Timeline.
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14-05-2013, 10:36 AM (This post was last modified: 15-05-2013 10:08 AM by earmuffs.)
Timeline.
Because if we're going to have a history section we might as well have a huge timeline thread neatly arranged into different periods of time.
Seeming I'm bored as fuck I think I'll do it if you people don't mind, which I don't care if you do because I'm doing it anyway. So sue me.

I'm hoping people will be able to give me stuff to fill in any gaps I've missed of key events throughout history. Or correct me if I'm wrong.

It's constantly a work in progress.
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Pre-Earth (13.77 - 4.6 billion years ago) and Hadean Eon (4.6 - 4.0 billion years ago)

13.77 Billion Years Ago
- God Farted.
4.6 Billion Years Ago
- The Earth forms from dust grains from the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young Sun.
4.5 Billion Years Ago
- Theia collides with Earth sending large debris into earths orbit which later forms into the Moon.

Archean Eon (4.0 - 2.5 Billion years ago)

Eoarchaean Era
3.92 Billion Years Ago
- Late bombardment lasts for 70 million years
3.85 Billion Years Ago
- First evidence of life, Kerogen.
3.8 Billion Years Ago
- Oldest iron band formations. (Oxygen was being produced)

Paleoarchaean Era
3.6 Billion Years Ago
- Vaalbara supercontinent forms.
3.5 Billion Years Ago
- Cyanobacteria
- Stromatolites
3.3 Billion Years Ago
- Plate tectonics

Mesoarchaean Era
3.2 Billion Years Ago
- Mesoarchaean Era begins.
3.1 Billion Years Ago
- Break up of Vaalbara
3.0 Billion Years Ago
- Ur supercontinet forms.

Neoarchaean Era
2.8 Billion Years Ago
- Neoarchean Era begins.
2.7 Billion Years Ago
- Kenorland supercontinet begins to form.

Proterozoic Eon (2.5 Billion - 542 Million Years Ago)

Paleoproterozoic Era (2.5 - 1.6 Billion Years Ago)
Siderian Period
2.5 Billion Years Ago
- Start of the Proterozoic Eon, Paleoproterozoic Era and Siderian Period.
- Earths atmosphere begins to become more oxygenic
- Artica continent begins to form
2.4 Billion Years Ago
- Huronian glaciation begins.

Rhyacian Period
2.3 Billion Years Ago
- Rhyacian Period begins.
2.2 Billion Years Ago
- Oxygen 5-18% of current level.
2.1 Billion Years Ago
- Earliest multicellular organisms

Orosirian Period
2.05 Billion Years Ago
- Orosirian Period begins.
- Orogeny in most continents
2.023 Billion Years Ago
- Vredefort impact
2.0 Billion Years Ago
- Atlantcia supercontinent forms.
1.85 Billion Years Ago
- Sudbury impact

Statherian Period
1.8 Billion Years Ago
- Statherian Period begins.
- First sandseas appear.
- Columbia supercontinent forms.
Mesoproterozoic Era (1.6 - 1.0 Billion Years Ago)
Calmmian Period

Ectasian Period

Stenian Period
Neoproterozoic Era (1.0 Billion - 542 Million Years Ago)
Tonian Period

Cryogenian Period

Ediacaran Period

Phanerozoic Eon (542 Million Years Ago - Present)

Paleozoic Era (542 - 251 Million Years Ago)
Mesozoic Era (251 - 65 Million Years Ago)
Cenozoic Era (65 Million Years Ago - Present)

Special: Holocene Epoch (12,000 Years ago - Present)



Yes I am aware it's not even close to finished but give me a break, it's late.
I will fill in more gaps tomorrow.
Suggestions welcome. Sticky is also welcome Tongue

I don't talk gay, I don't walk gay, it's like people don't even know I'm gay unless I'm blowing them.
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14-05-2013, 10:42 AM
RE: Timeline.
(14-05-2013 10:36 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  So sue me.

I'll have the paperwork in a few days, expect to be served soon Big Grin


btw, it needs more cowbell (and links to wikipedia)

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14-05-2013, 10:45 AM
RE: Timeline.
That was the goal (wiki links, not cowbells???).

I don't talk gay, I don't walk gay, it's like people don't even know I'm gay unless I'm blowing them.
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14-05-2013, 10:45 AM
RE: Timeline.
I got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell.

Just visiting.

-SR
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14-05-2013, 10:57 AM
RE: Timeline.
Certainly interesting. What are you expecting people to post about for each of the aforementioned periods of time? I see them as something worthy of study but the details don't seem like much fodder for conversation.

Evolve
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14-05-2013, 12:43 PM (This post was last modified: 14-05-2013 02:24 PM by Phaedrus.)
RE: Timeline.
Paleozoic:

Cambrian:
The first appearance of vertical burrows marks the beginning of the Cambrian
The Cambrian Explosion (abundance of preserved shelly fossils) occurs
Trilobites, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, Crinoids, Arthropods, Sponges, very primitive fish all appear for the first time

Ordovician:
Diversification of sea life -- Corals, Bryozoans, and the first Molluscs appear. Brachiopods greatly diversify
First bony jawed fishes. Very earliest shark-like species evolve
First evidence of land plants and fungi
Ordovician-Silurian extinction occurs due to glaciation, cooling oceans, and falling sea levels
Many marine phyla, some of which had persisted since the Cambrian, are eradicated. 60% of all marine species die

Silurian:
Marine invertebrates recover from the extinction event
Diversification and spread of bony fish. Sharks become common
Land plants are firmly established, though primitive. Many are not vascular, and resemble moss
Arthropods become the first animals on land

Devonian:
Land plants diversify, giving rise to ferns, horse tails, and the earliest trees
Insects and arachnids first appear and begin to diversify
Ammonites evolve from more primitive cephalopods
The tetrapod family of fish evolves
(Late) Tiktaalik becomes the first tetrapod to walk on land
Late Devonian extinction occurs. Cause unknown
Many marine genera go extinct, including virtually all extant Rugose coral species and the majority of Trilobites

Carboniferous:
Widespread land plants, living in huge swamps and forests that eventually become coal beds in Europe, North America, and Asia
Club mosses, ferns, seed ferns, and horse tails dominate the landscape. Lepidodendrale trees reach heights of 30m (100ft)
Giant insects and other arthropods appear. Spiders, scorpions, ants, termites, and dragonflies are well established
Tetrapods diversify and give rise to amphibians, which become the dominant land animals
(Late) Early reptile-like amphibians evolve, with harder, more durable eggs
Fish diversify significantly

Permian:
As the climate dries, Lycopods are replaced with seed ferns and early Coniferous trees
Reptiles evolve and become a significant force on land
Reptiles diversify, resulting significantly in the Archosaurs, which would later become dinosaurs
Mammal-like reptiles evolve, such as Dimetrodon
Primitive turtles evolve
The Supercontinent Pangea begins to form. Climate turns from wet rainforests of the Carboniferous to desert
The Permian Extinction event kills 96% of all marine species, and many terrestrial species
Many marine animals go extinct, including the last trilobites and much of the brachiopod family, and many others




I'll do the mesozoic next.

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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14-05-2013, 12:56 PM (This post was last modified: 14-05-2013 02:47 PM by Phaedrus.)
RE: Timeline.
Mesozoic

Triassic:
Life starts to recover from the Permian Extinction. Climate stays fairly arid
The disappearance of Trilobites and many Brachiopods allows Crustaceans and Bivalve Molluscs (respectively) to take their place. Echinoderms recover and diversify, but Crinoids are extinct
Conifers such as Cycads and Ginkgos become more common, but ferns and similar plants dominate
Archosaur reptiles evolve into the first dinosaurs (notable species: Coelophysis, Plateosaurus)
First pterosaurs appear in the air. First ichthyosaurs (which are not dinosaurs) appear in the sea. Sharks diversify
Early tortoises and crocodiles become established
Mammal-like reptiles become more mammalian, giving birth to live young, and become smaller
Pangaea shows its first signs of breaking up near the end of the Triassic
Climate change causes the Triassic-Jurassic Extinction, killing many terrestrial and marine species and opening the doors for the domination of the dinosaurs

Jurassic:
The climate becomes more humid. The flora is dominated by Conifers and Ferns
Dinosaurs become the dominant land animals (notable species: Stegosaurus, Apatosaurus (aka Brontosaurus), Diplodocus, Allosaurus)
(late) Archeopteryx, the first bird-like dinosaur with feathers, evolves
Ichthyosaurs rule the sea, although with significant competition from sharks
The majority of Ammonite species go extinct at the end of the Jurassic
Pterosaurs diversify and become the dominant aerial species
Mammals exist as small, shrew-like animals living in trees and burrows in the ground

Cretaceous:
Pangaea begins to break apart, radically altering climate during this period. Major volcanic events occur
Major innovation occurs in the plant kingdom, including the evolution and spread of flowering plants, early Deciduous trees, and primitive grass
Dinosaurs begin to suffer, although many of the most impressive and famous species exist during this time (notable species: Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Velociraptor)
Ichthyosaurs are replaced by Plesiosaurs (which are not dinosaurs) as the dominant water species
Modern Scleractinian coral appears; the first time that coral is common since the Devonian
Modern sharks evolve, and compete with Plesiosaurs
Pterosaurs reach their largest size
Crocodiles assume a form similar to their modern shape
Bird-like dinosaurs become more common
A massive meteor strike in modern day Yucatan causes a major extinction event. Ichthyosaurs, Plesiosaurs, Pterosaurs, and non-Avian Dinosaurs all go extinct, as do the last Ammonites
The path is laid clear for Birds and Mammals to become dominant on land

