The Writer of Luke & Acts
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17-02-2015, 10:00 AM (This post was last modified: 17-02-2015 11:19 AM by Free.)
The Writer of Luke & Acts
This may not be of interest to many of you, but being the kind of person I am I simply needed to investigate this issue to figure out what the truth actually is. So the question that many NT Scholars ask is:

Who Was The Author Of Luke & Acts?

No one seems to know for sure who wrote those two NT books, and they have always been erroneously attributed to Luke. But there has never been any kind of decent evidence at all to support Luke as being the author.

So I decided to investigate it more closely to see if there is any hint within Acts as to who actually wrote it, which would also tell us who wrote Luke since both almost certainly have been written by the same author.

I decided to look up all examples of a single word: "We." What I was looking for was any instances where the word "we" would appear in a 1st Person Narrative.

I was not disappointed. I knew I was on to something almost immediately.

The first time we see the 1st person narrative being used by the author of Acts is in the following verse:

Act_16:10 And after he saw the vision, we immediately tried to go into Macedonia, gathering that the Lord had called us in order to preach the gospel to them.

So now that I found the first instance of a 1st person narrative, I had to find out who the we actually was, as it had to be someone who was with Paul previous to that first instance. This is what I found just a few verses previous:

Silas Is with Paul:

Act 15:40 But choosing Silas, Paul went out, being commended by the brothers to the grace of God,

So with that established, we move forward.


1st Person Narrative begins when Silas is with Paul:

Act_16:10 And after he saw the vision, we immediately tried to go into Macedonia, gathering that the Lord had called us in order to preach the gospel to them.

Act_16:11 Then having set sail from Troas, we came with a straight course to Samothracia, and the next day to Neapolis;

Act_16:12 and from there to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, a colony. And we continued spending time in that city some days.

Act_16:13 And on the sabbath we went out of the city by a river side, where prayer was usually made. And we sat down and spoke to the women who came together there.

Act_16:16 And as we went to prayer, it happened that a certain girl possessed with a spirit of divination met us, who brought her masters much gain by divining.


It was when Silas was with Paul that we see all instances of the 1st person narrative. So we then continue ...


Silas Continues With Paul:

Act_16:19 And when her masters saw that the hope of their gain went out, having seized Paul and Silas, they dragged them to the market before the rulers.

Act_16:25 And toward midnight Paul and Silas prayed and praised God in a hymn. And the prisoners listened to them.

Act_16:29 Then asking for a light he rushed in and fell trembling before Paul and Silas.

Act_17:4 And some of them believed and joined themselves to Paul and Silas, both a great multitude of the worshiping Greeks, and not a few of the chief women.

Act_17:10 And the brothers immediately sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea. They, when they arrived, went into the synagogue of the Jews.


Silas is with Paul up to this point, and this is when the 1st person narrative stops. The next verses show why:


Silas is Separated from Paul - 1st Person Narrative Stops:

Act 17:14 And then immediately the brothers sent Paul away to go towards the sea, but both Silas and Timothy stayed there.

The 1st person narrative ends when Silas and Paul are separated. Then we continue on a again ...


Silas Is Now Again With Paul:

Act 18:5 And when Silas and Timothy had come from Macedonia, Paul was pressed in the spirit and testified to the Jews that Jesus is the Christ.

Silas is now back with paul, and then within a few verses the 1st person narrative resumes:

1st Person Narrative Resumes While Silas Is With Paul

Act_20:13 And going ahead onto the ship, we sailed to Assos, there intending to take in Paul; for so he had appointed, intending himself to go on foot.

Act_20:14 And when he met with us at Assos, we took him in and came to Mitylene.

Act_20:15 And we sailed from there and came the next day across from Chios. And the next day we arrived at Samos, and we stayed at Trogyllium. And the next day we came to Miletus.


So who can we eliminate as also being a possible author and 1st persaon narrator?

Verses Below Eliminate Timothy As The Narrator, Since It Shows The 1st Person Narrative Stating That Timothy "waited for us in Troas."

Act 20:4 And Sopater of Berea accompanied him into Asia, and Aristarchus and Secundus of the Thessalonians, and Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy, and Tychicus and Trophimus as far as Asia.

Act 20:5 Going before, these waited for us at Troas.



So I will now briefly summarize my points on this.

Point 1: The 1st person narrative is only ever utilized when Silas is with Paul.

Point 2: When Silas is not with Paul, the 1st personal narrative ends until Silas is with Paul again.

Point 3: There is no mention of Luke at all in Acts.

Point 4: Timothy has been eliminated as the 1st person narrator.


Point 5: In many instances where the 1st person narrative is used, we see only Paul and Silas traveling together.

Point 6: Silas is not recorded as being separated from Paul again, and in instances were the actions of Paul alone are described- such as being imprisoned- the 1st person narrative or the word "we" are not used.


Conclusion:

The evidence indicates that the most likely candidate as the author of both the Gospel of Luke & Acts is none other than Silas. The narrator of Acts only uses the 1st person narrative when Silas is with Paul, and it is never used at any other time.


I have cross checked this numerous times, and tried to debunk it and have not been successful.

But I need some of you who are well learned to check out my findings and see if you can either confirm what I have learned, or dispute it.

Either way works for me.

Thanks.

