Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
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17-01-2018, 06:07 AM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
(17-01-2018 01:47 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  I would say that protest remained somewhat potent political tool.

And double-edged sword. E.g. Charlottesville.

We'll love you just the way you are
If you're perfect -- Alanis Morissette
(06-02-2014 03:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  And I'm giving myself a conclusion again from all the facepalming.
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17-01-2018, 06:21 AM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
(17-01-2018 06:07 AM)morondog Wrote:  
(17-01-2018 01:47 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  I would say that protest remained somewhat potent political tool.

And double-edged sword. E.g. Charlottesville.

No need for Charlottesville. Protests can be easily shown as destructive events when media are in hands of ruling clique.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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17-01-2018, 08:46 AM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
(16-01-2018 10:49 PM)Kaneda Wrote:  
(16-01-2018 10:19 PM)JDog554 Wrote:  World always has been shit, world is shit and world will always be shit. Spend so much time worrying about the bad things that could but may never happen, you miss out on all the good things you can make happen.

Thank you for that. I mean it.

I love what you chose to do for your signature, by the way.

You're welcome.

Thanks. Nishi was an inspiration.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
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17-01-2018, 10:21 AM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
I worry that they will eventually have to give a shit.
My energies go toward taking care of my family and having a modest bit of space to relax.
I admit that I try not to think about the tide that will eventually find it's way to my door no matter what I do. And I really worry about my kids.

But I've found a certain peace in the attitude that George Carlin had.



[Image: barfly_condenados_pelo_vicio.gif]
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17-01-2018, 11:12 AM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
Giving up and retreating into being "mere spectators" is an insufficient response when we are ourselves a part of the problem. In the case of climate change, for instance, we are all involved, so every little effort can make a little difference.
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17-01-2018, 12:47 PM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
(16-01-2018 09:36 PM)Kaneda Wrote:  Sometimes I wonder if the ubiquity of the internet has stymied the culture of civic protest around the world. When everybody has a platform to air their grievances right at their fingertips, it can be easy, or even downright tempting, for most of us to make our voices heared and feel like we’re forwarding a cause without ever leaving the house.

But then you look at the way it's been harnessed in Iran and elsewhere to help organize protests. Matter of fact, the authorities in Iran recently shut down several apps because they were being used for planning the protests.

It's all in how you use it.
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21-01-2018, 11:19 AM
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
"Depression and anxiety afflict Americans who are concerned with the fate of the environment, according to a study of the mental health effects of climate change. Most hard-hit are women and people with low incomes who worry about the planet’s long-term health, said the study published this week in the journal Global Environmental Change. Symptoms include restless nights, feelings of loneliness and lethargy. 'Climate change is a persistent global stressor,' said Sabrina Helm, lead author of the paper and professor of family and consumer sciences at the University of Arizona."

"Signs of depression do not appear in people concerned about climate change’s risks to humanity but do appear in people worried about its impact on other species, plants and nature overall, the research said. The study pulled from 342 online surveys of respondents whose views broadly reflect the wider U.S. population, it said."

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-c...ign=buffer
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14-03-2018, 02:20 PM (This post was last modified: 14-03-2018 03:08 PM by Kaneda.)
RE: Thread for Those Worried About the State of the World
I want to try and keep this thread updated every so often for anyone who might get something out of it. For today I’m just going to leave a relevant op-ed here in case anyone wants to engage with it. I personally found it to be fairly profound and think the author speaks well to a general audience in this, as is usually the case with him.

As someone whose seen his fair share of cynical opportunism in the news media and waded though a lot of questionable reporting, I find the author’s straightforward style, inured wisdom and relentless political skepticism very refreshing. The guy never fails to get me to log in for a healthy bit of topical commentary, or the occasional think-piece, on a regular basis. I’d highly recommend checking his blog out if the thought ever passes you by.




By Ian Welsh

“For those who think ahead, for those who are empathetic, for those who work for justice or kindness, the world can be a horrible place.
We look around and we see the decline of nations. We see people dying, being tortured, being raped who need not die or suffer. We look to the environment and we see that species are being killed so fast we’re in the middle of a great die-off; or we look to the biosphere and the oxygen cycle and we worry that we could see a collapse of both.

We know that much of the suffering in the world is needless; that there is more than enough food to feed everyone, that many wars are wars of choice which hurt many to enrich a very few, and we know that many who brutalize others are receiving no security or even money in return. We look at how prisoners are treated in jail, and we know that the primitive lust for vengeance is creating monsters for we understand the cycle of abuse: Those who are abused, become abusers.

