To whom do you keep returning?
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03-03-2014, 09:50 AM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
(03-03-2014 09:13 AM)morondog Wrote:  Oh, forgot, Tom Holland is another favourite. Reread him any day.

Checked him out. Apparently he did this (Dinosaurs, Myths and Monsters) which I might actually check out once I've managed to crawl underneath the pile of work I willingly brought upon myself. Dodgy

Quote:Vera, JD... I dunno. The article you linked to seemed more like a diatribe than anything else. Bloody academics. I've met enough of them that I'm not gonna take some prof's nose being out of joint as anything to worry about. The only book I've read of his is "Guns, Germs and Steel" and I found it incredibly interesting, and did not pick up any racist overtones. Also the comments section of the article you linked to has a lot of stuff along the same lines... Angel

Then you must be one of 'em "bourgeois intellectuals, who have grown tired of looking meanspirited and self-serving when they make their transparently desperate efforts to displace histories of imperialism back on its victims. They need a pseudointellectual explanation for inequality in order to sustain the bourgeois social order that guarantees their privilege. This they found in Guns, Germs and Steel." Tongue

Seriously, though. The article is extremely diatribic so even if he does have a point it's hard to take him seriously, indeed (but I guess it's easier in disciplines such as this, where there really isn't "correct" and "incorrect". It's not like anyone can accuse Euler of discrimination and not being politically correct, for calling e irrational ;-))

(But yeah, scientists sure know how to have at each other. Someone sent me a link once (haven't watched it yet) on feuds in science and there were even people who committed suicide. (Same goes for talent and the arts, too - came across an otherwise pathetically hilarious collection of gibes of composers aimed at other composers (there were even remarks about looks and weight!). But am still reeling from Tchaikovsky's comment that Handel's music was 4th-rate. I mean, if it were Beethoven saying it, in his older (and deafer) years, but... 4th-rate! No )

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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05-03-2014, 12:14 PM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
Ray Bradbury, William Faulkner, Shakespeare, Nietzsche -- just because I like the way they write.

Also, Tom Apostol. One of my missions in life is to finish working my way through "Calculus, Volume I" before I die. I tried in 1980/81, again in 1987, and again in 2002 (got as far as the end of Chapter 6). Trying again this year. Call me a geek.
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13-03-2014, 10:47 PM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
Franz Kafka and Edgar Allan Poe.

Why? I'm just dark and introspective and creepy that way. Big Grin
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14-03-2014, 11:48 AM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
*reads thread title*

Your mom. Drinking Beverage

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14-03-2014, 11:50 AM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
(21-02-2014 08:42 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  Jane Austen.

I'm such a girl.

Awesome. I was gonna reply, but I really don't have a need. Big Grin

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15-03-2014, 07:34 PM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
No matter how many times I've read the classics (Hemingway, Steinbeck etc) those are the ones I return to. But, right now, I've been on a Stephen King phase. He's a brilliant writer and no two stories are alike. Smile

The beauty of the heart, is the lasting beauty. - Rumi Heart
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15-03-2014, 10:12 PM (This post was last modified: 16-03-2014 08:45 AM by WindyCityJazz.)
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
Alexandre Dumas is one I keep coming back to. He does a great job of writing 'everything' books, and by that I mean that his books always have a good amount of everything in them: mystery, romance, adventure, comedy, etc. The best thing is that it's all so well-balanced. It's not like books that are 90% romance and 10% mystery. He balances all of them so well. The Count of Monte Cristo is still my all-time favorite book. I've read the unabridged version 3 times now.

“Religion was invented when the first con man met the first fool.” - Mark Twain
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16-03-2014, 05:36 AM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
(13-03-2014 10:47 PM)WhiteRaven Wrote:  Franz Kafka and Edgar Allan Poe.

Why? I'm just dark and introspective and creepy that way. Big Grin

Kafka is awesome.
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16-03-2014, 05:41 AM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
(21-02-2014 08:42 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  Jane Austen.

I'm such a girl.

