Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
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22-09-2013, 11:43 AM
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
Da fuq? All my references show Psalms 101 as having only 8 verses. ... Help a brother out here Bucky, where da fuq Psalms 101:16 come from?

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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22-09-2013, 12:04 PM
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 11:26 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Oh. That report that the Roman Curia was employing male prostitutes in the Italian press.
Tongue

Wasteful, wasteful, they could just sleep with each other and leave the heathens out of it.

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22-09-2013, 12:06 PM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2013 12:58 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 11:43 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  Da fuq? All my references show Psalms 101 as having only 8 verses. ... Help a brother out here Bucky, where da fuq Psalms 101:16 come from?

Well ya see, he's one of those (VERY CONSERVATIVE NUT JOB) "Old Fart Cat-O-Licks".
He goes to a Latin Mass, I suppose. He thinks magic works better in Latin. (Kind of intellectual snobbery, ya know). Makes them feel very "special". The Hebrew Masoretic numbering and the Vulgate numbering systems are different. Most Cat-O-Licks, (in the New American Bible, number that Psalm as 102, which is where the quote comes from). The other system has it as 101. It's quite a depressing psalm. The writer is complaining to his god. He quoted only the "triumphalist" verse.
He thinks he's very special. Most of the Roman Church does not use the Extraordinary Form. Pope Benny cooked that up and allowed it, and for one of the first times in history, an official split in their official liturgy. Most of the RC Church does not use the Extraordinary Form. Only the ultra-conservative old farts use that one. Any normal Catholic Church you would have gone to today would not have used the "Extraordinary Form". They're kinda "weirdos", and even most Catholics think they're a bit odd.

They never quote :
Psalm 39 :
"Turn your gaze away from me, that I may smile again,
before I depart, and am no more"

Psalm 115 :
The dead do not praise the Lord,
nor do any that go down into silence".

Immortality had not been invented yet, in Hebrew culture, and the Bible.

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Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
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22-09-2013, 12:27 PM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2013 12:36 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 12:06 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  
(22-09-2013 11:43 AM)GirlyMan Wrote:  Da fuq? All my references show Psalms 101 as having only 8 verses. ... Help a brother out here Bucky, where da fuq Psalms 101:16 come from?

Well ya see, he's one of those (VERY CONSERVATIVE NUT JOB) "Old Fart Cat-O-Licks".
He goes to a Latin Mass, I suppose. He thinks magic works better in Latin. (Kind of intellectual snobbery, ya know). Makes them feel very "special". The Hebrew Masoretic numbering and the Vulgate numbering systems are different. Most Cat-O-Licks, (in the New American Bible, number that Psalm as 102, which is where the quote comes from). ...

I mean I'm drunk and whatnot but I can't find that verse in Psalms 102? Is it allegorical?

(22-09-2013 12:06 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  They never quote :
Psalm 39 :
"Turn your gaze away from me, that I may smile again,
before I depart, and am no more"

Psalm 115 :
The dead do not praise the Lord,
nor do any that go down into silence".

Immortality had not been invented yet, in Hebrew culture, and the Bible.

Methinks we is better off without it.

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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22-09-2013, 12:43 PM
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 12:06 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  ...
Psalm 115 :
The dead do not praise the Lord,
nor do any that go down into silence".

Immortality had not been invented yet, in Hebrew culture, and the Bible.

I took us Jews a bit longer to learn how to make a buck, Bucky, or we would have thought of it first.

We only started getting the hang of the money thing once we had been ostracised and relegated to the only people allowed to perform usury.

See Merchant of Venice etc.

