The elegant nature of science
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09-05-2016, 08:26 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
This is a graph showing the peak of cherry blossoms in Japan. Notice how in recent time the peak is moving earlier in the year. In my view just another indicator of global warming.

[Image: image_n%2Fi1540-9295-10-6-285-f02.png?l=...;amp;a=wol]
"Old court diaries provide a long-term record of dates of cherry blossom festivals in Kyoto, Japan. (a) This diary of Tokistune Hiramatsu, a well-known court figure of the Edo Era, provides the following entry on April 14, 1644: “In Seiryoden Palace, Kyoto, we enjoyed watching cherry blossoms and took sake provided by the emperor”. The translation of the highlighted sentence is shown in red; the black entry is the date, according to the Japanese calendar. (b) A running 10-year average of cherry blossom peak flowering in Kyoto. Images from Primack et al. (2009) and Primack and Higuchi (2007) using image and data provided by Y Aono, Osaka Prefecture University.”

Citizen scientists have been collecting data for centuries. It hasn’t been until recently that there has been a differentiation between professional and amateur data gathering. I bring this up because in the paper I’m co-authoring the senior author is balking at using the term ‘citizen scientist’ for a data set collected by the public. Dodgy I sent him the paper hyperlinked below. It turns out that such luminary organization as NASA, National Geographic, National Weather Service, Cornell University etc readily use data collected by citizen scientists. Hopefully we will resolve this soon and publish in the next few months.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1890/110278/full

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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12-05-2016, 05:11 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Swarm Intelligence, The Kentucky Derby and a software program called UNU

“We’ve been blown away by how smart UNU has been in prior predictions, but when the horses crossed the line I almost didn’t believe it, especially since we put ourselves out there by publishing the picks. And here’s the amazing thing — while the Swarm A.I. got the picks perfect, not a single individual who participated in the swarm got the picks right on their own — not one.”

http://news.discovery.com/tech/robotics/...160512.htm

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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12-05-2016, 05:39 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
I like visuals.

[Image: unnamed.jpg]

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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12-05-2016, 09:31 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science


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18-05-2016, 08:23 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
[Image: spiral_optimized.gif]

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/ener...ge%2Fstory

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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18-05-2016, 08:37 PM (This post was last modified: 18-05-2016 09:44 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story...=129777531

But to be fair, in a way, horse people already knew this.
The winner is usually (95 % +) in the top 5 odds, statistically.
So the question is, "How do they pick their people who participate in the swarm ?"

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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19-05-2016, 02:44 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
[Image: bi_graphics_20-cognitive-biases-that-scr...1461070445]

http://bigthink.com/robby-berman/a-chart...1462299913

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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26-05-2016, 07:06 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
“Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build’

"Here's a mystery found in a French cave. It appears that a group of Neanderthals walked into that cave about 176,000 years ago and started building something. Neanderthals were our closest living relatives but they weren't known as builders or cave explorers.

Scientists identify the forms as “constructions,” but they can't figure out what they were for."


http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2...d-to-build

[Image: cnrs_20160048_0006_wide-4efe9ccd84cff168...00-c85.jpg]

It’s not like what was found was intricate or beautiful, just a pile of broken off stalagmites placed in a circle but what I find fascinating is trying to imagine what a species of humans lived like 176,000 years ago...you know...170,000 years before God created the universe and such...and 172,500 years before the global flood Wink

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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03-06-2016, 07:16 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Miscellaneous info, part science and part history. (I love this stuff)

“19th-Century White House Garden Aligns with Solstice Sun"

[Image: lafayette-square-solstices.jpg?146487384...size=640:*]

http://www.livescience.com/54951-white-h...2016-06-02

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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23-06-2016, 07:46 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
More like the chic nature of science Rolleyes

I smelled comet 67P’s deadly pong and lived to tell the tale
Colin Snodgrass is unwrapping a series of nested plastic bags with the care you would normally reserve for bomb disposal. With the first layer off, I already understand why, as a sharp, unpleasant scent invades my nostrils.

I’m getting my first whiff of eau de comète, a perfume crafted to mimic the aroma of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko as sniffed by the European Space Agency’s Philae lander, whichtouched down on the comet’s surface in 2014. It really is like nothing I’ve ever smelled.

The dense pong was created by scent firm The Aroma Company at the request of Snodgrass, a researcher at the Open University in Milton Keynes, UK, and other members of the Rosetta mission team. They will be handing out samples at the Royal Society summer exhibition in London next month. “We have a bunch of postcards impregnated with this,” he says.

As Snodgrass removes the second bag, I almost feel the smell as a physical presence inside my skull, and yet there are two more bags to go. I ask if he has become desensitised. “A little, yes,” he says with a grin
.
When Philae landed on 67P, its sensors picked up the presence of hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide in the comet’s coma – gases which smell of rotten eggs, cat urine and bitter almonds.

“It’s not that bad”
The smell before me isn’t directly derived from these noxious compounds – good thing, given that some are poisonous – but the company created a scent that should reflect the whiff of 67P. “Most of the coma is water vapour, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, and they don’t smell of anything,” says Snodgrass. “We’ve picked the things that are the smelliest.”

As he opens up the final bag, the full heft of 67P’s bouquet hits me in the face. Surprisingly, it’s not actually as foul as my first impression led me to believe – somehow a few floral notes are now coming through. “I find it similar to lily,” says Geraint Jones of University College London, who took delivery of the samples at home, much to the chagrin of his wife. “It’s not that bad,” says Snodgrass.
Thankfully, the sample the pair have today is far more concentrated than those they will be inflicting on the public. If you can’t get to the Royal Society to smell it yourself, the team has bought enough postcards for future outreach events, so you may get another chance.

But can we really transmit a smell from a comet half way across the Milky Way? “If you could smell a comet, this is what you would get, but it would be difficult to actually smell it,” says Snodgrass. “If you are standing there without your space suit, you’re not going to notice the smell, you’re just going to notice the lack of air.”


And because I do believe Tim Gauld is a most charmingly genius:
[Image: CfrX0SzXEAIaBHa.jpg]

[Image: tumblr_o8k2oyhAAh1rqpa8po1_1280.png]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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