled to be indoctrinated? If you start at a young age, before they go to school, they'll have a fixed mindset that will be difficult to alter no matter how much of a proper education you give them.

I think the greatest tragedy of being home schooled is the lack of social experience. I have had experience with Indians (I'm not being racist- I am Indian, it just so happens that I have greater experience with them) who have been home schooled and in 6th grade they are capable of doing math at a college level. Yet, they couldn't carry out a social conversation with a non-Indian person for more than 15 seconds.
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17-09-2010, 01:31 PM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
I also question if you necessarily get a worse education being home schooled. There are some pretty crappy schools and some pretty crappy teachers out there. And, thanks to out-dated ideas like tenure, you can't get rid of these people and they just get shuffled around from class room to class room.

Like I said above - it's not for me and I wouldn't do it for my kids but I'm not going to chastise people who do. Religious nuts who keep their kids out so they can teach them that the Flintstones are an accurate historical representation are one thing, but that aside I've no real issue with home schooling.

Unbeliever - I take your point on drilling kids to pass the test, but I'm not sure that is remarkably different than what public schools do now.

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17-09-2010, 01:52 PM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
(17-09-2010 01:31 PM)BnW Wrote:  Unbeliever - I take your point on drilling kids to pass the test, but I'm not sure that is remarkably different than what public schools do now.

In that most people forget it immediately afterward, no, it isn't much different. In that they are indoctrinated to believe something else entirely beforehand, yes, it is.
People may not understand evolution after leaving public school, but at least they know the very basics and have been taught about it.

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17-09-2010, 11:19 PM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
(17-09-2010 09:08 AM)athnostic Wrote:  However, should home educators be held to some kind of standard? Public schools require teachers to meet particular standards of education: Should home schoolers be required to do the same?

Yes. Absolutely.
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18-09-2010, 01:33 AM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
My little sister is actually being home schooled, ironically because the private Christian school she was attending was teaching her evolution period, which my parents found disgusting. I sincerely fear for her future, but she's a remarkably open-minded little girl for all the isolation that's been brought on her. I'm disallowed to speak with her about my beliefs while she's still in her impressionable age, but I'm looking forward to a few years from now when I can talk with her about this.

As for the guide, I'm not so sure it's strictly enforced. I was home schooled for a year and I remember my science books distinctly mentioning the creation account. In the science book. And if I recall, more than a whole chapter dedicated to it. I hope she does some research herself, or catches on when the High School standardized tests come along that she needs to study for.

"It does feel like something to be wrong; it feels like being right." -Kathryn Schulz
I am 100% certain that I am wrong about something I am certain about right now. Because even if everything I stand for turns out to be completely true, I was still wrong about being wrong.
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09-11-2010, 08:45 AM
 
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
As a new parent, I have struggled with the idea of homeschooling our daughter. I am already a stay-at-home (and working full-time) dad. My wife teaches world and U.S. history at our local high school. I worked for three years in the school district (which makes me a seasoned veteran) before I finally had enough.

The lack of discipline, respect, accountability, etc... is not giving me much hope for the future of the country. The children that want to learn simply can't because of the "crowd-control" attention that must be given to classes instead of instruction.

Not all homeschooling families are fundamentalists. They're just the ones that give homeschooling a bad name. I knew several kids (religious) who were home schooled and they were dumber than a box of hair. I also knew some who were school by secular parents and were absolutely brilliant. Both groups were kind of ostracized when they attended public school. I blame the general lack of tolerance among kids for that. No one teaches their kids to respect others anymore. So, ironically, the problem with education also STARTS at home.

I have brought up the idea of homeschooling our daughter, and my wife is a little resistant. I think as she continues to teach, she may realize that she's better off in a homeschooling or group homeschooling environment. Her main concern is socialization. After working for a public school district, I'm not sure I want her socializing with the majority of kids in her generation. Maybe picking the right group of kids would be better.

I could just be talking out of my ass. I could be completely wrong. I just hold a lot of contempt for public schools. Not for the same reasons fundamentalist Christians do.

If I do send her to public school, it will certainly not be our local district.
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09-11-2010, 09:00 AM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
(09-11-2010 08:45 AM)tjenkins_1983 Wrote:  Her main concern is socialization. After working for a public school district, I'm not sure I want her socializing with the majority of kids in her generation. Maybe picking the right group of kids would be better.

I completely understand your point, and respect that you have a natural instinct to protect your child, as all good parents do. My problem with homeschooling, however, lies in this statement that you've made. It may be a little unfair for me to comment, since the school my daughter attends has what I believe to be a great population of kids for the most part. The bad element does exist though. I don't want my daughter to socialize with that element either. My view is different in that I think the exposure to that element is important throughout her life. It's imperative that she learn to carefully select those with which she will socialize, and at the same time learn to cope with those that she won't socialize.

Once she is grown, I will not be able to "pick the right group". Without experience in an environment where the wrong group exists, niether will she. Even among home schooling groups, the children (along with their parents) are selected, thereby eliminating those who are deemed "undesirable" by the parents of the group. How will the kids then learn to deal with those "undesirables" in the real world?

In the end, she will be exposed to the majority of her generation in once respect or another. I feel the best way to prepare her for this is to allow that exposure now, while I can still guide her, and help her make the choices that will serve her best, while at the same time, giving her the experience of making the choices and following through on them.

Best of luck to you tjenkins. You seem to genuinely have your daughters best interest at heart.

Just visiting.

-SR
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09-11-2010, 09:51 AM
 
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
(09-11-2010 09:00 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  
(09-11-2010 08:45 AM)tjenkins_1983 Wrote:  Her main concern is socialization. After working for a public school district, I'm not sure I want her socializing with the majority of kids in her generation. Maybe picking the right group of kids would be better.

I completely understand your point, and respect that you have a natural instinct to protect your child, as all good parents do. My problem with homeschooling, however, lies in this statement that you've made. It may be a little unfair for me to comment, since the school my daughter attends has what I believe to be a great population of kids for the most part. The bad element does exist though. I don't want my daughter to socialize with that element either. My view is different in that I think the exposure to that element is important throughout her life. It's imperative that she learn to carefully select those with which she will socialize, and at the same time learn to cope with those that she won't socialize.

Once she is grown, I will not be able to "pick the right group". Without experience in an environment where the wrong group exists, niether will she. Even among home schooling groups, the children (along with their parents) are selected, thereby eliminating those who are deemed "undesirable" by the parents of the group. How will the kids then learn to deal with those "undesirables" in the real world?

In the end, she will be exposed to the majority of her generation in once respect or another. I feel the best way to prepare her for this is to allow that exposure now, while I can still guide her, and help her make the choices that will serve her best, while at the same time, giving her the experience of making the choices and following through on them.

Best of luck to you tjenkins. You seem to genuinely have your daughters best interest at heart.

Thanks. I'm glad someone understands. I also agree completely that she should be exposed to the bad elements of society as well. However, in our town, it's pretty tough to be exposed to any good elements. I hate to sound pessimistic, but it's a blue collar (nothing wrong with that), ultra right-wing, evangelical, good ol' boy kind of town.

If closed-minded assholes could fly, this place would be an airport.
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09-11-2010, 04:37 PM
RE: The Homeschooling Tragedy
(09-11-2010 09:51 AM)tjenkins_1983 Wrote:  If closed-minded assholes could fly, this place would be an airport.

LMAO! I've gotta remember that one!

Like I said, I'm in a situation where there's a pretty good environment for my kids to go to school, so it's hard for me to really empathize. Move on up here to small-town-country-Canada. Be glad to send my kids to school with yours!

Just visiting.

-SR
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