The elegant nature of science
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06-05-2015, 02:36 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Physics World Nanotechnology Digital Supplement, for yer reading pleasure. Wink

http://live.iop-pp01.agh.sleek.net/physi...ology-2015

living word
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09-05-2015, 11:45 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
I see skies of blue and clouds of white... Heart

"One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free."

[Image: cloudyearth_1600.jpg.CROP.original-original.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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18-05-2015, 01:39 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Starry, starry night...

Kinda cool, wish I could see it in 3D...

"Van Gogh’s explorations of light and color blazed a luminescent path upon which subsequent artists have spent entire careers following to varying—but never equal—degrees of success. His brilliance lies in the ability to evoke a dream-like sense, in which objects, landscapes, and people appear both intimately real and hauntingly “other.” His paintings are textured (in terms of both “layers of meaning,” as well as globs of paint) in such a way as to make an observer want to crawl inside and explore every inch of the world as van Gogh saw it, full of warmth and color.

And now you can.

As part of this year’s Oculus’ Mobile VR Jam, developer Mac Cauley has rendered an entire virtual environment based on van Gogh’s iconic 1888 painting Le café de nuit. Cauley’s “The Night Cafe” is as close as a person can get to being immersed in the ambient glow of van Gogh’s world"





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03-06-2015, 07:38 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
"Chimps not only have the brain power to understand the concept of cooked food, but they are willing to delay eating raw food if they know it can be cooked. This highlights impressive cognitive abilities, such as the foresight and patience to resist their urge of eating food.

An experiment showed that when given a functional oven and a non-functioning oven, chimps always placed the potatoes in the functioning one – in other words, they preferred cooked potatoes. It was already known that chimps prefer cooked food, so researchers took things one step further: they gave the chimps raw potatoes; before they were shown the concept of cooking, they simply took the potato and ate it, but once they had been introduced to cooking, they chose not to eat it wait for it to be cooked."


"So why don't chimps cook? Not being able to control fire is one reason and another, according to Dr Warneken, is that cooking requires what he describes as "social skills" that chimps don't possess.

By social skills he is not alluding to their unremarkable table manners nor their lack of witty dinner party conversation. Rather, it is their inability to trust others in their social groups not to steal their food while they are preparing to cook it that he is referring and it is this he believes is one of the key factors holding them back from being able to cook. Gulping something down as soon as you have foraged it is the surest way of keeping it safe.

According to Dr Warneken, his experiments show that that most of the mental skills needed to cook were there in human ancestors between 5 to 7 million years ago and so all it took for the first emergence of the culinary arts was the controlled use of fire and the ability to trust other people not to pinch our food while our back was turned."


Take this raw foodiots Drinking Beverage

[Image: Perfectly_timed_photos_80.jpg]

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03-06-2015, 08:04 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Life finds a way...

"The smalltooth sawfish, one of the world's most threatened marine fish species, may have come up with a plan B.

Populations of this Atlantic Ocean ray are so low that it's possible some are producing young through a process known as "virgin birth," in which the females can fertilize their eggs without sperm.

Seven immature smalltooth sawfish likely entered the world in this way, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Current Biology.”

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/...s-science/

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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04-06-2015, 07:54 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(03-06-2015 08:04 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Life finds a way...

Speaking of which - just how depraved are those scientists to call the purest of all pure critters, an evolutionary scandal? Sick, moral-less bastards, the lot of them! Angry

"Sex is, on the whole, a good thing. I know it, you know it, and natural selection knows it. But try telling it to bdelloid rotifers. These small invertebrates have survived without sex for some 80 million years. While many animals, from aphids to Komodo dragons, can reproduce asexually from time to time, it’s incredibly rare to find a group that have abandoned sex altogether. The bdelloid rotifers (pronounced with a silent b) are an exception.
They live in an all-female world and since their discovery, not a single male has ever been found. Genetic studies have confirmed that they are permanently asexual, and females reproduce by spawning clone daughters that are genetically identical to them.
The bdelloids pose a problem for evolutionary biologists, who have struggled to explain how they could make do without a strategy that serves the rest of the animal kingdom very well."


Also, "roughly 10% of the bdelloids' active genes were pilfered from other species, such as fungi, bacteria, and plants." And some people have the gall to say females are less prone to crime. Ha!

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go resurrect a thread - all this sex talk has put me into a necroposting mood Angel

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05-06-2015, 11:58 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2...-of-brazil

http://www.livescience.com/topics/newfound-species/

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/...-in-canada

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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05-06-2015, 01:11 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Kermit the Frog is real so we were right to believe in him all along therefore Jesus... or something...

http://www.livescience.com/50686-new-spe...iders.html

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09-06-2015, 06:26 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Origin-of-Life Story May Have Found Its Missing Link

“The new research — which involves two studies, one led by Charles Carter and one led by Richard Wolfenden, both of the University of North Carolina — suggests a way for RNA to control the production of proteins by working with simple amino acids that does not require the more complex enzymes that exist today."

http://www.livescience.com/51106-origin-...2015-06-09

I don’t understand all the intricacies but another step towards figuring it out.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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13-06-2015, 08:02 AM (This post was last modified: 13-06-2015 10:43 AM by Vera.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
I have an inordinate love (no, not of squirting cucumbers Dodgy ) of slow-motion movies of plants!






Also, in light of World Oceans Day: the smallest shark, dwarf lantern shark. It's tiny and it glows in the dark. What's not to love! Heart

[Image: 2007-3716%20Smallest%20Shark.jpg?itok=BJyWMV-I]




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