The origin of the word "God"
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20-02-2017, 01:03 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
I think that years of singing in church choir drilled a special awe in pronouncing "God" into me. We were always urged not to sing "Gad" or "Gaahd" but "G -awe-d" with everyone pronouncing the "d" all at once. (This ensured people didn't hear "d-d-d-d-d-d" across the aisle." I still get a little thrill when I say "God" with all the grandeur and conviction choral singing taught me.
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20-02-2017, 02:28 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(19-02-2017 01:00 PM)mordant Wrote:  The most common short explanation is that the English word "god" originates in the German "gott" and is related to the Dutch "god". Beyond that, digging deeper into prot-Germanic sources ...

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=god

... it is speculated that it evolved from "that which is invoked".

My favorite takedown of the name of god is in Terry Prachett, don't remember which of his books, in which he describes a nation-state whose god is named "Nuggin". It's a very authoritarian society that's clearly designed to poke fun at religious fundamentalists; the priesthood is always adding things to the Book of Nuggin that qualify as "an abomination unto Nuggin". I find that hilarious because "Nuggin" sounds like a child's cuddle toy and it sort of highlights the ridiculousness of all this asserted authority and umbrage.

"That which is invoked at every opportunity to explain everything."

I have a website here which discusses the issues and terminology surrounding religion and atheism. It's hopefully user friendly to all.
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20-02-2017, 02:39 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
This also explains an overlap between English, French and German. Take the name "Harry" for instance. Harry is supposed to come from the French "Henri" which is from the German "Heinrich". If you look further into it's meaning you get a reference to the Old Scots (Germanic) word "hame" or home. The suffix means "king" so we get "home king". So they say. But the Scots "hame" comes from "hearth" or place of fire, so it's circular. "Harry" is just another way of pronouncing "aris" which means kingly and gives us "aristocracy". It all goes back to the "Aryans" and their feudal kings which is why Harry is the most common name for English kings who descended from Pagans or Norman Pagan Christains like Rolo, William the Conqueror's dad.

The Hame word in Scots is interesting because the Italian word for Heinrique is Amerigo and we all "know" that America was supposedly named after Amerigo Vespucci. I rather doubt that this is the case. I think it is a ruse and that the sailors who discovered the place looked back to their "homeric" past and picked a name which related to that rather than some relatively obscure explorer. I think they saw themselves as descendents of the Phoenicians and wanted to very subtly make America the new home of the "Aryans".
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20-02-2017, 11:09 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
This story appears to me to be the origin of the story of David and Goliath. It's about the people who lived near Van in southern Turkey and considered themselves to be descended from Noah so they appear to be one and the same as the "Jews". The other name for the god "Khaldi" is Hayek and he is considered to have been a real person, not something floating around in a heaven:

Hayk and King Bel[edit]
In Movses Khorenatsi's account, Hayk, son of Torgom, had a child named Armanak while he was living in Babylon. After the arrogant Titanid Bel made himself king over all, Hayk emigrated to the region near Mount Ararat with an extended household of at least 300 and settled there, founding a village he named Haykashen. On the way, he had left a detachment in another settlement with his grandson Kadmos. Bel sent one of his sons to entreat him to return, but was refused. Bel decided to march against him with a massive force, but Hayk was warned ahead of time by Kadmos of his pending approach. He assembled his own army along the shore of Lake Van and told them that they must defeat and kill Bel, or die trying to do so, rather than become his slaves. In his writings Movses states that:

“ Hayk was a handsome, friendly man, with curly hair, sparkling eyes, and strong arms. He was a man of giant stature, a mighty archer and fearless warrior. Hayk and his people, from the time of their forefathers Noah and Japheth, had migrated south toward the warmer lands near Babylon. In that land there ruled a wicked giant, Bel. Bel tried to impose his tyranny upon Hayk’s people. But proud Hayk refused to submit to Bel. As soon as his son Aramaneak was born, Hayk rose up, and led his people back to the land of his forefathers, the land of Ararat. At the foot of the mountains, he built his home, Haykashen.[1] ”
The Battle of the Giants and Defeat of Bel[edit]

Hayk defeats Bel with an arrow.
Hayk and his men soon discovered Bel's army positioned in a mountain pass (Moses of Chorene located the site as Dastakert), with the king in the vanguard.

At Dyutsaznamart (Armenian: Դյուցազնամարտ, "Battle of Giants"), near Julamerk southeast of Lake Van, on August 11, 2492 BC [2] (according to the Armenian traditional chronology) or 2107 BC (according to "The Chronological table" of Mikael Chamchian), Hayk slew Bel with a nearly impossible shot using a long bow, sending the king's forces into disarray.

The hill where Bel with his warriors fell, Hayk named Gerezmank meaning "tombs".[3] He embalmed the corpse of Bel and ordered it to be taken to Hark where it was to be buried in a high place in the view of the wives and sons of the king.

Soon after, Hayk established the fortress of Haykaberd at the battle site and the town of Haykashen in the Armenian province of Taron (modern-day Turkey). He named the region of the battle Hayk, and the site of the battle Hayots Dzor [4] Wikipedia
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20-02-2017, 12:04 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(20-02-2017 02:39 AM)Deltabravo Wrote:  It all goes back to the "Aryans" and their feudal kings which is why Harry is the most common name for English kings who descended from Pagans or Norman Pagan Christains like Rolo, William the Conqueror's dad.

