The elegant nature of science
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27-03-2013, 10:43 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Lots of fun quizzes.
http://www.space.com/20378-stars-quiz-sp...pid=520527

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27-03-2013, 10:45 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(10-03-2013 12:03 AM)I and I Wrote:  More like the elegant nature of ideology. Science has proven that there is nothing elegant in nature, it is full of violence, destruction and chaos.....unless that is what you mean by elegant.


You completely miss the point.

It is not whether the universe is elegant, it is that the inquiry is elegant.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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28-03-2013, 05:21 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Think your sex life is complicated? Imagine having 7 sexes.

"Tetrahymena thermophila — a single-celled organism that goes way beyond male and female. It has seven different sexes to choose from."

If only we had such a wide choice...

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29-03-2013, 09:52 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
"Invisble" bike helmet designed by two women

http://bigthink.com/design-for-good/yes-...is-awesome

"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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31-03-2013, 06:40 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science



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03-04-2013, 10:11 AM (This post was last modified: 03-04-2013 10:29 AM by Vera.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
Ants follow Fermat's principle of least time.

"Ants have long been known to choose the shortest of several routes to a food source, but what happens when the shortest route is not the fastest? In a new study, scientists have found that ants behave the same way as light does when traveling through different media: both paths obey Fermat's principle of least time, taking the fastest route rather than the most direct one."

And: Crucial step in human DNA replication observed for the first time.

Also, there is a certain romantic sadness about this: "during the moments when both the clamp loader and the clamp were bound to the DNA, they were not intimately engaged with each other." Sad

EDIT: Oh! Oh! And this, too: Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer zeroes in on dark matter. ... It has seen evidence of what may prove to be dark matter colliding with itself in what is known as "annihilation".

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04-04-2013, 04:22 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Because I think I desperately need to wash off the bad taste... or smell.

Body's anti-HIV 'training manual' offers vaccine hopes.

"When someone is infected with HIV, their body produces antibodies to attack it. But the virus mutates and evades the offensive, so the body produces new antibodies that the virus then evades and the war goes on.
However, after about four years of this struggle some patients hit on to a winner by targeting something the virus finds harder to change - an Achilles heel.
"Even though the virus mutates and there are literally millions of quasi-species of virus because of all these mutations, but there are parts the virus can't change otherwise the virus cannot infect - these are the vulnerable sites"..."


The thought of how many people are working everyday on things like this, repeating what to us may look tiresome and dull, over and over again; solving just a tiny little bit of the puzzle(s), is one of the most uplifting things I can think of. Makes me proud to be human (which, sadly, doesn't last long).

And just for giggles:

Female octopuses stretch further.
"While the octopuses preferred to use their longest arm to reach for the food, the sex divide in stretching ability was greatest when males used an adapted arm called the "hectoctylus".
Males use this specialised limb during mating to insert sperm into the female.
She added that previous studies have observed male octopuses holding their hectocotyli close to the body when foraging in the wild."


Men, so attached to their "hectocotyli", as usual. Laughat

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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05-04-2013, 10:41 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Much of this is beyond my scope of understanding but the gist is:

The widely accepted view among scientists is that RNA, found in all living cells, would have likely represented the first molecules of life, hypothesizing an "RNA-first" view of the origin of living systems from non-living molecules. Blaber's results indicate that the set of amino acids produced by simple chemical processes contains the requisite information to produce complex folded proteins, which supports an opposing "protein-first" view.

"Rather than a curious niche that life evolved into, the halophile environment now may take center stage as the likely location for key aspects of abiogenesis," he said. "Likewise, the role of the formation of proteins takes on additional importance in the earliest steps in the beginnings of life on Earth."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-04-clues-life.html#jCp

*Halophiles are organisms that require salt in their environment to live. Halophiles live in evaporation ponds or salt lakes such as Great Salt Lake, Owens Lake, or Dead Sea.[1] The name "halophile" comes from Greek for "salt-loving"

Life began in the seas, like this male octopus hiding his echtocotyli Vera Big Grin
[attachment=1262]

"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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06-04-2013, 08:34 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(05-04-2013 10:41 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Life began in the seas, like this male octopus hiding his hectocotyli Vera Big Grin

Much better than waving it in everyone's face... like so many (and not just octopuses) do, either literally or figuratively Drinking Beverage

And while on the subject of octopuses, you might very well be familiar with this one. Isn't he cute? In a weird, out-of-this-world, stuff-of-mild-nightmares kinda way:
[Image: dumbo_octopus-3.jpg]

[Image: day4_4_lg.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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06-04-2013, 06:02 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(06-04-2013 08:34 AM)Vera Wrote:  
(05-04-2013 10:41 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Life began in the seas, like this male octopus hiding his hectocotyli Vera Big Grin

Much better than waving it in everyone's face... like so many (and not just octopuses) do, either literally or figuratively Drinking Beverage

And while on the subject of octopuses, you might very well be familiar with this one. Isn't he cute? In a weird, out-of-this-world, stuff-of-mild-nightmares kinda way:
[Image: dumbo_octopus-3.jpg]

[Image: day4_4_lg.jpg]

These look like Dumbo Octopii Grimpoteuthis, but the second one like a squishy nightmare. Sadcryface

"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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