We see the rise of a surveillance state that may eventually cause the Stasi to look like amateurs and which is already more sophisticated than anything Orwell imagined. We see that the masses of the people in the developed world are being impoverished, generation after generation. And worse, we see our own efforts at stopping all of this fail. We worry that our efforts are not even slowing the worst of it.

And for many of us it hits home closer. We, or our loved ones, are among those suffering: losing our lives, homes, livelihoods, or living lives of despair.

For years, I lived in a state of rage. Not even anger, but rage. Rage at those like Bush and Blair who were mass murderers. Rage at those who did not stop them but could have. Rage at those who believed all the lies, whether those lies were about economics, war, or crime.

I see many who come to my blog, a place where scenarios are explored which are both bleak, and often, very likely, giving into despair or rage themselves. The world is big, the powers that are leading it to ruin are overwhelming, and we look out on a future which seems to get worse and worse the further ahead of us it is. Even countries now on the rise, like China, will suffer massively in the decades to come.

It is perfectly natural to be angry. It is even useful to be angry. Anger or rage are adrenaline shots to the system. They push you to do what must be done; to tell the truth; to push ahead, to tackle the big enemies.
But they are toxic in the long run. Like adrenaline, they are useful for shots of energy, but if you are angry all the time at anything, it will hurt your body and eventually your mind. You will burn out, and if you aren’t lucky, you may burn out permanently or you may die.

Despair is also rational. I am aware of studies which show that depression is about 10X more frequent today than it was about a century ago, based on methodology I find reasonable. Life today sucks. We are almost all close to powerless in our daily lives: We work for wages, without those wages we will suffer greatly, and to get those wages we must do what our bosses say, no matter how noxious their demands. It takes two people to earn a living where it once took one, and wealth and income are collapsing in the first and most of the third world ex-China; while the Chinese are under the immense pressure that industrialization produces.

Anger gets us going, until we burn out. Despair enervates us. We turn often to drugs, whether pharmaceutical or to more subtle opiates like television or computer games. Too often we do not change our circumstances: We see no way out, and en masse we aren’t necessarily wrong. Leave one job, and even if you find another, it will be run by the same sort of people who run almost all of Western business, outside of a few European countries.

All of this is understandable. In a certain sense it is even rational.
But a hot cup of chocolate on a frosty night is still sweet.
As bad as things are, so much of the world is as it always has been. The still contentment of sitting with one you love, saying nothing is still available. The sunset is still beautiful, and if there are fewer birds, their trills still delight.

The flowers are as beautiful, the russet and scarlet leaves of fall still adorn the trees, and a clean drink of water still refreshes. Children playing still bring a smile to my face, and I still enjoy pulling a comforter up and cracking open a new book. There are still beautiful women and handsome men, there is still kindness and charity in the world; there is still art to make and books to write and songs to sing.

In a myriad of ways, there is still beauty and happiness to be found in the world. We are not the first culture to face decline. The Roman Empire went through multiple periods of decline and stoics and epicureans debated how to live the good life in an evil world. The Chinese practically had dealing with declining and corrupt imperial eras and warring states periods down to an art: When no good could be done in the world, one returned to one’s private life to write poetry, drink wine, and care for those close to one while refusing as much as possible to be complicit in the evil of the times.
Others strove still to be of public service, to hold off the rush of night for a few more years, or even a generation, knowing that what came after would be worse.

But I say to you now this: Endless anger or despair, or a mixture of both do you no good. Soon, they do do your enemies no harm (and yes, they are enemies) and they serve not your chosen cause unless you’re willing to risk permanent burn-out.

And besides, where’s the fun in being miserable? No matter how bad the times, there will always be good periods, moments and beauty and happiness in which to delight. The wine is as sweet in evil times as good; love is perhaps even sweeter in times of despair; and beauty never dies and can always be found, if only, sometimes, in our own minds.
It’s banal to say we’re here for a short time, but it’s true. Fight the good fight, to be sure, but then delight in the sensual pleasures and love this world offers.

And give yourself permission to quit. There are seven billion people in the world. It’s not on all on you. The graveyards are full of essential men: The world will continue without you, and it’s not all on you. Take the breaks you need, even quit if you must. Above all, don’t let the bastards see you sweat, and don’t let them take away your enjoyment of the real pleasures that life offers.”

(Originally published October 27, 2014. Republished March 27, 2017. Republished Again, March 10, 2018)
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