The importance of being remembered
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05-05-2014, 08:11 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
(05-05-2014 07:09 AM)War Horse Wrote:  The thing that grinds on me is, that all the things that I've held dear and have meant something to me in my life, will be scattered to the four winds or thrown in the trash by someone unknown. I have no direct offspring and no family any younger than I.

I sometimes wish that I could leave all my stuff to somebody that would care about it, but allas, theres no one.

I thought about that too - until I saw friends passing away and their offspring threw everything they valued in the trash.... it's "outdated"...





[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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05-05-2014, 08:16 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
Hello Dom, how’s it going?

(04-05-2014 08:13 AM)Dom Wrote:  A lot of times that is why people procreate - they want someone to carry on when they are gone, someone to remember them, someone to carry on the name…
I suppose so, although sometimes they simply fancy a shag and the physiological consequences come rather unexpectedly. Nevertheless, many living beings reproduce themselves and it is not always clear that they do so in order for their names to carry on. Many trees fill the spring atmosphere with their love dust but I doubt they understand what a name is.

I guess most of us come from a long series of ancestors who had not only the ability to reproduce, but also the inclination to do so. Our genes build machines that reward themselves when they achieve copulation, most likely because that behaviour is beneficial for the set of genes that build those machines. Sets of genes that produce individuals with little inclination towards reproduction aren’t usually stable over long periods of time; they tend to die out with the individuals they build.

But I think I may agree with you; we can leave our imprints in many ways other than fucking everyone else, and it doesn’t matter what happens to our names after our bodies become disintegrated into simpler structures.

Thank you for your interesting view.
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05-05-2014, 08:21 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
Hello Airportkid, thank you for the timeline you’ve linked to.

An enhancement that your friend might want to make, if you don’t mind me suggesting one, is adding spatial coordinates to the events described along the timeline, so that they can be represented on a map while history is fast forwarded, if you know what I mean. That might provide an interesting view about how our cultures have propagated in space over time.

Regarding the rest of your welcome contribution, while I do see how wheels and the notion of rolling have been very beneficial for all humanity, I cannot truly know if that is the greatest legacy in human technological history and I am not prone to organising things by greatness because what I find great depends entirely on my subjective point of view; I don’t expect other people to agree with my recognition. If it weren’t for the wheel, for writing systems, for navigation devices, for medical instruments, for rockets, for computers, for computer networks, for all sorts of inventions, I’d still be trying to hunt animals by throwing stones at them. Or, more likely, long dead.

I agree with both of you in that remembrance is not driven by just deservedness of remembrance. In fact, I can think of quite a few instances of remembrance in which the deservedness seems completely unjust. People remember the names of the greatest murderers, but people don’t generally even know or care who invented the computer network that some of us use almost continuously, even though those inventors are still alive today. I may have a chance to thank one of them personally later on this year, and I really hope I will. In my view, this person has made as big an impact on my life as the unknown inventor of the wheel did, but I will never have the chance to thank the latter for his or her inventiveness.

Whether other people find it more satisfying to live the moment or leave a legacy, that probably depends on who you ask, but if you ask me, I’d say they are not mutually exclusive. I’d like to make a difference in the lives of people I encounter by helping them if I can whenever they may need it, because I’d like to live in a society where its members help each other overcome their personal problems. Whatever help I may provide is the legacy I want to leave behind, but I enjoy every moment I manage to help; it makes me feel useful. Unfortunately, however, I cannot always manage to help.

Funnily enough, many if not most of the personal problems I encounter are generally due to the parasitism exerted by some human beings upon their contemporaries and their potential descendants. Some people want to buy the largest grave in the graveyard and that causes lots of problems.

Thanks, Airportkid. I hope you manage to leave your legacy, but I also hope that you enjoy every moment in the meantime.
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05-05-2014, 08:22 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
(04-05-2014 11:08 AM)Thanh Wrote:  I think I will be remembered as a geeky shut-in who loved to absorb a lot of information without sharing much with the outside world and not really doing anything else for society.

I paid taxes, so there's that. I made a few donations to various charities...
Hello Thanh, I thank you not only for your contribution to this thread, but also for the contributions to society that you mention.

It may be that you will be remembered as you describe, it may be that no one after three generations remembers your name, or it may be that you will end up remembered for something great that you have not even thought of yet, who knows?

But do you think it will make any difference in your life, after it has finished, whether people actually remember your name or not?
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05-05-2014, 08:22 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
(05-05-2014 08:16 AM)living thing Wrote:  Hello Dom, how’s it going?