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17-02-2015, 12:00 PM
RE: The Writer of Luke & Acts
(17-02-2015 10:00 AM)Free Wrote:  This may not be of interest to many of you, but being the kind of person I am I simply needed to investigate this issue to figure out what the truth actually is. So the question that many NT Scholars ask is:

Who Was The Author Of Luke & Acts?

No one seems to know for sure who wrote those two NT books, and they have always been erroneously attributed to Luke. But there has never been any kind of decent evidence at all to support Luke as being the author.

So I decided to investigate it more closely to see if there is any hint within Acts as to who actually wrote it, which would also tell us who wrote Luke since both almost certainly have been written by the same author.

I decided to look up all examples of a single word: "We." What I was looking for was any instances where the word "we" would appear in a 1st Person Narrative.

I was not disappointed. I knew I was on to something almost immediately.

The first time we see the 1st person narrative being used by the author of Acts is in the following verse:

Act_16:10 And after he saw the vision, we immediately tried to go into Macedonia, gathering that the Lord had called us in order to preach the gospel to them.

So now that I found the first instance of a 1st person narrative, I had to find out who the we actually was, as it had to be someone who was with Paul previous to that first instance. This is what I found just a few verses previous:

Silas Is with Paul:

Act 15:40 But choosing Silas, Paul went out, being commended by the brothers to the grace of God,

So with that established, we move forward.


1st Person Narrative begins when Silas is with Paul:

Act_16:10 And after he saw the vision, we immediately tried to go into Macedonia, gathering that the Lord had called us in order to preach the gospel to them.

Act_16:11 Then having set sail from Troas, we came with a straight course to Samothracia, and the next day to Neapolis;

Act_16:12 and from there to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, a colony. And we continued spending time in that city some days.

Act_16:13 And on the sabbath we went out of the city by a river side, where prayer was usually made. And we sat down and spoke to the women who came together there.

Act_16:16 And as we went to prayer, it happened that a certain girl possessed with a spirit of divination met us, who brought her masters much gain by divining.


It was when Silas was with Paul that we see all instances of the 1st person narrative. So we then continue ...


Silas Continues With Paul:

Act_16:19 And when her masters saw that the hope of their gain went out, having seized Paul and Silas, they dragged them to the market before the rulers.

Act_16:25 And toward midnight Paul and Silas prayed and praised God in a hymn. And the prisoners listened to them.

Act_16:29 Then asking for a light he rushed in and fell trembling before Paul and Silas.

Act_17:4 And some of them believed and joined themselves to Paul and Silas, both a great multitude of the worshiping Greeks, and not a few of the chief women.

Act_17:10 And the brothers immediately sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea. They, when they arrived, went into the synagogue of the Jews.


Silas is with Paul up to this point, and this is when the 1st person narrative stops. The next verses show why:


Silas is Separated from Paul - 1st Person Narrative Stops:

Act 17:14 And then immediately the brothers sent Paul away to go towards the sea, but both Silas and Timothy stayed there.

The 1st person narrative ends when Silas and Paul are separated. Then we continue on a again ...


Silas Is Now Again With Paul:

Act 18:5 And when Silas and Timothy had come from Macedonia, Paul was pressed in the spirit and testified to the Jews that Jesus is the Christ.

Silas is now back with paul, and then within a few verses the 1st person narrative resumes:

1st Person Narrative Resumes While Silas Is With Paul

Act_20:13 And going ahead onto the ship, we sailed to Assos, there intending to take in Paul; for so he had appointed, intending himself to go on foot.

Act_20:14 And when he met with us at Assos, we took him in and came to Mitylene.

Act_20:15 And we sailed from there and came the next day across from Chios. And the next day we arrived at Samos, and we stayed at Trogyllium. And the next day we came to Miletus.


So who can we eliminate as also being a possible author and 1st persaon narrator?

Verses Below Eliminate Timothy As The Narrator, Since It Shows The 1st Person Narrative Stating That Timothy "waited for us in Troas."

Act 20:4 And Sopater of Berea accompanied him into Asia, and Aristarchus and Secundus of the Thessalonians, and Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy, and Tychicus and Trophimus as far as Asia.

Act 20:5 Going before, these waited for us at Troas.



So I will now briefly summarize my points on this.

Point 1: The 1st person narrative is only ever utilized when Silas is with Paul.

Point 2: When Silas is not with Paul, the 1st personal narrative ends until Silas is with Paul again.

Point 3: There is no mention of Luke at all in Acts.

Point 4: Timothy has been eliminated as the 1st person narrator.


Point 5: In many instances where the 1st person narrative is used, we see only Paul and Silas traveling together.

Point 6: Silas is not recorded as being separated from Paul again, and in instances were the actions of Paul alone are described- such as being imprisoned- the 1st person narrative or the word "we" are not used.


Conclusion:

The evidence indicates that the most likely candidate as the author of both the Gospel of Luke & Acts is none other than Silas. The narrator of Acts only uses the 1st person narrative when Silas is with Paul, and it is never used at any other time.


I have cross checked this numerous times, and tried to debunk it and have not been successful.

But I need some of you who are well learned to check out my findings and see if you can either confirm what I have learned, or dispute it.

Either way works for me.

Thanks.

I like this. Why not? The "gospel of Silas". Has a nice ring to it... Silas or Luke, though, we hear more about medicine in these two books than from Hippocrates, which is interesting...

I'm told atheists on forums like TTA are bitter and angry. If you are not, your posts to me will be respectful, insightful and thoughtful. Prove me wrong by your adherence to decent behavior.
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