Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
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27-11-2013, 05:53 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(26-11-2013 06:06 PM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  You being from Greece, I can sort of understand why American cuisine may come off as less than spectacular. I think some of the only foods from here that interest me are Southern, and mostly those inspired by other countries (like gumbo and jambalaya). I personally love the small amount of Mediterranean foods I've managed to try here, and I'm sure most of it isn't exactly traditional.

The truth is our cuisine is heavily influenced by the Middle Eastern and Turkish one, which means it's heavy on spices and herbs. It's heavy in general, tons of butter and tons of olive oil. I'm used to the very intense taste that a combination of 92837429 spices gives, without it being actually hot, like Indian food.
So I guess the American one might seem a little bland to us.

(26-11-2013 06:06 PM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  As to your comment on salad, from what I've read it seems the American concept of "salad" has diverged a bit from the rest of the world. Our typical meal salad is about half filled with some leafy green. It's OK for me, but I honestly prefer salads without it. I read the a more typical salad in Greece will be more similar to something like Tabouli. Is that so? more chopped vegetables and cheese with perhaps some oil? I much prefer salads like that. And I love feta, especially on salads, but it can be expensive here.

The most typical salad here is the Greek salad Tongue Tomatoes, onions, peppers, cucumbers and feta, all drowned in tons of olive oil. Other common salads are shredded cabbage with carrots and lettuce with chives. But these are just a compensation when we don't have the great tasting tomatoes of the summer.

Even when there's no salad on the table, 98% of the time there will be a small plate with feta in it. It goes great with meals (especially anything with a tomato sauce) like peas, lentil soup, stuffed tomatoes, cooked vegetables and fries. Yes. Feta with homemade fries. And oregano. You should definitely try that.

(26-11-2013 06:06 PM)Cardinal Smurf Wrote:  If you decide to try a Peanut Butter & Jelly sandwich, I recommend doing it right or your first impression may be poor. Nice, soft wheat bread, crunchy peanut butter (smooth is OK too, but less interesting), and, most important, the right preserves: Knott's Berry Farm Boysenberry Preserves (with seeds!). Any other fruit spread risks being mediocre.

We're lucky to have some awesome bakeries in my hometown and the bread is always amazing! And I think I'll go with my mum's homemade jam Wink

(26-11-2013 07:10 PM)Stark Raving Wrote:  The first that comes to mind is barbecue. A brisket, smoked Texas style, is about a American as it gets. It has all the great things my neighbours to the south have to offer. It is a loud, bold flavour. It's hearty, and a good barbecue chef is unashamed of the seasonings s/he uses. They are applied liberally in most cases, and they pack a punch. The best barbecue is made from the toughest cuts of meat. Cooked with patience, and anticipation. Barbecue has that attitude only Americans can pull off. It's ready when it's ready.

Well, that definitely sounds delicious Smile
But I don't know, roasting on coals is a big thing here too. And you're right, it takes the right person to do it, only a few can. But I'm sure there are some who can make it perfect here too Wink


Now I just remembered why I was wondering about McDonalds. I consider Greece to be a country with not just delicious food, but also with many cheap options to eat well. So I'm amazed by how tourists tend to prefer McDonalds when there are cheaper and much better things to eat here. We even have our own "version" of McDonalds which, quality-wise and taste-wise is incomparable. I wish people did their research before visiting other countries Dodgy

I also forgot to mention that I have no idea what maple syrup is like (yeah, I know this one's Canadian but I'm sure it's available there) and the only one I can buy is a tiny bottle that costs around 8$ Dodgy

Oh, and I don't understand why half your recipes have "cake mix" as an ingredient. We don't use cake mixes here. The ingredients of a cake mix should be available in any home at any time. It's not even time consuming to make. Why so lazy? Rolleyes


Now I think I will open a new thread on Greek cuisine with recipes and see if you can handle it! Big Grin

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27-11-2013, 09:32 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(27-11-2013 05:53 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  Oh, and I don't understand why half your recipes have "cake mix" as an ingredient. We don't use cake mixes here. The ingredients of a cake mix should be available in any home at any time. It's not even time consuming to make. Why so lazy? Rolleyes
You are probably looking at some website with user created recipes. Using premade mixes while cooking/baking usually doesn't count as cooking/baking IMO.
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07-01-2014, 07:15 PM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(26-11-2013 01:55 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  I honestly do not understand why every single one of the sweet ones I have tried are so extremely sweet. I recently tried making buttercream (which is something we definitely don't make here) for some cupcakes and it turned so nauseatingly sweet that I had to throw it away. Even with less sugar it was simply too heavy. And that was the end of my short affair with buttercream.

Whoa there little lady! There are Greek desserts that are amongst the sweetest in existence:

Baklava
Loukoumades
Kataifi

All of these are literally dripping with sugar syrup.
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08-01-2014, 05:51 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(07-01-2014 07:15 PM)Chippy Wrote:  
(26-11-2013 01:55 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  I honestly do not understand why every single one of the sweet ones I have tried are so extremely sweet. I recently tried making buttercream (which is something we definitely don't make here) for some cupcakes and it turned so nauseatingly sweet that I had to throw it away. Even with less sugar it was simply too heavy. And that was the end of my short affair with buttercream.