Edited to add the why...since being a girl might not be enough.

I always feel differently about the story after I finish it. Sometimes I really hate Mr Darcy; other times I love him. Sometimes I just get lost in the imagery of her words.


This ^. Pure and simply THIS ^

When I want your opinion I'll read your entrails.
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16-03-2014, 10:07 AM
RE: To whom do you keep returning?
(15-03-2014 10:12 PM)WindyCityJazz Wrote:  Alexandre Dumas is one I keep coming back to. The Count of Monte Cristo is still my all-time favorite book. I've read the unabridged version 3 times now.

I've reread the Count of Monte Cristo quite a few times. However. After having read The Three Musketeers more times than I can count as a kid, I reread them as an adult and was... well, I think shocked would be the mot juste. I found all the "good guys" abhorrent and vile. Esp. Athos (on whom I had the hugest crush... always did have a thing for tortured heroes Rolleyes ), who HANG the woman who he supposedly loved more than his life... only because she'd stolen something. I mean, WTF. And that's just one instance. Of MANY. I don't think I'm ever rereading this book.

Still, Dumas père was awesome and led quite the life... his fils, however, was mostly a sanctimonious, religious little... um... yeah.

And speaking of crappy relatives, the elder Bronte sisters deserve to be detested not only for some of the most atrocious, almost misogynistic "romance" novels, but even more so for what they did to their arguably more talented and certainly way more progressive sister Anne: "Charlotte Brontë was disturbed by The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and made no secret of her distaste for the book. Thus, in September 1850, in her influential position as one of the most lionized writers of her time, Charlotte Brontë helped to quell interest in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by publicly condemning it. Privately, during the same month, she sealed the fate of Anne's second novel by declining Smith, Elder's offer to issue a reprint edition, saying, "Wildfell Hall it hardly appears to me desireable to preserve."

Anne also appears to have had religious doubts, expressed in some of her poems (she even dedicated one to my favourite tortured Calvinist poet, Cowper):

"ETERNAL Power, of earth and air!
Unseen, yet seen in all around,
Remote, but dwelling everywhere,
Though silent, heard in every sound.

If e'er thine ear in mercy bent,
When wretched mortals cried to Thee,
And if, indeed, Thy Son was sent,
To save lost sinners such as me:

Then hear me now, while, kneeling here,
I lift to thee my heart and eye,
And all my soul ascends in prayer,
Oh, give me–give me Faith! I cry.

Without some glimmering in my heart,
I could not raise this fervent prayer;
But, oh! a stronger light impart,
And in Thy mercy fix it there.

While Faith is with me, I am blest;
It turns my darkest night to day;
But while I clasp it to my breast,
I often feel it slide away.


Then, cold and dark, my spirit sinks,
To see my light of life depart;
And every fiend of Hell, methinks,
Enjoys the anguish of my heart.

What shall I do, if all my love,
My hopes, my toil, are cast away,
And if there be no God above,
To hear and bless me when I pray?


If this be vain delusion all,
If death be an eternal sleep,

And none can hear my secret call,
Or see the silent tears I weep!

Oh, help me, God! For thou alone
Canst my distracted soul relieve;
Forsake it not: it is thine own,
Though weak, yet longing to believe.

Oh, drive these cruel doubts away;
And make me know, that Thou art God!
A faith, that shines by night and day,
Will lighten every earthly load.

If I believe that Jesus died,
And, waking, rose to reign above;
Then surely Sorrow, Sin, and Pride,
Must yield to Peace, and Hope, and Love.

And all the blessed words He said
Will strength and holy joy impart:
A shield of safety o'er my head,
A spring of comfort in my heart."

God, years after I went through this very thing (and lived to not see the delusional light ;-)) it still hurts reading about others going through it. Esp. others living in a much darker time than ours. Religion has to answer not only for crippling humankind and stifling its progress as a whole, but also for bringing such unimaginable pain and anguish, and self-hate in the lives of millions. And usually - the most sensitive and intelligent ones, too. Sad

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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