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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14-05-2013, 12:59 PM
RE: Timeline.
(14-05-2013 12:43 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  Paleozoic:

Cambrian:
The Cambrian Explosion (abundance of preserved shelly fossils)
Trilobites, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, Crinoids, Sponges, very primitive fish

Ordovician:
Diversification of sea life -- Corals, Bryozoans, Molluscs
First bony jawed fishes
First evidence of land plants and fungi

Silurian:
Diversification and spread of bony fish
Firmly established land plants

Devonian:
Land plants diversify further. Insects appear
Ammonites evolve from more primitive cephalopods
Majority of trilobite species go extinct
The tetrapod family of fish evolves
(Late Devonian) Tiktaalik becomes the first tetrapod to walk on land

Carboniferous:
Widespread land plants, huge swamps that eventually become coal beds in Europe, North America, and Asia
Giant insects and other arthropods appear. Spiders, ants, termites, and dragonflies are well established
Amphibians evolve from tetrapods and become a dominant part of the ecosystem. Proto-reptiles that lay eggs on land begin to evolve

Permian:
Reptiles evolve and become a significant force on land
Reptiles diversify, resulting significantly in the Archosaurs and early mammal-like reptiles. Also turtles
The Supercontinent Pangea begins to form. Climate turns from wet rainforests of the Carboniferous to desert
The Permian Extinction event kills 95% of all animal species. Many marine species go extinct, including the last trilobites and much of the brachiopod family, and many others




I'll do the mesozoic next.

The end-Permian killed off ~96% of all marine species. I don't think the estimates are quite as high or even well known at all for non-marine or especially terrestrial species of plant or animal. Not as much has been done with their diversity.

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14-05-2013, 01:05 PM
RE: Timeline.
(14-05-2013 12:56 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  Mesozoic

Triassic:
Life starts to recover from the Permian Extinction. Climate stays fairly arid
Archosaur reptiles evolve into the first dinosaurs (notable species: Coelophysis, Plateosaurus)
First pterosaurs appear. First ichthyosaurs appear.
Early tortoises and crocodiles become established
Mammal-like reptiles become more mammalian, and smaller
Pangaea shows its first signs of breaking up near the end of the Triassic

Jurassic:
Dinosaurs become the dominant land animals (notable species: Stegosaurus, Apatosaurus (aka Brontosaurus), Diplodocus, Allosaurus)
(late) Archeopteryx, the first bird-like dinosaur with feathers, evolves
Ichthyosaurs rule the sea. Ammonites survive to the end of the period, then go extinct
Pterosaurs diversify and become the dominant aerial species
Mammals exist as small, shrew-like animals living in trees and burrows in the ground

Cretaceous:
Pangaea begins to break apart, radically altering climate during this period. Major volcanic events occur
Dinosaurs begin to suffer, although many of the most impressive and famous species exist during this time (notable species: Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Velociraptor)
Ichthyosaurs are replaced by Plesiosaurs as the dominant water species
Pterosaurs reach their largest size
Bird-like dinosaurs become more common
A massive meteor strike in modern day Yucatan causes a major extinction event. Dinosaurs, Ichthyosaurs, Plesiosaurs, and Pterosaurs all go extinct

Add mammal-like reptiles origin back in the Permian (like Dimetrodon)

Aridity is mainly a consequence of Pangea and not much moisture making it inland. The coasts wouldn't have been arid. So maybe, Pangea fully formed, creating a large arid environment across much of its landmass.(?)

Western interior seaway seems significant enough to thrown in there too.


The major orogenies could go in too? Acadian, Alleghenian, and Taconic for the Paleozoic of NA. I'm awful with the dates though. And I don't know much about the orogeneies of other continents, except the Himalayas uplifting about 45 million years ago. The Rocky Mountain orogenies go in the Cenozoic too.

And the ammonites go extinct along with the dinosaurs and marine reptiles (worth noting that pleisosaurs and icthyosaurs are not dinosaurs and are marine mammals?)

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14-05-2013, 01:15 PM
RE: Timeline.
I'd do the orogenies, but like you I'm only familiar with the North American ones, and it would seem Amero-centric to only include those. I think the biological developments will be what people are most interested in.

Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs were not dinosaurs, but they aren't mammals either. They were reptiles, 100%.

I'll add some more info on early mammal-like reptiles

I thought ammonites went extinct in the Jurassic, but I just checked and a few made it to the Cretaceous. I'll fix that

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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