The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
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08-11-2011, 06:52 PM
The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
After a long and stressfull day.........if things are getting on top and if music is your medicine........if you feel to place earphones on, shut the world out and go on an imaginative journey and escape for those few timeless minutes......I dont care what genre of music it is........if it has an effect of bringing you some peace or moving you. Please post it here for others to share Smile

Burial-Endorphin.





Mt Eden-Vanishing Into.....





Sigur Rós-Njósnavélin (Live at Roskilde 2000)





Ave Maria





Window-The Album Leaf

(such a powerfull piece)





Peace out Heart

For no matter how much I use these symbols, to describe symptoms of my existence.
You are your own emphasis.
So I say nothing.

-Bemore.
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09-11-2011, 06:55 AM
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
Beethoven, Symphony 7, Allegretto, mvt 2





James Taylor - That Lonesome Road (sung by a choir)




For no matter how much I use these symbols, to describe symptoms of my existence.
You are your own emphasis.
So I say nothing.

-Bemore.
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09-11-2011, 11:21 AM
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
Bass head by Bassnectar Smile
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09-11-2011, 11:22 AM
 
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
seawhatwesees -Christofer Drew.[/align]
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09-11-2011, 03:40 PM (This post was last modified: 09-11-2011 03:56 PM by cufflink.)
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
(09-11-2011 06:55 AM)bemore Wrote:  Beethoven, Symphony 7, Allegretto, mvt 2




Hey bemore,

Glad to see you like the 2nd movement of the Beethoven Seventh. A friend of mine once told me that's the music he wants to be played at his memorial service (hopefully not too soon).

Do you know the rest of the symphony? The fourth (last) movement is a wild ride. (Some of Beethoven's contemporaries thought it had been composed in a "drunken fury.") This is a mind-blowing performance:





When I remember that this music was composed by a man who was stone deaf, it just confirms to me that we don't need gods in the sky. Because we've already had gods here on earth.

Religious disputes are like arguments in a madhouse over which inmate really is Napoleon.
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09-11-2011, 03:56 PM
 
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
(09-11-2011 03:40 PM)cufflink Wrote:  



When I remember that this music was composed by a man who was stone deaf, it just confirms to me that we don't need gods in the sky. Because we've already had gods here on earth.

cufflink, that photo on the video link sure brings back memories. I started playing in symphonic orchestras when I was 16 and have played, on and off, ever since (intermixed with chamber music trios and quartets).

The only thing that beats listening to music is being part of it -- you can actually feel the music going through you, surrounding you and flowing out of you at the same time.

A truly spiritual experience. Smile
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09-11-2011, 04:22 PM
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
(09-11-2011 03:56 PM)Zatamon Wrote:  cufflink, that photo on the video link sure brings back memories. I started playing in symphonic orchestras when I was 16 and have played, on and off, ever since (intermixed with chamber music trios and quartets).

The only thing that beats listening to music is being part of it -- you can actually feel the music going through you, surrounding you and flowing out of you at the same time.

A truly spiritual experience. Smile

I couldn't agree more.

I'm reminded of how Eliot put it in The Dry Salvages:

. . . music heard so deeply
That it is not heard at all, but you are the music
While the music lasts.

Religious disputes are like arguments in a madhouse over which inmate really is Napoleon.
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09-11-2011, 05:36 PM
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
(09-11-2011 03:40 PM)cufflink Wrote:  Hey bemore,

Glad to see you like the 2nd movement of the Beethoven Seventh. A friend of mine once told me that's the music he wants to be played at his memorial service (hopefully not too soon).

Do you know the rest of the symphony? The fourth (last) movement is a wild ride. (Some of Beethoven's contemporaries thought it had been composed in a "drunken fury.") This is a mind-blowing performance:

Hey Cufflink.

In the past I have tried to get into classical music by buying various CDs.....like most music though you have to be in the mood for it and quite oddly my moods couldnt appreciate most of them.....at that time I didnt have the patience although now I think I may have a little bit more and will have another go.

I hadnt listened to the last movement so thank you for sharing......it is definitly very rousing isnt it. One thing I would like to ask you (or Zat) is about composers. I know that they are there for timing purposes....to help the orchestra but I dont really see how???

If you or Zat have any more reccomendations of any classical works I would love to hear them please.

For no matter how much I use these symbols, to describe symptoms of my existence.
You are your own emphasis.
So I say nothing.

-Bemore.
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09-11-2011, 07:42 PM
 
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
(09-11-2011 05:36 PM)bemore Wrote:  One thing I would like to ask you (or Zat) is about composers. I know that they are there for timing purposes....to help the orchestra but I dont really see how???

bemore, I am sure you meant the 'conductor'.

(s)he is the heart and the brain of the orchestra. When you play your instrument, in whichever section you are in, you keep one eye on the conductor, almost all the time.

