The origin of the word "God"
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19-02-2017, 11:44 AM
The origin of the word "God"
In keeping with my theme around here I thought I would post about something which has bothered me for some time and which I had a thought the other day that I had resolved but may be completely wrong about. As we know, I am of the view that the people who we call the Jews of the Old Testament are from the region of what is now Syria and southern Turkey and were the descendents of the Sumerians who had spread north.

These people had a god named Khaldi. I have been studying Turkish which has the same agglutinative structure as Sumerian and in Turkish the 'i' suffix denoted possession or more precisely the condition of being possessed. We don't have this suffix in English. In Turkish the 's ending is 'in. "Bob's hand" would, if we had such a suffix, be "Bob'in handi". Actually it would be "handa" since the ending has to harmonize with the preceding vowel. Turkish also has an additional vowel, an "I" with no dot.

Where this took me is that "Khaldi" is not the gods name. His name is "Khald". He is depicted as a combination of a man and lion with wings. I suspect this is where the Sphynx originates.

I was watching a Richard Dawkins YouTube debate and he asked how God was any different for some African deity with a silly name and it occured to me that when we say "God" we ignore the fact that the word itself is just as silly as any other god name and that it too comes to us linguistically from an older name in another, older language and probably was some character such as Khald.

I haven't found any support for this theory, nor have I ever heard of any other explanation of the word's origin.
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19-02-2017, 01:00 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
The most common short explanation is that the English word "god" originates in the German "gott" and is related to the Dutch "god". Beyond that, digging deeper into prot-Germanic sources ...

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=god

... it is speculated that it evolved from "that which is invoked".

My favorite takedown of the name of god is in Terry Prachett, don't remember which of his books, in which he describes a nation-state whose god is named "Nuggin". It's a very authoritarian society that's clearly designed to poke fun at religious fundamentalists; the priesthood is always adding things to the Book of Nuggin that qualify as "an abomination unto Nuggin". I find that hilarious because "Nuggin" sounds like a child's cuddle toy and it sort of highlights the ridiculousness of all this asserted authority and umbrage.
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19-02-2017, 08:01 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
Yes, any word can sound silly if you say it over and over but Nuggin gets straight to the point

We Ted to be in awe of the word "God" and have to differentiate between the small and capital letter spelling as if we are differentiating between the concept of a god and something more "precious". In a Golum snoring course.

I have to ait I have always had a problem with etymological explanations of words. We tend to want to compare Englissh words to some other language as though English is a completely made up language of people who had to get their words from some other language.

Up don't know.how that works, for instance, to say something came.from the Greek or German or French as though we rubbed up against these other languages on a daily basis.

The eye opener for me was learning Turkish and being exposed to it. I have realized that English words are to a very large extent the same as Turkish words and you can understand English words by breaking them down into the sounds that make them up.. for instance, "near" is "ne" "ar" which means "where" "place". "Ar" gives us "area". And so on.

English appears to be derived from Turkish by way of a process called "anagramatization" whereby the backward structure of Turkish is pulled apart
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19-02-2017, 08:41 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
I was editing the above post because of all the Kindle generated typos and the system has removed my edit button. Is there a reason for this happening.?
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19-02-2017, 08:46 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(19-02-2017 08:41 PM)Deltabravo Wrote:  I was editing the above post because of all the Kindle generated typos and the system has removed my edit button. Is there a reason for this happening.?

Maybe too much time passed.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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19-02-2017, 09:49 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(19-02-2017 08:01 PM)Deltabravo Wrote:  The eye opener for me was learning Turkish and being exposed to it. I have realized that English words are to a very large extent the same as Turkish words and you can understand English words by breaking them down into the sounds that make them up.. for instance, "near" is "ne" "ar" which means "where" "place". "Ar" gives us "area". And so on.

English appears to be derived from Turkish by way of a process called "anagramatization" whereby the backward structure of Turkish is pulled apart
The thing I love about Turkish is that it has no hidden pronunciation rules (that I'm aware of). If you know how the accents and ligatures attached to letters change the default sounds, you can correctly pronounce Turkish whether you understand it or not, just by reading it.
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19-02-2017, 09:59 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
A dyslexic was calling his dog.

Atheism is NOT a Religion. It's A Personal Relationship With Reality!
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19-02-2017, 10:48 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(19-02-2017 09:49 PM)mordant Wrote:  
(19-02-2017 08:01 PM)Deltabravo Wrote:  The eye opener for me was learning Turkish and being exposed to it. I have realized that English words are to a very large extent the same as Turkish words and you can understand English words by breaking them down into the sounds that make them up.. for instance, "near" is "ne" "ar" which means "where" "place". "Ar" gives us "area". And so on.

English appears to be derived from Turkish by way of a process called "anagramatization" whereby the backward structure of Turkish is pulled apart
The thing I love about Turkish is that it has no hidden pronunciation rules (that I'm aware of). If you know how the accents and ligatures attached to letters change the default sounds, you can correctly pronounce Turkish whether you understand it or not, just by reading it.