William the Bastard's father was Robert, Duke of Normandy. There is some confusion with the Duke sometimes being Robert I and sometimes Robert II with his ancestor Rollo (or Hrolf) being Robert I. There may be further confusion since Rollo's (or Robert's or Hrolf's) son and heir was William Longsword.

There have been eight King Henrys but also eight Edwards.

[As eny fule kno two of the Henrys, IV and VI were divided into parts, two and three respectively, so the grand total is eleven.]
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22-02-2017, 09:07 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(20-02-2017 12:04 PM)Norm Deplume Wrote:  
(20-02-2017 02:39 AM)Deltabravo Wrote:  It all goes back to the "Aryans" and their feudal kings which is why Harry is the most common name for English kings who descended from Pagans or Norman Pagan Christains like Rolo, William the Conqueror's dad.

William the Bastard's father was Robert, Duke of Normandy. There is some confusion with the Duke sometimes being Robert I and sometimes Robert II with his ancestor Rollo (or Hrolf) being Robert I. There may be further confusion since Rollo's (or Robert's or Hrolf's) son and heir was William Longsword.

There have been eight King Henrys but also eight Edwards.

[As eny fule kno two of the Henrys, IV and VI were divided into parts, two and three respectively, so the grand total is eleven.]

Yes, you are right. Rollo was the great-great-great-grandfather of William I.

But he was still a pagan/Christian, from my limited research.

Anyway, the point I am making is that Abraham was from Ur of the Chaldees, according to the OT. The Chadeans were these people in the region of Van who worshipped Khaldi. The Urartians would seem to fit the bill as the people being referred to in the OT.

Wiki: The Urartian, Vannic, (in older literature) Chaldean (Khaldian, or Haldian)[citation needed] language was spoken by the inhabitants of the ancient kingdom of Urartu, located in the region of Lake Van, with its capital near the site of the modern town of Van, in the Armenian Highland, modern-day Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey.[2]

Seems from this that Abraham was an Urartian or Khaldian so the "God" figure is Khaldi.
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22-02-2017, 10:14 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
So, I think I've beaten that one to death.
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22-02-2017, 10:39 AM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(20-02-2017 02:28 AM)Robvalue Wrote:  
(19-02-2017 01:00 PM)mordant Wrote:  The most common short explanation is that the English word "god" originates in the German "gott" and is related to the Dutch "god". Beyond that, digging deeper into prot-Germanic sources ...

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=god

... it is speculated that it evolved from "that which is invoked".

My favorite takedown of the name of god is in Terry Prachett, don't remember which of his books, in which he describes a nation-state whose god is named "Nuggin". It's a very authoritarian society that's clearly designed to poke fun at religious fundamentalists; the priesthood is always adding things to the Book of Nuggin that qualify as "an abomination unto Nuggin". I find that hilarious because "Nuggin" sounds like a child's cuddle toy and it sort of highlights the ridiculousness of all this asserted authority and umbrage.

"That which is invoked at every opportunity to explain everything."

"That which is invoked every time there is no real explanation".

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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22-02-2017, 01:00 PM (This post was last modified: 22-02-2017 01:03 PM by Deltabravo.)
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(22-02-2017 09:07 AM)Deltabravo Wrote:  
(20-02-2017 12:04 PM)Norm Deplume Wrote:  William the Bastard's father was Robert, Duke of Normandy. There is some confusion with the Duke sometimes being Robert I and sometimes Robert II with his ancestor Rollo (or Hrolf) being Robert I. There may be further confusion since Rollo's (or Robert's or Hrolf's) son and heir was William Longsword.

There have been eight King Henrys but also eight Edwards.

[As eny fule kno two of the Henrys, IV and VI were divided into parts, two and three respectively, so the grand total is eleven.]

Yes, you are right. Rollo was the great-great-great-grandfather of William I.

But he was still a pagan/Christian, from my limited research.

Anyway, the point I am making is that Abraham was from Ur of the Chaldees, according to the OT. The Chadeans were these people in the region of Van who worshipped Khaldi. The Urartians would seem to fit the bill as the people being referred to in the OT.

Wiki: The Urartian, Vannic, (in older literature) Chaldean (Khaldian, or Haldian)[citation needed] language was spoken by the inhabitants of the ancient kingdom of Urartu, located in the region of Lake Van, with its capital near the site of the modern town of Van, in the Armenian Highland, modern-day Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey.[2]

Seems from this that Abraham was an Urartian or Khaldian so the "God" figure is Khaldi.

Yes, you are absolutely spot on. The Jews of Abraham were Khaldians who worshipped Khaldi. That's what "GOD" means. It's just a way of saying "Khald" and therefore, when we talk about "GOD" we are referring to a man on top of a lion with wings. And not an elastic concept.

"God" finally debunked.
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22-02-2017, 01:10 PM
RE: The origin of the word "God"
(22-02-2017 01:00 PM)Deltabravo Wrote:  It's just a way of saying "Khald" and therefore, when we talk about "GOD" we are referring to a man on top of a lion with wings. And not an elastic concept.

"God" finally debunked.

Not if God is a man on top of a lion with wings it's not.

#sigh
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