Whoa there little lady! There are Greek desserts that are amongst the sweetest in existence:

Baklava
Loukoumades
Kataifi

All of these are literally dripping with sugar syrup.

Yeap, and that's why they are to be eaten in small pieces Wink

Plus, sugar on its own is not so nauseating, but sugar with tons of butter/chocolate/cream? I don't know if it's the same.

I can personally eat maybe a big piece of baklava, but not even a spoonfull of buttercream or whipped cream.

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08-01-2014, 07:08 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(08-01-2014 05:51 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(07-01-2014 07:15 PM)Chippy Wrote:  Whoa there little lady! There are Greek desserts that are amongst the sweetest in existence:

Baklava
Loukoumades
Kataifi

All of these are literally dripping with sugar syrup.

Yeap, and that's why they are to be eaten in small pieces Wink

Plus, sugar on its own is not so nauseating, but sugar with tons of butter/chocolate/cream? I don't know if it's the same.

I can personally eat maybe a big piece of baklava, but not even a spoonfull of buttercream or whipped cream.

Yabut, butter cream and whipped cream aren't for eating on their own, any more than mustard or horseradish are. Dodgy

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08-01-2014, 07:10 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(07-01-2014 07:15 PM)Chippy Wrote:  
(26-11-2013 01:55 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  I honestly do not understand why every single one of the sweet ones I have tried are so extremely sweet. I recently tried making buttercream (which is something we definitely don't make here) for some cupcakes and it turned so nauseatingly sweet that I had to throw it away. Even with less sugar it was simply too heavy. And that was the end of my short affair with buttercream.

Whoa there little lady! There are Greek desserts that are amongst the sweetest in existence:

Baklava
Loukoumades
Kataifi

All of these are literally dripping with sugar syrup.

Don't know about the other two, but baklava is dripping with honey.

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08-01-2014, 07:19 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(08-01-2014 07:08 AM)Chas Wrote:  Yabut, butter cream and whipped cream aren't for eating on their own, any more than mustard or horseradish are. Dodgy

Yabut, sugar syrup is not for eating on its own either. It's just on top of many many layers of phyllo Wink

Ok, let's put it this way. I can eat a whole big piece of baklava, but I can't even take one bite of a cupcake topped with butter cream. Better?


(08-01-2014 07:10 AM)Chas Wrote:  Don't know about the other two, but baklava is dripping with honey.

Not really. Loukoumades are served with honey. The other two are made with sugar syrup. I'm 100% sure about the Greek baklava and about 98% about the Turkish one.

Honey may be added to the syrup, but it's never on its own.

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08-01-2014, 11:42 AM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(08-01-2014 07:19 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(08-01-2014 07:08 AM)Chas Wrote:  Yabut, butter cream and whipped cream aren't for eating on their own, any more than mustard or horseradish are. Dodgy

Yabut, sugar syrup is not for eating on its own either. It's just on top of many many layers of phyllo Wink

Ok, let's put it this way. I can eat a whole big piece of baklava, but I can't even take one bite of a cupcake topped with butter cream. Better?

Maybe you have too much frosting on the cupcake? What's your recipe? I only use butter, sugar, flavoring.

Quote:
(08-01-2014 07:10 AM)Chas Wrote:  Don't know about the other two, but baklava is dripping with honey.

Not really. Loukoumades are served with honey. The other two are made with sugar syrup. I'm 100% sure about the Greek baklava and about 98% about the Turkish one.

Honey may be added to the syrup, but it's never on its own.

Thanks - learned something new. I had thought it was only honey.

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08-01-2014, 12:27 PM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(08-01-2014 07:19 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  Ok, let's put it this way. I can eat a whole big piece of baklava, but I can't even take one bite of a cupcake topped with butter cream. Better?

You know, me too. I can eat baklava, but I can't eat American frosting. I can't stand the sweetness of it. I don't know why that is. I have thrown things I bought and things that were baked and given to me out because I can't eat that sweet stuff. Well, I ate the cake part that wasn't touched by frosting, but the rest went in the trash.

Baklava - I enjoy it, although I can't eat a lot of it either.

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08-01-2014, 01:08 PM
RE: Things I want to say (and ask) about American food
(08-01-2014 12:27 PM)Dom Wrote:  
(08-01-2014 07:19 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  Ok, let's put it this way. I can eat a whole big piece of baklava, but I can't even take one bite of a cupcake topped with butter cream. Better?

You know, me too. I can eat baklava, but I can't eat American frosting. I can't stand the sweetness of it. I don't know why that is. I have thrown things I bought and things that were baked and given to me out because I can't eat that sweet stuff. Well, I ate the cake part that wasn't touched by frosting, but the rest went in the trash.

Baklava - I enjoy it, although I can't eat a lot of it either.

I swear you people must be eating something that isn't actually butter cream frosting. Consider

Bakeries and grocery stores make frosting out of things that aren't butter (like vegetable shortening or margarine), yet they will call it butter cream (or buttercream or buttercreme).

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