(04-05-2014 08:13 AM)Dom Wrote:  A lot of times that is why people procreate - they want someone to carry on when they are gone, someone to remember them, someone to carry on the name…
I suppose so, although sometimes they simply fancy a shag and the physiological consequences come rather unexpectedly. Nevertheless, many living beings reproduce themselves and it is not always clear that they do so in order for their names to carry on. Many trees fill the spring atmosphere with their love dust but I doubt they understand what a name is.

I guess most of us come from a long series of ancestors who had not only the ability to reproduce, but also the inclination to do so. Our genes build machines that reward themselves when they achieve copulation, most likely because that behaviour is beneficial for the set of genes that build those machines. Sets of genes that produce individuals with little inclination towards reproduction aren’t usually stable over long periods of time; they tend to die out with the individuals they build.

But I think I may agree with you; we can leave our imprints in many ways other than fucking everyone else, and it doesn’t matter what happens to our names after our bodies become disintegrated into simpler structures.

Thank you for your interesting view.

Well, when I tell people that I am childless by choice, they most often ask whether I don't want someone to carry on the name and genes... so that comes to mind here. And yes, many people have kids just because they happen to be a result of their instinctual actions... my grandparents had 11 daughters because gramps wanted a boy to carry on the name, til gramma went on strike...

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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05-05-2014, 08:28 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
(05-05-2014 08:22 AM)Dom Wrote:  ... my grandparents had 11 daughters because gramps wanted a boy to carry on the name, til gramma went on strike...
Smile Yeah, that happens too.

My grandparents on my father's side had 11 children of both sexes, although the eldest died when she was just two months old. I think gramps didn't really care whether they were boys or girls, he probably just liked calling the stork.
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05-05-2014, 08:32 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
Hello TrainWreck, thanks for joining in.

I appreciate your offer for me to become the first in something, but I am not sure I will be able to help you; I’m still struggling to describe my own view, which is the one I understand, never mind trying to describe someone else’s view.

Nevertheless, I’m not sure I understand your view. From my perspective, the events by which we have gained knowledge about the universe around us are better described as discoveries rather than revelations. Discoveries imply a discoverer, and I have no problem with that; living beings are learning agents. Revelations, however, seem to imply a revealer, and I find no room for a revealer in my mental model of the universe. Regarding prizes given to authorities, I don’t believe in authorities and I am not impressed by political prizes.

Good luck with your delivery; I hope it really is beneficial for humanity forever, although I have my doubts because forever is infinitely longer than a infinitely long time. But how would I know?

Have fun!
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05-05-2014, 08:33 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
(04-05-2014 11:45 AM)kim Wrote:  Heart Unforgettable.
Hello kim, thanks for the picture!
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05-05-2014, 08:35 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
Hello Juv, how are you?

(05-05-2014 04:23 AM)Juv Wrote:  It is beneficial for people to remember loved ones, and to enjoy remembering them, IMO.
Remembering missing loved ones can be beneficial for people who remain alive, that is why I often welcome post-mortem remembrances. But one thing is people remembering dead ones, and something different is being remembered by people who remain alive.

I don’t think being remembered after our deaths is important, although I do see how becoming useful to others even after our deaths would be… well, useful for those who remain alive.
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05-05-2014, 08:37 AM
RE: The importance of being remembered
Hello Mathilda, I’m glad your twenties were just one more decade.

(05-05-2014 04:46 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  I'm not going to reproduce but I still have an instinct to leave something behind that outlasts me.
I think I may understand what you are saying. I doubt that I will reproduce, so I don’t think I’ll leave any real information behind; my specific set of genes appears to be a failed evolutionary experiment but I don’t mind, I enjoy my lucky chance to live nevertheless. And being unable to leave orphans behind removes a lot of psychological pressure!

But I can leave virtual information behind by letting abstract ideas out of my brain, and I am lucky enough to have lived a revolution in the propagation of abstract information. Today, it is easier than ever sharing one’s view with our fellow human beings. That is one of the reasons why I come to this forum to think out loud, so to speak.

Our inventions are simply ways to use what we learn about the universe for our benefit, and as such, they rely on the body of accumulated knowledge that has been gathered over centuries if not millenia. If your goal is channelling your curiosity towards learning something that can be useful for others, then I am happy that you’ve existed; your life is meaningful as a provider of knowledge. I thank you already for all your efforts.

Out of curiosity, what kind of problems do you tackle?
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