Timeline.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
14-05-2013, 01:17 PM
RE: Timeline.
I can help with the Cenozoic as far as primates are concerned. The list is not meant to be comprehensive.

Cenozoic Era (65 million years ago - present)


Pleistocene (1.6 MYA - 10K) - First human ancestors and anatomically modern humans - Homo habilis, ergaster, erectus, antecessor, heidelbergensis, neanderthalensis, and sapiens
Pliocene (5.5-1.6 MYA) - First ape-like human ancestors and cousins - Ardipthecids and australopithecids (gracile and robust)
Miocene (25-5.5 MYA) - First apes - Proconsul, Morotopithecus, Sivapithecids, etc.
Oligocene (35-25 MYA) - First anthropoids - Parapithecids and Propliopithecids
Eocene (58-35 MYA) - First prosimians (first true primates) - Adapoids and Omomyoids
Paleocene (65-58 MYA) - Cousin/ancestor of primates - Plesiadapiformes
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like ghostexorcist's post
14-05-2013, 01:24 PM
RE: Timeline.
(14-05-2013 01:15 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  I'd do the orogenies, but like you I'm only familiar with the North American ones, and it would seem Amero-centric to only include those. I think the biological developments will be what people are most interested in.

Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs were not dinosaurs, but they aren't mammals either. They were reptiles, 100%.

I'll add some more info on early mammal-like reptiles

I thought ammonites went extinct in the Jurassic, but I just checked and a few made it to the Cretaceous. I'll fix that

Dimetrodon is a mammal-like reptile

Plesiosaurs and icthyosaurs are marine reptiles and not dinosaurs.

If I made an error in my first posts, I must have missed it.

Evolve
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-05-2013, 01:30 PM
RE: Timeline.
You called Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs "marine mammals" Tongue


How's it look now? Leaving out geophysical things for now, aside from general statements about Pangaea

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-05-2013, 01:32 PM
RE: Timeline.
(14-05-2013 01:30 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  You called Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs "marine mammals" Tongue


How's it look now? Leaving out geophysical things for now, aside from general statements about Pangaea

Goddamn chubby fingers not communicating with the brain. I know what I MEANT!!!!!!!!!!!

Evolve
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-05-2013, 02:02 PM
RE: Timeline.
Ok, I think I've got good enough detail for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. Someone want to proof read them?

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-05-2013, 02:16 PM
RE: Timeline.
(14-05-2013 12:43 PM)Phaedrus Wrote:  Paleozoic:

Cambrian:
The Cambrian Explosion (abundance of preserved shelly fossils) occurs
Trilobites, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, Crinoids, Arthropods, Sponges, very primitive fish all appear for the first time

Ordovician:
Diversification of sea life -- Corals, Bryozoans, Molluscs
First bony jawed fishes. Very earliest shark-like species evolve
First evidence of land plants and fungi
Ordovician-Silurian extinction occurs due to glaciation, cooling oceans, and falling sea levels
Many marine phyla, some of which had persisted since the Cambrian, are eradicated. 60% of all marine species die

Silurian:
Marine invertebrates recover from the extinction event
Diversification and spread of bony fish. Sharks become common
Land plants are firmly established, though primitive. Many are not vascular, and resemble moss
Arthropods become the first animals on land

Devonian:
Land plants diversify, giving rise to ferns, horse tails, and the earliest trees
Insects and arachnids first appear and begin to diversify
Ammonites evolve from more primitive cephalopods
The tetrapod family of fish evolves
(Late) Tiktaalik becomes the first tetrapod to walk on land
Late Devonian extinction occurs. Cause unknown
Many marine genera go extinct, including virtually all extant coral species and the majority of Trilobites

Carboniferous:
Widespread land plants, living in huge swamps and forests that eventually become coal beds in Europe, North America, and Asia
Club mosses, ferns, seed ferns, and horse tails dominate the landscape. Lepidodendrale trees reach heights of 30m (100ft)
Giant insects and other arthropods appear. Spiders, scorpions, ants, termites, and dragonflies are well established
Tetrapods diversify and give rise to amphibians, which become the dominant land animals
(Late) Early reptile-like amphibians evolve, with harder, more durable eggs
Fish diversify significantly

Permian:
As the climate dries, Lycopods are replaced with seed ferns and early Coniferous trees
Reptiles evolve and become a significant force on land
Reptiles diversify, resulting significantly in the Archosaurs, which would later become dinosaurs
Mammal-like reptiles evolve, such as Dimetrodon
Primitive turtles evolve
The Supercontinent Pangea begins to form. Climate turns from wet rainforests of the Carboniferous to desert
The Permian Extinction event kills 96% of all marine species, and many terrestrial species
Many marine animals go extinct, including the last trilobites and much of the brachiopod family, and many others




I'll do the mesozoic next.

For the Cambrian, add in the first appearance of vertical burrows marks the beginning of the Cambrian

Radiation during the Ordovician is less important for molluscs and more important for brachiopods.

End-Devonian mass extinction is believed to be due to widespread anoxia and climate change. Trigger is unknown and debate exists on whether it was a cooling or warming of climates.

Highlight that the Perm-Tr extinction is the end of all trilobites, severely cripples the brachiopods, bryozoans, and the end of all rugose corals.

That is all I have for the highlights of the Paleozoic in the way of bullet points to add or amend.

Meso

Rudist bivalves were reef builders for a brief time. Very interesting at least

I don't know as much about the vertebrates here, but the emphasis should be added on molluscan evolution too. Bivalves radiated after the brachs are wiped out at the P-Tr. This becomes important once we enter the Cenozoic and they radiate further.

On top of that, the extinction of the Paleozoic corals opens up the niche for Scleractinian corals, the absence of trilobites opens up the niche for crustaceans, echinoderms recover but not as crinoids.

That is the Mesozoic Marine Revolution.

Evolve
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-05-2013, 09:13 AM
RE: Timeline.
I think the timeline from the OP should be updated with the material posted so far.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-05-2013, 09:19 AM
RE: Timeline.
Nah, that'll never happen.

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: