The elegant nature of science
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
22-12-2011, 01:08 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
I often find myself thinking about the beauty of science. There's a short somewhat humourous TED Talk where a radio show host discusses the beauty and wonder of science (in a sort of popular science way). But just simple ideas such as being made of stars, realizing that when you look at the night sky some (possibly many) of those bright dots have their own solar systems, that enzymes inside you can be involved in up to 10000 reactions per second. Science is beautiful in itself, and makes everything else that much more amazing. I leave you with what is one of my favourite diagrams (being a biology nerd), the major metabolic reactions that happen in your body. All this is happening inside you, I find this both amazing and beautiful.

[Image: 315747_10150429278970605_639130604_10696...2249_n.jpg]

"Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way."
- Christopher Hitchens
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes kylestyle's post
25-12-2011, 11:43 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science




Simulation of a visit to a planet to discover life using current scientific paradigm.

[Image: klingon_zps7e68578a.jpg]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes houseofcantor's post
26-12-2011, 12:54 AM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(25-12-2011 11:43 PM)houseofcantor Wrote:  



Simulation of a visit to a planet to discover life using current scientific paradigm.

I remember watching, and falling in love with this "documentary" a couple years ago. News of Kepler 22b reignited this idea in my mind. Just the idea that there are potentially so many paths that evolution did not go down, that could have occurred, and that may have happened somewhere else. Imagine all the body forms that evolved somewhere deep in space? I get excited just thinking about it.

"Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way."
- Christopher Hitchens
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes kylestyle's post
13-01-2012, 02:12 PM (This post was last modified: 10-10-2013 09:20 AM by kim.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
Well, it being Friday the 13th and all, I thought I'd throw something cheery at everyone.
The sun will explode and all humanity will cease to exist. Shocking




It's ok; you'll already be dead. Smile

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
13-01-2012, 04:02 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(13-01-2012 02:12 PM)kim Wrote:  Well, it being Friday the 13th and all, I thought I'd throw something cheery at everyone.
The sun will explode and all humanity will cease to exist.
It's ok; you'll already be dead. Smile

Thanks, I needed that.Dodgy

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
13-01-2012, 05:10 PM (This post was last modified: 15-01-2012 06:12 AM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
Lawrence Krauss was on NPR's Science Friday this afternoon.
He wrote "A Universe From Nothing". You can find the show as an NPR audio from today. He also has a good video, at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ImvlS8PLIo

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Bucky Ball's post
18-01-2012, 05:22 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
Now, it being January the 18th -and my brother's birthday- I'm laying on you a beautiful photo taken about this time last year. Too amazing for any of my tiny words. Cool
[Image: 516472main_arp147_full.jpg]

This is The black hole ring photographed in Jan. 2011.
This composite image of Arp 147, a pair of interacting galaxies located about 430 million light years from Earth, shows X-rays from the NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (pink) and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (red, green, blue) produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md.

Arp 147 contains the remnant of a spiral galaxy (right) that collided with the elliptical galaxy on the left. This collision has produced an expanding wave of star formation that shows up as a blue ring containing in abundance of massive young stars. These stars race through their evolution in a few million years or less and explode as supernovas, leaving behind neutron stars and black holes.

A fraction of the neutron stars and black holes will have companion stars, and may become bright X-ray sources as they pull in matter from their companions. The nine X-ray sources scattered around the ring in Arp 147 are so bright that they must be black holes, with masses that are likely ten to twenty times that of the Sun.

An X-ray source is also detected in the nucleus of the red galaxy on the left and may be powered by a poorly-fed supermassive black hole. This source is not obvious in the composite image but can easily be seen in the X-ray image. Other objects unrelated to Arp 147 are also visible: a foreground star in the lower left of the image and a background quasar as the pink source above and to the left of the red galaxy.

Infrared observations with NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and ultraviolet observations with NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) have allowed estimates of the rate of star formation in the ring. These estimates, combined with the use of models for the evolution of binary stars have allowed the authors to conclude that the most intense star formation may have ended some 15 million years ago, in Earth's time frame.

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes kim's post
19-01-2012, 06:37 AM (This post was last modified: 19-01-2012 05:30 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: The elegant nature of science
Wow fantastic picture there Kimmy. But my question is, did you have a LESBIAN (birthday) party for him ? Tongue

BTW, was thinking the last couple days about the "quantum fluctuation" thingy in the "Universe from Nothing", (Krauss' book/video),.. If that happened, and I see no reason why it wouldn't, then doesn't that imply that a "system" or set of physical laws were already in place according to which that happened ? It really doesn't answer the "ultimate" question....not that I need one of those RIGHT NOW. Anyone read anything or thought about that ?

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein Certified Ancient Astronaut Theorist and Levitating yogi, CAAT-LY.
Yeah, for verily I say unto thee, and this we know : Jebus no likey that which doth tickle thee unto thy nether regions.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Bucky Ball's post
19-01-2012, 05:09 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
New pic of the Helix Nebula

http://lightyears.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/...?hpt=us_t3

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect.”

-Mark Twain
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
19-01-2012, 05:32 PM
RE: The elegant nature of science
(19-01-2012 06:37 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  BTW, was thinking the last couple days about the "quantum fluctuation" thingy in the "Universe from Nothing", (Krauss' book/video),.. If that happened, and I see no reason why it wouldn't, then doesn't that imply that a "system" or set of physical laws were already in place according to which that happened ? It really doesn't answer the "ultimate" question....not that I need one of those RIGHT NOW. Anyone read anything or thought about that ?

Hmm.. I'll have to think on that.. I don't think it necessary to rely on a quantum vacuum fluctuation origin of sorts - they occur in empty spacetime. Other proposals do not involve a preexisting spacetime at all, and rely upon quantum tunneling rather than vacuum fluctuation. Vilenkin's tunneling condition might be something to look at... it would involve wave function... I like waves... if you are looking for "answers". I'll still have to think about it to put it together, though. Shy

I think in the end, I just feel like I'm a secular person who has a skeptical eye toward any extraordinary claim, carefully examining any extraordinary evidence before jumping to conclusions. ~ Eric ~ My friend ... who figured it out.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: