Thought experiment.
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24-08-2015, 07:53 AM
Thought experiment.
So I was laying on my bed thinking about how shit my life is and this thought came into my head. I thought it was interesting so I thought I'd share with the group.

Children are required by law to give 10% of their income to their parents/caregiver/person who raised them for the life of the parent/caregiver/person who raised them.

What happens?

Obviously you have a new kind of welfare bludgeoner, parents that just give the money back. But would it be some sort of incentive for parents to raise their children right and emphasize education and such? As in would it be beneficial in the macro sense or would too many individual problems arise for it to be effective?

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24-08-2015, 07:59 AM
RE: Thought experiment.
(24-08-2015 07:53 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  So I was laying on my bed thinking about how shit my life is and this thought came into my head. I thought it was interesting so I thought I'd share with the group.

Children are required by law to give 10% of their income to their parents/caregiver/person who raised them for the life of the parent/caregiver/person who raised them.

What happens?

Obviously you have a new kind of welfare bludgeoner, parents that just give the money back. But would it be some sort of incentive for parents to raise their children right and emphasize education and such? As in would it be beneficial in the macro sense or would too many individual problems arise for it to be effective?

Parents would be incentivized to do whatever it takes to maximize their children's earning potential and also to have a lot of children.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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24-08-2015, 08:08 AM
RE: Thought experiment.
(24-08-2015 07:53 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  So I was laying on my bed thinking about how shit my life is and this thought came into my head. I thought it was interesting so I thought I'd share with the group.

Children are required by law to give 10% of their income to their parents/caregiver/person who raised them for the life of the parent/caregiver/person who raised them.

What happens?

Obviously you have a new kind of welfare bludgeoner, parents that just give the money back. But would it be some sort of incentive for parents to raise their children right and emphasize education and such? As in would it be beneficial in the macro sense or would too many individual problems arise for it to be effective?

What were you laying, on your bed?

The system you advocate is already in place (culturally rather than legally) in many parts of Asia. Children consider it their duty to look after / earn for / send money back to their parents.

Of course, in the examples of which I am aware, there parents are unaware of how their children (in particular, young ladies) are earning the money.

The thought of Murikan men supporting Vietnamese families does have a small appealing irony, though.

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24-08-2015, 08:27 AM
RE: Thought experiment.
Quote:Parents would be incentivized to do whatever it takes to maximize their children's earning potential

Would that be a bad or good thing?

Quote:also to have a lot of children.

Would it though? You still gotta raise them for 18 or so years before you start to see a return.
Longer if they go to university. And than you gotta earn your investment back.

Assumingly it costs $180,000 to raise a child to 18.
Say they earn $40,000 a year. That means you gotta wait 45 years before you start making a profit. (obviously simplified math not including inflation and such). You'll probably be dead by than.

So IMO it would make more financial sense to have fewer children and go for quality over quantity.
Have 1 or 2 children and focus your resources on up-skilling them to become doctors or lawyers or whatever.

Quote:What were you laying, on your bed?

myself

Quote:The system you advocate is already in place (culturally rather than legally) in many parts of Asia. Children consider it their duty to look after / earn for / send money back to their parents.

Of course, in the examples of which I am aware, there parents are unaware of how their children (in particular, young ladies) are earning the money.

The thought of Murikan men supporting Vietnamese families does have a small appealing irony, though.

Good point. But as you say, that's the culture. It would be interesting to see, if it was possible, to see the difference between culturally implemented like it is now and formally legally implemented and if it breed a different result.

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24-08-2015, 08:35 AM
RE: Thought experiment.
(24-08-2015 08:27 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
Quote:Parents would be incentivized to do whatever it takes to maximize their children's earning potential

Would that be a bad or good thing?

Quote:also to have a lot of children.

Would it though? You still gotta raise them for 18 or so years before you start to see a return.
Longer if they go to university. And than you gotta earn your investment back.

Assumingly it costs $180,000 to raise a child to 18.
Say they earn $40,000 a year. That means you gotta wait 45 years before you start making a profit. (obviously simplified math not including inflation and such). You'll probably be dead by than.

So IMO it would make more financial sense to have fewer children and go for quality over quantity.
Have 1 or 2 children and focus your resources on up-skilling them to become doctors or lawyers or whatever.

Don't finance a university education - put them in the trades e.g. electrician, plumber, pipe fitter, contractor, etc. They will earn substantial income with minimal investment.

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Science is not a subject, but a method.
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24-08-2015, 08:36 AM
RE: Thought experiment.
Wouldn't work.

Parents who would like to have 10% of their childrens income, are the bad kind of parents in the first place.
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24-08-2015, 08:48 AM
RE: Thought experiment.
First, raising a kid to make lots of money is not necessarily the same thing as raising a kid right. You wanna see what a child under pressure looks like, look no further than a household where the quality of the parents' retirement is directly proportional to the financial success of their kid(s). Yes, there are cultures where this is the norm, and there's a reason suicide rates go through the fucking roof after college entrance exams are completed each year. They've been told from the day they were born that they are going to get perfect scores in school, go on to college to become an engineer or a doctor, finish college, and immediately get married and begin having kids of their own to continue the cycle. If we're going to praise the emergence of individualism in the modern world, the last thing we need is to give parents another reason to push their own views of success onto their kids.

Second, and this part is more my personal political stance, but it's just not the government's responsibility. You can't force people to make what you consider to be good decisions. You can provide them with the option to do so, but ultimately you have to let cultural evolution choose its path. If you have to make a law saying that kids should care for their elders, then your country's culture has already failed and the best such laws can do is piss everyone off as they spiral into self destruction.

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24-08-2015, 05:59 PM
RE: Thought experiment.
fuckin' earmuffs.

#sigh
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