The Psychology of Belief - Are the Religious Less Intelligent?
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07-03-2013, 08:42 AM
The Psychology of Belief - Are the Religious Less Intelligent?



Best and worst of Ferdinand .....
Best
Ferdinand: We don't really say 'theist' in Alabama. Here, you're either a Christian, or you're from Afghanistan and we fucking hate you.
Worst
Ferdinand: Everyone from British is so, like, fucking retarded.
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10-04-2013, 11:04 PM
RE: The Psychology of Belief - Are the Religious Less Intelligent?
"Moving on from the elite scientists of the National Academy and the Royal Society, is there any evidence that, in the population at large, atheists are likely to be drawn from among the better educated and more intelligent? Several research studies have been published on the statistical relationship between religiosity and educational level, or religiosity and IQ. Michael Shermer, in How We Believe: The Search for God in an Age of Science, describes a large survey of randomly chosen Americans that he and his colleague Frank Sulloway carried out. Among their many interesting results was the discovery that religiosity is indeed negatively correlated with education (more highly educated people are less likely to be religious). Religiosity is also negatively correlated with interest in science and (strongly) with political liberalism. None of this is surprising, nor is the fact there is a positive correlation between religiosity and parents' religiosity. Sociologists studying British children have found that only one in twelve break away from their parents' religious beliefs.

"As you might expect, different researchers measure things in different ways, so it is hard to compare different studies. Meta-analysis is the technique whereby an investigator looks at all the research papers that have been published on a topic, and counts up the number of papers that have concluded one thing, versus the number that have concluded something else. On the subject religion and IQ, the only meta-analysis known to me was published by Paul Bell in Mensa Magazine in 2002 (Mensa is the society of individuals with a high IQ, and their journal not surprisingly includes articles on the one thing that draws them together). Bell concluded: 'Of 43 studies carried out since 1927 on the relationship between religious belief and one's intelligence and/or educational level, all but four found an inverse connection. That is, the higher one's intelligence or educational level, the less one is likely to be religious or hold "beliefs" of any king.'"

Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion, Houton Mifflin Company, Boston - New York, 2006, pp 102,103.

Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice Is also great
And would suffice. -- Robert Frost
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11-04-2013, 01:10 AM
RE: The Psychology of Belief - Are the Religious Less Intelligent?
I've witnessed my fair share of some of the most immoral, psychopathic, uneducated, whimsical atheists to know that neither the "religious" nor "atheists" have a monopoly on intelligence or scepticism or empathy.
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11-04-2013, 05:51 AM
RE: The Psychology of Belief - Are the Religious Less Intelligent?
(11-04-2013 01:10 AM)poolboyg88 Wrote:  I've witnessed my fair share of some of the most immoral, psychopathic, uneducated, whimsical atheists to know that neither the "religious" nor "atheists" have a monopoly on intelligence or scepticism or empathy.


No one is arguing a monopoly, just a statistical correlation.
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12-04-2013, 04:49 AM
RE: The Psychology of Belief - Are the Religious Less Intelligent?
I think we should always be careful about comparing atheists as a group with any theist group. Identifying as an atheist as separate from the "nones" places you in a politically active and special distinct category that theists have no direct. equivalent to.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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