The Myth (?) of Teenage Rebellion
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07-02-2015, 09:26 PM
RE: The Myth (?) of Teenage Rebellion
The key is to offer classes where only the smart nerds are admitted and use active learning strategies that allow them to create and think critically. But in a no child left behind public school world where egalitarian principles prevail, the smart kids get stuck with the purposely dumb ballers and glue sniffers. The stifling of talent is depressing.
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11-03-2015, 04:51 AM
RE: The Myth (?) of Teenage Rebellion
I believe... it's not becayse if the growth you feel awkward. You mind and body is just growing too fast you feel caged in with certain things. And it's not like nobody in history didn't go through adolescence. We don't know because it happened at an earlier age..
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18-03-2015, 03:44 AM
RE: The Myth (?) of Teenage Rebellion
The evolutionary reason for teenagers is to take risks. I agree that the functional opportunities for risk taking during teens has been constrained.
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18-03-2015, 04:22 AM
RE: The Myth (?) of Teenage Rebellion
It's something that perhaps grows more prominent and is experienced more often with more leisure time in societies for that age, but it's clear it was a concept in some cultures of cities in the past.

It did get expressed excessively in the Romantic periods of the 1700s-1800s when the Industrial Revolution occurred. That sparked a lot of views of this concept of lost childhoods and preponderances over the loss of innocence. But if you look at the literature written for centuries prior and back to some classical period myths, you still find elements often of the teenage rebellion and feelings of loneliness. It's blatantly in several Shakespeare plays from centuries earlier from R&J, Midsummers nights dream, and Hamlet ESPECIALLY.. plus more writings.

Does it shine through as a nomadic Mongol teenager? Idk, maybe so, maybe Genghis Khan who took a lot of charge in a young stage of his life was dealing with it and that drove him to desire unifying as many of the Nomadic people under his command at that period of life.

I do think it cultural influence makes it more harmful at times; Such as, the way a lot of parenting and education for kids is based upon forming a strong good/bad black or white world view. But once they grow into teenagers those lines and boundaries break down and it fractures the world view they're often told to believe.

"Allow there to be a spectrum in all that you see" - Neil Degrasse Tyson
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