The conductor's hands and gestures tell you everything that the music is meant to be at the moment: not just speed, but tone, mood, passion, serenity -- and he is also coordinating all the sections to 'sculpt' the music into a perfect expression of the composer's vision.

Members of a symphonic orchestra either love or hate their conductor, depending on how a good job (s)he is doing. In an orchestra we all want to make music perfect and look upon our conductor to make it happen.

I could go on about this for hours, because I played with so many symphonic orchestras and observed so many conductors: some tyrannical and driving us like slaves, some real pussycats and anything in between.

It is a completely new world, inside the orchestra, to those who only hear the performances, but never took part in rehearsals, session practices, the pre-performance "death march" and the final triumph when the curtain goes down and you hear the audience's reaction to all those weeks/months of hard work.
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09-11-2011, 08:17 PM (This post was last modified: 09-11-2011 08:24 PM by cufflink.)
RE: The Ultimate CHILL music thread.
(09-11-2011 05:36 PM)bemore Wrote:  One thing I would like to ask you (or Zat) is about composers. I know that they are there for timing purposes....to help the orchestra but I dont really see how???

Sure. I can offer some thoughts, and perhaps Zat will as well.

You wrote "composers," but I think you meant "conductors," right? Smile Anyway, here's how I would explain what a conductor does:

In the world of western classical music, most of the great composers are dead, although their music lives on. Beethoven died in 1827. His Seventh Symphony (out of a total of nine) was first performed in 1813. So in what form does that symphony exist? Well, it exists in the form of notes on a page--a musical score, which is a set of detailed written instructions. In the case of a symphony for orchestra, those instructions include every single note to be played; what instruments play what notes; what the rhythm should be; how loud or how soft a particular section should be; and the overall basic tempo of a movement or section within a movement (from very slow to very fast).

That's what the composer provides. It's up to the performer or performers to bring those ink smudges to life. And that's where the conductor comes in. What the composer--in our case, Beethoven--provides is necessary but not sufficient for a performance. If it were, then every performance would sound exactly like every other one, and there would be no point in different conductors and different orchestras recording the same piece of music over and over again.

If you think about it, there's a parallel in popular music. You can have 3 different singers doing a cover of someone else's song. Do they all do it exactly the same way? Not at all. Each one brings something of his or her own to the song.

In the same way, the conductor is the one who provides the overall "vision" for the music. Take tempo, for example. Composers provide a general indication of how fast or slow something should go (typically by using Italian terms that translate to "fast and lively," "moderately," "very slowly," etc.). And after a certain point they began providing metronome marks (based on a device that ticks off beats at regular intervals) to be more precise. But although conductors can't ever change the notes a composer has written, they do have some leeway when it comes to tempo. Two conductors will look at the same piece of music and "feel" it differently: one hears it just a touch faster than the other, say. And that can make a big difference in how the final product sounds. It's not a question of right and wrong; it's a question of artistic interpretation.

There's also the question of emphasis. In a certain passage, should the trumpets come out the strongest? Or is the violin part more important at that point? It's up to the conductor to decide that. If it's the violins, he might tell them to play louder while telling the trumpeters to scale it back. And he (or she) needs to make such decisions for every moment of the performance.

And then, as you mentioned, there's the question of keeping everyone together. How do you get everyone to start together, speed up together, slow down together, end together? When a piece is written for small groups of players (duets, trios, quartets, etc.), a conductor usually isn't needed: the performers can take care of those things by themselves--by looking at each other during the performance and by discussing their interpretation beforehand in rehearsal. But when you have a huge orchestra on stage, that's not possible: there has to be a director that everyone can turn to for the cues.

Once you get to know a piece of music well, it's amazing what you'll discover when you listen to different recordings of it. I've had the experience many times of listening to a new (for me) performance of a symphony that I thought I knew backwards and forwards and discovering new things in it that I hadn't heard before--a little three-second tune on the flute, say, that every other conductor had kept in the background but that this one brought forward and emphasized, or a pause that lasts just a little longer than usual which makes the music that follows more meaningful.

One of the great things about classical music is that it's not subject to fashion. It doesn't go out of style. The Beethoven Seventh is just shy of 200 years old, but it's just as alive as it was when Beethoven composed it and it still speaks to us. And different conductors can continue to show you new things in it.

Quote:If you or Zat have any more reccomendations of any classical works I would love to hear them please.

That's a hard one. I have a thousand recommendations, but I don't know the kind of music you gravitate towards. Do you like singing--songs, choral music, opera? Do you like symphonic music for large orchestras or instrumental music for smaller groups (often called "chamber music")? How about solo keyboard music? And what about style? Music from different periods can sound very different. If you could let us know a little more about what you enjoy, we could come up with better recommendations.

EDIT: Zat, I just saw your post. I think we're on the same page. Wink

Religious disputes are like arguments in a madhouse over which inmate really is Napoleon.
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