The definition of the word "god"
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02-03-2010, 07:48 AM
 
The definition of the word "god"
Heya, i've been having some trouble lately trying to find a good definition of a god, since it's a word that's pretty much left open for interpretation. However, i've found two that both sound good and i'm wandering which definition you guys think sounds better:

1. God, Supreme Being (the supernatural being conceived as the perfect and omnipotent and omniscient originator and ruler of the universe; the object of worship in monotheistic religions)

or

2. God, any supernatural being worshiped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force.

All feedback appreciated.
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02-03-2010, 09:37 AM
 
RE: The definition of the word "god"
Here's what Wikipedia has to say about 'god':

God is the English name given to a singular omnipotent being in theistic and deistic religions (and other belief systems) whom is either the sole deity in monotheism, or a principal deity in polytheism.[1]

God is most often conceived of as the supernatural creator and overseer of the universe. Theologians have ascribed a variety of attributes to the many different conceptions of God. The most common among these include omniscience, omnipotence, omnipresence, omnibenevolence (perfect goodness), divine simplicity, and eternal and necessary existence. God has also been conceived as being incorporeal, a personal being, the source of all moral obligation, and the "greatest conceivable existent".

Article can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God

Then, there's Richard Dawkin's definition (well, his personal feeling anyway):

“The God of the Old Testament is arguably the most unpleasant character in all fiction: jealous and proud of it; a petty, unjust, unforgiving control-freak; a vindictive, bloodthirsty ethnic cleanser; a misogynistic, homophobic, racist, infanticidal, genocidal, filicidal, pestilential, megalomaniacal, sadomasochistic, capriciously malevolent bully.”
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02-03-2010, 11:18 AM
RE: The definition of the word "god"
The definition of "god" changes from person to person. There's no real point in trying to find a universal term. It's like trying to nail jelly to a wall.

"Sometimes it is better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness."
- Terry Pratchett
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02-03-2010, 12:23 PM
 
RE: The definition of the word "god"
But still, a general definition wouldn't be completely useless. I like the 2nd one you gave:

God, any supernatural being worshiped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force.

I think it's quite general.
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02-03-2010, 12:41 PM
RE: The definition of the word "god"
(02-03-2010 12:23 PM)Nahuel Wrote:  But still, a general definition wouldn't be completely useless. I like the 2nd one you gave:

God, any supernatural being worshiped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force.

I think it's quite general.

Many gods are not the personification of forces, though. Odin, for example, was just a dude. A dude with magic powers, but just a dude.

"Sometimes it is better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness."
- Terry Pratchett
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02-03-2010, 04:17 PM
 
RE: The definition of the word "god"
Hi

Bongo Rock have a new video out - check it out

[youtube]AwbuKpzn7Yw[/youtube]

thanks
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02-03-2010, 06:22 PM
RE: The definition of the word "god"
Hard to say, but I think intelligence is important in a god. It has to be significantly powerful too, and have some form of unity.

I don't believe Jesus is the son of God until I see the long form birth certificate!
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02-03-2010, 06:36 PM
RE: The definition of the word "god"
(02-03-2010 04:17 PM)justwhoarebongorock Wrote:  Hi

Bongo Rock have a new video out - check it out

[youtube]AwbuKpzn7Yw[/youtube]

thanks

Obvious bot is obvious.

"Sometimes it is better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness."
- Terry Pratchett
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02-03-2010, 06:39 PM
 
RE: The definition of the word "god"
(02-03-2010 12:41 PM)Unbeliever Wrote:  
(02-03-2010 12:23 PM)Nahuel Wrote:  But still, a general definition wouldn't be completely useless. I like the 2nd one you gave:

God, any supernatural being worshiped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force.

I think it's quite general.

Many gods are not the personification of forces, though. Odin, for example, was just a dude. A dude with magic powers, but just a dude.


Well, it never says anywhere that he is the personification of any one force or part of life, but if you read Snorra-Edda (Icelandic book, about 800 years old, a good source of information about norse mythology) you can read from that text that he's sort of a personification for wisdom. You can hardly find any description of him where it isn't stated that he's the wisest of all the gods.

But, like i said, it isn't stated anywhere directly.
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02-03-2010, 06:42 PM
RE: The definition of the word "god"
(02-03-2010 06:39 PM)New Frontier Wrote:  
(02-03-2010 12:41 PM)Unbeliever Wrote:  
(02-03-2010 12:23 PM)Nahuel Wrote:  But still, a general definition wouldn't be completely useless. I like the 2nd one you gave:

God, any supernatural being worshiped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force.

I think it's quite general.

Many gods are not the personification of forces, though. Odin, for example, was just a dude. A dude with magic powers, but just a dude.


Well, it never says anywhere that he is the personification of any one force or part of life, but if you read Snorra-Edda (Icelandic book, about 800 years old, a good source of information about norse mythology) you can read from that text that he's sort of a personification for wisdom. You can hardly find any description of him where it isn't stated that he's the wisest of all the gods.

But, like i said, it isn't stated anywhere directly.

Really? Didn't know that. But in any case, I still think the "personification" bit isn't necessary. The rest of it would work. "A supernatural being that controls some part of the world or aspect of life".

"Sometimes it is better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness."
- Terry Pratchett
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