Top of the heap.
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13-06-2013, 09:49 AM
RE: Top of the heap.
(13-06-2013 09:41 AM)Chas Wrote:  
(13-06-2013 09:36 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  For instance, being able to speak and write doesn't necessarily mean one is intelligent. Some researchers believe that dolphins may be our intellectual superior.

The dolphins think that it's obvious.

I have to admit, if given the choice between being human or a dolphin, I'd most likely choose dolphin. Yes

But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.

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13-06-2013, 09:50 AM
RE: Top of the heap.
(13-06-2013 09:45 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  I could have sworn that I've read or seen that the development of our modern brains happened very quickly. Perhaps in evolutionary terms it wasn't all that quicker than normal and I just misunderstood it as being more extraordinary than it actually was.

Our brains grew by 1000 cc in 2 million years. I'm not sure what the figures are for other animals, though.
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13-06-2013, 09:51 AM
RE: Top of the heap.
(13-06-2013 09:49 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  I have to admit, if given the choice between being human or a dolphin, I'd most likely choose dolphin. Yes

Me too. They get all sorts of tail.
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13-06-2013, 09:52 AM
RE: Top of the heap.
(13-06-2013 09:45 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(13-06-2013 12:39 AM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  I can't say that we did it any faster than other species -- we might have been better equipped to handle the changes.

I could have sworn that I've read or seen that the development of our modern brains happened very quickly. Perhaps in evolutionary terms it wasn't all that quicker than normal and I just misunderstood it as being more extraordinary than it actually was.

***WARNING! Slight oversimplification to follow! WARNING!***

Yes, it was rapid in evolutionary time. We diverged from our common ancestor with the chimpanzee about 6 MYA. Evidence of superior intelligence starts to appear less than 2 MYA, and 'modern' intelligence only 200,000 years ago (or so).

So the differences with chimps took about 4 million years to develop, and another 1.8 million to really take off.

And it is really only in the last 10,000 years that the exponential growth noticeably started, and only the last 400 years that the tool of science enabled true knowledge creation.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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13-06-2013, 10:12 AM (This post was last modified: 13-06-2013 10:26 AM by Momsurroundedbyboys.)
RE: Top of the heap.
(13-06-2013 09:45 AM)evenheathen Wrote:  
(13-06-2013 12:39 AM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  I can't say that we did it any faster than other species -- we might have been better equipped to handle the changes.

I could have sworn that I've read or seen that the development of our modern brains happened very quickly. Perhaps in evolutionary terms it wasn't all that quicker than normal and I just misunderstood it as being more extraordinary than it actually was.

I think when they say "quickly" they're talking geologic terms not in quickly as in running to the store or even one or three generations -- in geologic terms a 1.5 million years is a short amount of time. Because our bodies had to change and adapt too -- especially the females. I think I remember reading that we have fossils of some pre homo sapiens and it seemed to me and bare with me I suck at the metric system but I believe with each fossil group there was a increase of around 300cc I think there must have been a lot of things that contributed. As we developed socially, with probably more symbolic language or something like that and greater ability to forage and hunt...the brain size slowly increased...

Here's something I'm not entirely sure about but I seem to recall that Neanderthals had larger brains but weren't really smarter. Shit...now I gotta go off to google.

sigh.

Edited to add: Found this that's kinda interesting at least to me...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of..._evolution

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26-06-2013, 06:00 PM
RE: Top of the heap.
This paper has bearing on this discussion.

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/c...l.pdf+html
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