The elegant nature of science
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09-03-2014, 12:25 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Here is one about our place in the universe.




Jesus sprach: "Es werde Licht!" / Doch ... er fand den Schalter nicht.
Jesus said: "Let there be light!" / But ... he couldn't find the switch.
Oops
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11-03-2014, 09:33 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
"Over time, the substance of a mountain is broken down..." - who knew mountains were so much like us Undecided





"And it is here that mountains are laid to rest... Over the course of millions of years, water carries the mountains down to the sea, a teaspoon at a time." Sad

This is not very in-depth, esp. if you've dabbled in geology. But I haven't, so found it interesting and rather beautiful (sometimes had to go back, because the landscapes were so beautiful, mind started wandering off and missed what the guy was saying Rolleyes )

(Bucky, read that some place else. Really amazing!)

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderĂ²."
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17-03-2014, 08:15 AM (This post was last modified: 17-03-2014 09:36 AM by kim.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
(11-03-2014 09:33 AM)Vera Wrote:  "Over time, the substance of a mountain is broken down..." - who knew mountains were so much like us Undecided

Entropy. Drinking Beverage



I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
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17-03-2014, 11:44 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Researchers from the BICEP2 collaboration today announced the first direct evidence for this cosmic inflation. Their data also represent the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the "first tremors of the Big Bang." Finally, the data confirm a deep connection between quantum mechanics and general relativity.

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18-03-2014, 08:08 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(17-03-2014 11:44 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  Researchers from the BICEP2 collaboration today announced the first direct evidence for this cosmic inflation. Their data also represent the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the "first tremors of the Big Bang." Finally, the data confirm a deep connection between quantum mechanics and general relativity.

Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo, delivers news of the discovery to Professor Andrei Linde.

Smile




"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderĂ²."
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18-03-2014, 08:56 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(18-03-2014 08:08 AM)Vera Wrote:  
(17-03-2014 11:44 AM)houseofcantor Wrote:  Researchers from the BICEP2 collaboration today announced the first direct evidence for this cosmic inflation. Their data also represent the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the "first tremors of the Big Bang." Finally, the data confirm a deep connection between quantum mechanics and general relativity.

Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo, delivers news of the discovery to Professor Andrei Linde.

Smile






Pulitzer Prize for physics you think?

Throughout history conversions happen at the point of a sword, deconversions at the point of a pen - FC

I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's. - Mark Twain in Eruption
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18-03-2014, 01:11 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(18-03-2014 08:56 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Pulitzer Prize for physics you think?

Nah, I'd say a Grammy more likely. An Oscar at best. Angel

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21-03-2014, 09:32 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
This week, the international media has trumpeted the discovery by Australian scientists of the oldest star in the universe, with the catchy name SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, formed in the almost pristine gas soon after the Big Bang.
This would mean the star has been slowly burning away for almost 13.7 billion years.
Something older?
But this story may leave those that follow the scientific media scratching their heads slightly, as only six months ago the media telling us about HD 140283, the "Methuselah Star", whose best-estimated age is almost 14.5 billion years.


Science journalism, not so elegant. Angel

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22-03-2014, 09:07 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(18-03-2014 01:11 PM)Vera Wrote:  
(18-03-2014 08:56 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  Pulitzer Prize for physics you think?

Nah, I'd say a Grammy more likely. An Oscar at best. Angel

Not worth more than a People's Choice Award.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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22-03-2014, 09:11 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(21-03-2014 09:32 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  This week, the international media has trumpeted the discovery by Australian scientists of the oldest star in the universe, with the catchy name SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, formed in the almost pristine gas soon after the Big Bang.
This would mean the star has been slowly burning away for almost 13.7 billion years.
Something older?

Um, no it wouldn't. We don't know that it even exists any more. We can only tell that it was shining 13.7 billion years ago.

Incompetent science reporter?

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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