Theism a mental illness?
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28-06-2015, 03:16 AM
RE: Theism a mental illness?
(20-06-2015 02:28 PM)Anjele Wrote:  So many people are raised in the religion of their parents that I don't think you can say it's a mental illness. Religion is taught from the womb on. It's very cultural. If your whole family follows a faith practice and it's what you have known your whole life then there isn't even a way to prove that mental illness came first (if ever).

People who come to religion at a later date are often looking for some sort of answers to fill in things they can't figure out. They need an answer and religion tends to have a way of seeping into any gaps. Some also go through something harrowing and come out the other side and they have a need to find the reason they made it.

When I get really confused on religion and mental illness is when women kill their kids and claim god told them to do it. Or they say the child was possessed. Usually it's someone who was living in religion and then their brain broke and suddenly it's all 'god said'. Those scenarios are quite tangled, then it seems that one (religion) feeds on two (mental illness) and back again.

When a person "leaves the nest", they are supposed to be able to think for themselves. A lot of people don't. They just do things like their parents did. That's fine. Do they believe in the same gods their parents did? Belief is too strong a word. They say they do because it is easy. They say they do because they really can't be arsed to actually THINK'. So, they go on doing and saying much the same as their parents because they just can't be bothered to do otherwise. Besides, to say and do otherwise will bring them into conflict with others and that would never do.

Are these people mentally ill?

No, because they don't know whether they believe or not because they haven't actually thought about it. They just say they do because it's easy to.

Idle?

Yes, but not mentally ill.

It's the people that have thought about it and come to the conclusion that god exists that have mental issues. One blogger I once came across said that belief in god is a psychosis.

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28-06-2015, 05:31 AM
RE: Theism a mental illness?
Of COURSE religion is a mental illness.

The only reason it's not recognized as such?

The lunatics are running the asylum.

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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01-07-2015, 04:52 AM
RE: Theism a mental illness?
(28-06-2015 03:16 AM)god has no twitter account Wrote:  
(20-06-2015 02:28 PM)Anjele Wrote:  So many people are raised in the religion of their parents that I don't think you can say it's a mental illness. Religion is taught from the womb on. It's very cultural. If your whole family follows a faith practice and it's what you have known your whole life then there isn't even a way to prove that mental illness came first (if ever).

People who come to religion at a later date are often looking for some sort of answers to fill in things they can't figure out. They need an answer and religion tends to have a way of seeping into any gaps. Some also go through something harrowing and come out the other side and they have a need to find the reason they made it.

When I get really confused on religion and mental illness is when women kill their kids and claim god told them to do it. Or they say the child was possessed. Usually it's someone who was living in religion and then their brain broke and suddenly it's all 'god said'. Those scenarios are quite tangled, then it seems that one (religion) feeds on two (mental illness) and back again.

When a person "leaves the nest", they are supposed to be able to think for themselves. A lot of people don't. They just do things like their parents did. That's fine. Do they believe in the same gods their parents did? Belief is too strong a word. They say they do because it is easy. They say they do because they really can't be arsed to actually THINK'. So, they go on doing and saying much the same as their parents because they just can't be bothered to do otherwise. Besides, to say and do otherwise will bring them into conflict with others and that would never do.

Are these people mentally ill?

No, because they don't know whether they believe or not because they haven't actually thought about it. They just say they do because it's easy to.

Idle?

Yes, but not mentally ill.

It's the people that have thought about it and come to the conclusion that god exists that have mental issues. One blogger I once came across said that belief in god is a psychosis.
Nothing about Faith is easy. If it was everyone would swallow there pride and attempt it if just to see. Atheist are the ones who are delusional. To them there is no reality that there men made system of proof can't disassemble but they blindly overlook the fact that science doesn't know shit about the mind. Except for chemicals do stuff. Wow, real lean observation. Our mind is responsible for all understanding, instinct, and all real meaning through genuine feeling or reaction through emotion. Everything we do or don't do stems an emotional reaction. These emotions are the base of everything. You can tell if something is wrong or right often times with feeling alone.

If a dog is locked up and in happy and you pay any attention to it whatsoever you will feel that dogs sorrow. Not through empathy. The dog radiates its negative feeling, and we can pick up on that.

If a person is an addict of any sort and isn't completely disconnected from their own reality they will feel worthless when they start to come down off whatever addiction they were high on. They will dislike them selves and think why did I do that. I knew better, and that it would cause pain so how did I let myself do it.

Why do we cage animals and succumb to addictions and societal norms as we know they are wrong to ourselves and other beings?

Self deception, and confusion.

The mind shows us all these things and the opposite side of the coin as well. It does it's job in some of us. Others have seemingly disconnected from the minds reality in favor or a single view that uses none of our senses that we are supposed to use. Including the mind.

The Lord isn't always found through parenting or growing and people that are born into religion often times take it for granted and never make a real connection between reality and there so called Faith.
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01-07-2015, 06:26 AM
RE: Theism a mental illness?
(20-06-2015 07:48 AM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  I mean, by this definition we are all in certain moments mentally ill, when scared, we act irrationally. Is it just that religion is a prolonged response to fear? Some people eventually succumb to empiricism, some die whilst encumbered with this condition. Could it be that theism is actually just a temporary response to a specific factor, and that mortality is the only thing that presents all people from eventually becoming rational, because they die before doing so?

I'd like to preface my main point, regarding the quotation above, by stating that I have a difficult time, always, filing a theistic belief in the same folder as a mental illness. My mother is wicked smart, well organized, thoughtful, realistic, hungry for knowledge, compassionate (even to a fault), & at least a majority of the plethora of traits humanity should look for in a good, sane, person. I don't know, for sure, how she is still a devout Catholic, but I can point to factors (childhood rearing, fear of death, hard divorce with my father, etc.) that I think are stronger reasons for her faith. (Maybe those are combined stresses that birthed a mental illness? Does she seek, as plenty of people would, to fend off these stresses in the place she was taught to do so as a child? When I tell my mom her son is an atheist, I should remember to ask her that last question.) Perhaps I want to delude myself into thinking my mother's faith is not a mental illness, but it seems more likely to me that, at least in the case of any otherwise rational person, any "umbrella" term used to describe the mental state of the theistic falls short of the myriad tones of grey that permeate life, & a conscious brain. That being typed....

Death, in my view, seems to be the largest hurdle in overcoming faith-based thinking. It always struck me as bizarre to discuss the fear of death with a theist, because it never seemed their beliefs did much to counteract it. They were just as afraid, but merely pacified to have an answer that nearly negates the "reaper." I have only known peace of mind, in the arena of death, since I let go of any notion of "life after death," & the despot reported to offer it.

"First, first I've said repeatedly that this stuff [(religion)] cannot be taken away from people, it is their favourite toy, and it will remain so as long - as [Sigmund] Freud said, in The Future Of An Illusion - it will remain that way as long as we're afraid of death and have that problem which is, I think, will likely be a very long time." -Christopher Hitchens
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01-07-2015, 06:33 AM
RE: Theism a mental illness?
(20-06-2015 01:20 PM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  Faith - the belief in something without evidence.

Delusion: an idiosyncratic belief or impression that is firmly maintained despite being contradicted by what is generally accepted as reality or rational argument, typically a symptom of mental disorder. A belief held with strong conviction despite superior evidence to the contrary.

Religion - The embracement of delusion.
What is generally accepted as reality is not always what is rational. By that standard, a non-believer would be considered delusional.

In general, if the majority determines a norm, i.e. an expectation, then atheists are clearly the outliers.

I think one should be careful not to conflate rational and normal. Diagnosing mental illness can incorporate a healthy dose of subjectivity.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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