The elegant nature of science
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10-11-2013, 12:33 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(09-11-2013 10:07 PM)kim Wrote:  
(08-11-2013 11:01 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  No. The person was a news anchor.

As of the mid-1980s, there were no reports in peer-reviewed medical literature describing "gerbilling".

Should this entry be moved to the conspiracy forums? Dodgy

I know he (Dr. P) never published it. He's too busy to write up cases, (I assume). He would NEVER disclose a name to anyone, or talk about a patient, with a name attached. I found out almost accidentally. But I also know it happened, and who was involved. It was not an actor. It happened in the last few years.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

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10-11-2013, 03:27 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
I don't know if anyone has posted this (too many pages to look through) but Michael Mosley's series The Story of Science is an excellent introduction to the history of Western science.

Episode One: What Is Out There?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pii_PVrYpOw

Episode Two: What is the World Made Of?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IG5YNBJhQuo

Episode Three: How Did We Get Here?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LVWuPHLiCw

Episode Four: Can We Have Unlimited Power?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1lb-WlEiJw

Episode Five: What Is the Secret of Life?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkTUBH0Vb84

Episode Six: Who Are We?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5sfACdOej8

The history of science is important because:
--it demonstrates how difficult it was to acquire the knowledge that we have
today;
--it is filled with many elegant and ingenious experiments; and
--it helps preserve the memory of some truly great humans.

The Story of Science - Episode 2: What is the World Made Of? documents the life and death of Antoine Lavoisier. I think driving Alan Turing to suicide and beheading Lavoisier were amongst two of the biggest mistakes humans have made in the history of science and technology. When I think of what may have been I feel a tinge of sorrow.

This idea is in one sense a truism but in another sense profound: humans have learnt everything that they have about the universe and themselves on their own. I think you come to appreciate the full significance of this when you read the history of science and technology. Humans have had no help from anywhere--not aliens, not demons, not Satan, not gods. The first Homo sapiens were not given a manual of basic science. No scripture communicates anything useful. If the Torah had a primitive periodic table of elements that not only would have provided indirect evidence of special origin it would also have helped humans. Yahweh could have told the patriarchs "This means nothing to you now but you must transcribe it accurately and in time your descendenta will realise its value". No such luck. Instead a bunch of myths and rules.
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25-11-2013, 12:26 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Horsetail spores found able to 'walk' and 'jump'.

"A trio of researches working at University Grenoble in France has discovered that spores produced by horsetail plants are able to move around using "legs" known as elaters. The spores, which have a central bulb surrounded by four independent elaters, are heavily impacted by the amount of moisture in the air. During times of high humidity, the elaters curl up, much like human hair—when the air dries out, so too do the elaters, allowing the curls to relax. It was this curling and relaxing that caused the spores to move in their environment—as the elaters unfurled against the ground, it caused the entire spore to move. More intriguingly, they found that on some occasions, the elaters uncurled so fast that it caused the entire spore to be pushed up into the air. Such jumps, the researchers noted, sometimes reached heights of centimeters—more than enough to allow the spore to leap into passing air currents, carrying them to a far flung locale."

The video is just awesome.




"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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28-11-2013, 04:24 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Looks like Comet ISON bought it. http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy..._chat.html

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01-12-2013, 03:48 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
"If you place 32 metronomes on a static object and set them rocking out of phase with one another, they will remain that way indefinitely. Place them on a moveable surface, however, and something very interesting (and very mesmerizing) happens.

The metronomes in this video fall into the latter camp. Energy from the motion of one ticking metronome can affect the motion of every metronome around it, while the motion of every other metronome affects the motion of our original metronome right back. All this inter-metranome "communication" is facilitated by the board, which serves as an energetic intermediary between all the metronomes that rest upon its surface. The metronomes in this video (which are really just pendulums, or, if you want to get really technical, oscillators) are said to be "coupled."

Rather cool to watch indeed.





However, if I read one more comment or see one more stupid fb post about how crooked stuff is messing up one's "OCD", I'll *&@#*. OCD is not about liking things straight and your room - really tidy, nor is it about making sure that your hands are washed really well. It's not a cute little quirk, that makes you seem oh-so-cool when you're gossiping with your girlfriends in the mall (or whatever it is people of this caliber do). It's ugly and intrusive, and always with you, if not wreaking havoc with your brain at this particular moment, then lurking in the background, ready to pounce again.

/rant. As you were. Rolleyes

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02-12-2013, 12:22 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
"The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you're more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bacteria and fungi in and on our bodies than there are human cells."





I think my cynical microbes must be under attack from some sort of cutesy bug or something. And it feels mildly unsettling, to say the least. Unsure

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04-12-2013, 01:54 PM (This post was last modified: 04-12-2013 08:04 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
Fascinating new (epi)genetic research that shows individual epigentic changes, which result from experiences, (learning) CAN be passed on genetically to offspring, and that it explains a little that there can be far faster periods of Evolutionary change. Darwin was only partly right. It's NOT all really "random" change. Epigenetic "switches" being turned on and off, and affecting gene behavior is FAR more important than they ever thought.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...131439.htm

Oldest huminin DNA yet found, announced today.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/05/scienc...ience&_r=0

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

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05-12-2013, 12:52 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
I put this up on another thread but I really think it needs some exposure here...
I have been looking at sites with snowflakes lately - here is a great snowflake site to explore for a look at snowflakes with an electron microscope. We're talking really, really, small snowflakes here; the snowflake crystals that form on snowflakes!

[Image: 05219.jpg]
The structures are fascinating...
[Image: 12495.jpg]
They could be giant buildings...
[Image: 13371.jpg]

I've spent a lot of time on this site and this is the BEST part - THE STEREO IMAGES!

Don't forget to cross your eyes, relax, and focus on the middle image. Shy

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
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07-12-2013, 05:20 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
This is so frickin amazing. The future of cancer treatment ??
http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/07/health/coh...cer-study/

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

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19-12-2013, 10:26 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
How come we didn't hear about this on the US news ?
Looks like others have taken the lead in science.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaia_%28spacecraft%29
http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/18/world/euro...telescope/

Amazing data should come from this.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

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