The elegant nature of science
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28-08-2015, 08:28 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Quote:To crack the mystery of why and how people around the world came to believe in moralizing gods, researchers are using a novel tool in religious studies: the scientific method. By combining laboratory experiments, cross-cultural fieldwork, and analysis of the historical record, an interdisciplinary team has put forward a hypothesis that has the small community of researchers who study the evolution of religion abuzz.

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28-08-2015, 09:32 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(28-08-2015 08:28 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  
Quote:To crack the mystery of why and how people around the world came to believe in moralizing gods, researchers are using a novel tool in religious studies: the scientific method. By combining laboratory experiments, cross-cultural fieldwork, and analysis of the historical record, an interdisciplinary team has put forward a hypothesis that has the small community of researchers who study the evolution of religion abuzz.

Thumbsup I like this article.
I have always thought social behavior to be natural ... amongst social creatures...
Quote: Norenzayan thinks this connection between moralizing deities and “prosocial” behavior—curbing self-interest for the good of others—could help explain how religion evolved. In small-scale societies, prosocial behavior does not depend on religion. The Hadza, a group of African hunter-gatherers, do not believe in an afterlife, for example, and their gods of the sun and moon are indifferent to the paltry actions of people. Yet the Hadza are very cooperative when it comes to hunting and daily life. They don’t need a supernatural force to encourage this, because everyone knows everyone else in their small bands. If you steal or lie, everyone will find out—and they might not want to cooperate with you anymore, Norenzayan says. The danger of a damaged reputation keeps people living up to the community’s standards.


The article then goes on to relate how this prosicial behavior breaks down when a society becomes too big to make sure people don't get left on the sidelines.

First comes the natural behavior, then comes the controlling behavior to enforce well being. Angry Cooperate happily for the good of all or you're fucked!

Not much anxiety there. Wink

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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28-08-2015, 11:56 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
[Image: ICCx93c.png]

http://www.evxventures.com/the-immortus.html

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31-08-2015, 06:46 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Saturday night's line-up. Evil_monster

[Image: Wf3De9t.jpg]

http://www.sciencealert.com/three-catego...-same-time

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01-09-2015, 10:01 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Quote:An interesting question, then, is whether the thermodynamic consequences of the second law extend to information. Is it possible to extract useful mechanical work from a system just by observing its state? If so, how much? And at a more fundamental level, are the thermodynamic and information entropies related?

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01-09-2015, 01:18 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
[Image: xgeOiuz.jpg]

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02-09-2015, 07:32 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
“I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts.” RP Feynman

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." -Albert Einstein
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02-09-2015, 08:09 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(02-09-2015 07:32 PM)Ted Tucker Wrote:  “I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts.” RP Feynman

The first thing that comes to mind is 'beauty is in the eye of the beholder'.

Different people find beauty in different ways. You friend sounds a little snobby - that his kind of appreciation for beauty is better than yours...which is crap.

You can go to the mountains with a group of people and each will have different things that catch their attention - perhaps one is mesmerized by a waterfall, another by the vista, another by sunrise/set, and yet another by the geology of the area. None discount the value of the others.

If we all liked the same things for the same reasons it would be an awfully dull world.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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02-09-2015, 08:15 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
I've used Feynman's argument against people who pull that on me (usually during evolution discussions) for years, except I prefer to use the sunset as an example because it's easier to explain all the physics of that one than to explain it for flowers.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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04-09-2015, 09:51 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
NASA release of super high resolution image the Andromeda Galaxy. Wow! Oh I forgot, we're the center of the universe...not.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udAL48P5NJU

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." -Albert Einstein
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