That is kind of the same with Russian - it's very phonetic.
**
But, I was thinking about Turkish - Deltabravo said that "Turkish has the same agglutinative structure as Sumerian and in Turkish the 'i' suffix denoted possession or more precisely the condition of being possessed."

Consider
I recall a friend of mine who spoke about the agglutinative structure being Swahili in nature and then, thought about how language and the interpretation of languages progressed to the nearly ubiquitous Latin.

With modern Latin syntax, we have the normative use of the reflexive - such as, I, myself wash - in english - I wash myself.
Might not this include the historical interpretation of the agglutinative suffix denoting possession or condition of being possessed?
**
I would liken it to the French spoken today in Quebec, which has an odd archaic feel when compared to the French spoken today in France. Archaic languages seem follow the movement of like languages surrounding similar time frames.

I know - just random thoughts. Shy

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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19-02-2017, 11:34 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(19-02-2017 08:46 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(19-02-2017 08:41 PM)Deltabravo Wrote:  I was editing the above post because of all the Kindle generated typos and the system has removed my edit button. Is there a reason for this happening.?

Maybe too much time passed.

I wasn't aware of that. The problem with a Kindle Fire is it has a very sensitive on screen keyboard and uses predictive text so you think type a word and then space and the space bar activates the predictive text and inserts whatever dumb word it has thrown up. It also seems to detect heat so it types a period when I move my thumb to the space bar.
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20-02-2017, 01:00 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(19-02-2017 10:48 PM)kim Wrote:  
(19-02-2017 09:49 PM)mordant Wrote:  The thing I love about Turkish is that it has no hidden pronunciation rules (that I'm aware of). If you know how the accents and ligatures attached to letters change the default sounds, you can correctly pronounce Turkish whether you understand it or not, just by reading it.

That is kind of the same with Russian - it's very phonetic.
**
But, I was thinking about Turkish - Deltabravo said that "Turkish has the same agglutinative structure as Sumerian and in Turkish the 'i' suffix denoted possession or more precisely the condition of being possessed."

Consider
I recall a friend of mine who spoke about the agglutinative structure being Swahili in nature and then, thought about how language and the interpretation of languages progressed to the nearly ubiquitous Latin.

With modern Latin syntax, we have the normative use of the reflexive - such as, I, myself wash - in english - I wash myself.
Might not this include the historical interpretation of the agglutinative suffix denoting possession or condition of being possessed?
**
I would liken it to the French spoken today in Quebec, which has an odd archaic feel when compared to the French spoken today in France. Archaic languages seem follow the movement of like languages surrounding similar time frames.

I know - just random thoughts. Shy

Yes, that is the same thing I have found. The older and more "slang" a language is, the more you will find it resembles Turkish. In Turkey when you drive through a road works, the worker with the stop and go sign yells "Git" at you. The first time this happened I was shocked and turned my head.

Latin, I understand, is based on Greek and Greek is de-agglutinized or "anagramatized" Turkish.

I notice the similarity between Turkish and Appalachian English which is more original than modern English. For instance, a "big Inn" in Turkish is a "Buyuk Hahn".

Where you can see that all European languages have a common root is in words like "folk"... German "volk" and Turkish "halk" so a public beach is a "halk plaji". You also have a "carob" tree being a "harap" tree in Turkish. It shows that our spellings of words are only approximations of the sounds which originally formed languages, and different peoples used slightly different sounds, or made them in different ways to give the same meaning. English has, for instance, has fewer fricatives and we tend not to see that some words in other languages have the same meaning and were probably pronounced in a different way many years ago.

Take the "carob" and "harap" example. It also comes through in the English word "heart" and French "coeur". What this denotes to me is that at some point they both come from a similar root with a fricative as the initial sound. The spellings actually detract from our understanding of the origin of the word and its meaning. Both come from the Sumerian word for "fire" so we have words like "hearth" and "carbon" and "kerosene". Fire was a concept which denoted origin in those days and we still see that because we use "heart" and "core" to mean the same thing.

It's all very interesting and more so if you live here and are exposed to the language. My main point, however, is that I want to demystify the word and concept of God and show him to be "Khald". The language connection takes one there, as does his representation as a flying man/lion.

Wiki says this: Ḫaldi (Haldi.jpgd, Ḫaldi, also known as Khaldi or Hayk,[2] Armenian: Խալդի) was one of the three chief deities of Urartu (Ararat). His shrine was at Ardini (Muṣaṣir).

I think this is interesting because he is a god of the people of the area of Mount Ararat, who have to have been the people spoken of in the Old Testament story since that's where Noah ends up, and Josephus tells us that the Jews of Egypt came from Assyria, which is where Urartu is. So, whether you believe in the biblical Exodus story, these are the biblical people and this Khald was their male god figure, ie., God. That's him: [Image: Erevan_-_La_forteresse_d%27Er%C3%A9bouni_04.JPG]
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