The elegant nature of science
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23-03-2014, 07:39 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(22-03-2014 09:07 AM)Chas Wrote:  Not worth more than a People's Choice Award.

So long as it's not Time magazine Person of the Year award. No one, least of all a brilliant scientist, deserves to be in the company of dictators, three popes, two Bushes and that vilest of things, Reagan.

Spacecraft Returns Seven Particles From Birth of the Solar System.

"After a massive, years-long search, researchers have recovered seven interstellar dust particles returned to Earth by the Stardust spacecraft. The whole sample, reported here this week at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, weighs just a few trillionths of a gram, but it’s the first time scientists have laid their hands on primordial material unaltered by the violent birth of the solar system.

The Stardust spacecraft, launched in 1999, has already accomplished its prime objective: collecting dust particles in the tail of comet Wild 2 and returning them in a reentry capsule ejected as Stardust passed by Earth in 2006. NASA went to all that trouble because comets were supposed to be the repository of the primordial ice and rock—the product of eons of star birth and death—that went into building the solar system. But it turned out that the minerals in the comet dust that Stardust managed to collect weren’t that pristine: They had been heated, melted, and totally transformed somewhere near the nascent sun and then carried outward to be incorporated into comets in the ultradeep freeze far beyond the outermost planets.
[...]
Once the sample panel was back on Earth, the problem quickly became finding any collected particles embedded in the aerogel. Out of desperation, Stardust team members called on 30,714 members of the general public. “We really did not know how else to find” the embedded particles, says Stardust team member Andrew Westphal of the University of California, Berkeley. The “dusters” of the Stardust@home project—who as a group were listed as authors of the talk—volunteered to examine microscopic images taken down through the aerogel. They used the world’s best pattern-recognition system—the human eye and brain—to pick out the telltale tracks left by speeding particles.

One hundred million searches later, Stardust team members had seven “probable” dust impacts on the collector. Two particles weighing in at about 3 trillionths of a gram each—100 billion of them would equal a grain of sugar—drove into the aerogel at less than 18,000 kilometers per hour and lodged there. A third came in so fast that it didn’t even leave a chemical residue, only a track. Four more particles serendipitously blasted into thin aluminum foil around the edges of the aerogel, leaving measurable material in their craters.

“It’s an enormous achievement that the Stardust team got this far,” says cosmochemist Scott Messenger of NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, who is not on the team. He agrees with Westphal that these “are the most challenging extraterrestrial samples ever."

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24-03-2014, 09:55 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Evolution goes retro...

Bioretrosynthesis offers a method to develop environmentally friendly manufacturing processes because it relies on enzymes – the biological catalysts that make life possible – instead of the high temperatures and pressures, toxic metals, strong acids and bases frequently required by synthetic chemistry.

[Image: 10339580_583235681775606_5139032440228868471_n.jpg]
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09-04-2014, 01:33 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
One kind of supersymmetry shown to emerge naturally.

"While the Standard Model governing the ordinary world is not supersymmetric, it is often theorized that the more "fundamental" theory relevant to very hot systems, such as those probed in high-energy particle accelerators like the LHC (or higher energy ones yet to be built), might exhibit supersymmetry. This has yet to be proved or disproved by accelerator experiments.

However, through their calculations, Grover and his co-authors show that supersymmetry emerges naturally in a topological superconductor. An example is helium-3, a light, nonradioactive isotope of helium with two protons and one neutron (common helium has two neutrons). When helium-3 is cooled to almost absolute zero (0 Kelvin), it becomes a liquid superconductor. As understood only recently, the boundary of its container features fermions.

"The reason these fermions exist is related to time-reversal symmetry, which is unrelated to supersymmetry," said Grover. A video of an object tossed vertically up in the air is a good example of time-reversal symmetry. When the video is played back, it shows the object following the same parabolic trajectory through the air as it did when the video was played normally. "We wanted to see what would happen to these fermions when time-reversal symmetry was broken," Grover explained.

The scientists theorized that the application of a specified amount of magnetic field to the surface of the container would break the time-reversal symmetry. This, in turn, would cause the fermions to disappear due to their interaction with bosons that already exist in the liquid helium-3. Grover and his coauthors found that right at the point when fermions are about to disappear, the fermions and the bosons behave as superpartners of each other, thus providing a condensed matter analog of supersymmetry."

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07-05-2014, 11:16 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Scientists create first living organism that transmits added letters in DNA 'alphabet'.

"Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have engineered a bacterium whose genetic material includes an added pair of DNA "letters," or bases, not found in nature. The cells of this unique bacterium can replicate the unnatural DNA bases more or less normally, for as long as the molecular building blocks are supplied.

"Life on Earth in all its diversity is encoded by only two pairs of DNA bases, A-T and C-G, and what we've made is an organism that stably contains those two plus a third, unnatural pair of bases," said TSRI Associate Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, who led the research team. "This shows that other solutions to storing information are possible and, of course, takes us closer to an expanded-DNA biology that will have many exciting applications—from new medicines to new kinds of nanotechnology."

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07-05-2014, 03:25 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Peacock spider from Australia...coolest arachnid EVER!




Throughout history conversions happen at the point of a sword, deconversions at the point of a pen - FC

I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's. - Mark Twain in Eruption
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07-05-2014, 03:29 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(07-05-2014 11:16 AM)Vera Wrote:  Scientists create first living organism that transmits added letters in DNA 'alphabet'.

"Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have engineered a bacterium whose genetic material includes an added pair of DNA "letters," or bases, not found in nature. The cells of this unique bacterium can replicate the unnatural DNA bases more or less normally, for as long as the molecular building blocks are supplied.

"Life on Earth in all its diversity is encoded by only two pairs of DNA bases, A-T and C-G, and what we've made is an organism that stably contains those two plus a third, unnatural pair of bases," said TSRI Associate Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, who led the research team. "This shows that other solutions to storing information are possible and, of course, takes us closer to an expanded-DNA biology that will have many exciting applications—from new medicines to new kinds of nanotechnology."

So what happens next? Could they create an E. coli bacteria that we can't control?

Throughout history conversions happen at the point of a sword, deconversions at the point of a pen - FC

I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's. - Mark Twain in Eruption
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18-05-2014, 11:31 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Proposed experiment would create matter from light.

"Imperial College London physicists have discovered how to create matter from light - a feat thought impossible when the idea was first theorised 80 years ago.

In just one day over several cups of coffee in a tiny office in Imperial's Blackett Physics Laboratory, three physicists worked out a relatively simple way to physically prove a theory first devised by scientists Breit and Wheeler in 1934.

Breit and Wheeler suggested that it should be possible to turn light into matter by smashing together only two particles of light (photons), to create an electron and a positron – the simplest method of turning light into matter ever predicted. The calculation was found to be theoretically sound but Breit and Wheeler said that they never expected anybody to physically demonstrate their prediction. It has never been observed in the laboratory and past experiments to test it have required the addition of massive high-energy particles.

The new research, published in Nature Photonics, shows for the first time how Breit and Wheeler's theory could be proven in practice. This 'photon-photon collider', which would convert light directly into matter using technology that is already available, would be a new type of high-energy physics experiment. This experiment would recreate a process that was important in the first 100 seconds of the universe and that is also seen in gamma ray bursts, which are the biggest explosions in the universe and one of physics' greatest unsolved mysteries."

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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19-05-2014, 07:47 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(07-05-2014 03:29 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  So what happens next? Could they create an E. coli bacteria that we can't control?

At this point the bacteria can only retain its new letters when bathed in a special chemical cocktail:
"An important thing to note is that these two breakthroughs also provide control over the system. Our new bases can only get into the cell if we turn on the 'base transporter' protein. Without this transporter or when new bases are not provided, the cell will revert back to A, T, G, C, and the d5SICS and dNaM will disappear from the genome."

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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30-05-2014, 01:32 PM (This post was last modified: 30-05-2014 04:05 PM by therealJim.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
Here is a really cool thing:
Scientists have taken the data set that contains the evidence for the Higgs Boson,
and turned it into a corresponding piece of music.

Here.
The article also explains where in the data set you can "hear" the Higgs. Very cool.
Worship Slaves

Jesus sprach: "Es werde Licht!" / Doch ... er fand den Schalter nicht.
Jesus said: "Let there be light!" / But ... he couldn't find the switch.
Oops
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31-05-2014, 10:36 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(18-11-2011 03:20 PM)kim Wrote:  Once again, my hookup is crap. Wanted to upload some things from my drive, but I'll settle for placing links.

One of my all time favorite's from Phil is called Why Scientists Don't Fear Hell -brilliant!
And then he did this...



I know ... we've all seen it, so I'm putting it up for some who perhaps have not.
Blush And, I never get tired of watching it.

Heart Thanks Phil.

Well, I had not seen this, and thank you Kim for thinking of people like me. It gave me goosebumps, and I enjoyed every minute of it.

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled. ~Mark Twain
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