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22-09-2013, 01:10 PM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2013 02:22 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
In the KJV, and the Revised Standard Version it's Psalm 102, Verse 15, (not 16, like he said). In the NAV, it's verse 16.
Anyone who knows Latin knows the word "gentes" is NOT "gentiles". It is always translated as "nations". "Omnes gentes" is always correctly translated as "all nations", or using the article, as "all the nations". All the versions in Latin use 'omnes gentes" so he purposely chose to give a "racist" ("divisional") spin/nuance to the psalm, which is actually completely absent in the actual piece of original literature. For example, in the absolutely (stunningly) beautiful concluding Psalm (150), of the Mozart "Solemn Vespers of a Confessor", it says "Laudate Dominum, omnes gentes" etc, and it would NEVER EVER EVER be translated as "Praise the Lord, all you *gentiles*". That's simply preposterous.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlWaCkOewUM

(He's an amateur. He's another religious nut suffering from Dunning -Kruger effect. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%...ger_effect
The attempted "superiority" picture here seems to fit.)

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Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
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22-09-2013, 01:23 PM
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 01:10 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  In the KJV, and the Revised Standard Version it's Psalm 102, Verse 15, (not 16, like he said). In the NAV, it's verse 16.
Anyone who knows Latin knows the word "gentes" is NOT "gentiles". It is always translated as "nations". "Omnes gentes" is always correctly translated as "all nations", or using the article, as "all the nations". All the versions in Latin use 'omnes gentes" so he purposely chose to give a "racist" ("divisional") spin/nuance to the psalm, which is actually completely absent in the actual piece of original literature. For example, in the absolutely (stunningly) beautiful concluding Psalm (150), of the Mozart "Solemn Vespers of a Confessor", it says "Laudate Dominum, omnes gentes" etc, and it would NEVER EVER EVER be translated as "Praise the Lord, all you *gentiles*". That's simply preposterous.

(He's an amateur. I think there's a diagnosable form of Autism Spectum Disease, where people try to appear as experts in a field they really don't know much about, or have much training in, (kind of like "he who must not be named" had)). It's called the Dunning -Kruger effect. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%...ger_effect
The attempted "superiority" picture here seems to fit.

Got ti,. Thanks!

As it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
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22-09-2013, 01:24 PM
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 01:10 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  In the KJV, and the Revised Standard Version it's Psalm 102, Verse 15, (not 16, like he said). In the NAV it's verse 16.
Anyone who knows Latin knows the word "gentes" is NOT "gentiles". It is always translated as "nations". "Omnes gentes" is always correctly translated as "all nations", or using the article, as "all the nations". All the versions in Latin use 'omnes gentes" so he purposely chose to give a "racist" ("divisional") spin/nuance to the psalm, which is actually completely absent in the actual piece of original literature.

Actually, literally it's "peoples". Nations works, but the boundaries are not politics but clans. Gentiles does not work whatsoever.

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Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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22-09-2013, 01:38 PM (This post was last modified: 22-09-2013 01:49 PM by Bucky Ball.)
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 01:24 PM)Dom Wrote:  
(22-09-2013 01:10 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  In the KJV, and the Revised Standard Version it's Psalm 102, Verse 15, (not 16, like he said). In the NAV it's verse 16.
Anyone who knows Latin knows the word "gentes" is NOT "gentiles". It is always translated as "nations". "Omnes gentes" is always correctly translated as "all nations", or using the article, as "all the nations". All the versions in Latin use 'omnes gentes" so he purposely chose to give a "racist" ("divisional") spin/nuance to the psalm, which is actually completely absent in the actual piece of original literature.

Actually, literally it's "peoples". Nations works, but the boundaries are not politics but clans. Gentiles does not work whatsoever.

That can be, but often "omnes gentes" is followed immediately by "omnes populi", so I always thought if they meant to say "peoples" they would say "populi". For some reason I seem to remember there's also a "masculine" nuance in "gentes" ... I'll have to look it up.

They should have kept going for ex's sake : "respexit in orationem humilium et non sprevit precem eorum,
scribantur haec in generationem alteram et populus qui creabitur laudabit Dominum"

Tongue

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Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
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22-09-2013, 02:06 PM
RE: Timebunt gentes nomen tuum Domine
(22-09-2013 01:38 PM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  ...
I seem to remember there's also a "masculine" nuance in "gentes" ... I'll have to look it up.
...

Don't bother. It's the catholics... of course only men get mentioned. Women stay silent.

Drinking Beverage

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