Traditional Christmas dinner.
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05-12-2015, 03:34 PM
Traditional Christmas dinner.
So since Anjele started a thread about finding a nice ham it struck me that I know next to nothing about traditional Christmas dinner around the world. So would you like to share yours?

Here in Denmark it seem there is two main traditions which sometimes get mixed.

Usually it's either duck or pork roast with crackling. And I think it's becoming more normal to have both. Some even add something we call medister which I have no idea how to translate. but it's a kind of pork sausage that has been cooked and the fried on a pan. (Wiki say: The word is derived from a combination of met and ister, which respectively means pork and suet. It was first used in a Swedish housekeeping book from the early 16th century)

Usually both duck and the pork roast is served with two types of potatoes (Cooked and caramelized), Sweet and sour red cabbage and a thick (yuck, i prefer mine think and runny) gravy/sauce.

Dessert is ris à l'amande in which one whole almond is hidden. Who every get the whole almond gets an extra gift.


I guess there is many different way to do it within Denmark too But I think this is regarded as the most common Christmas dinner now.

Bonus info:
We celebrate all of Christmas on December 24th. so after dinner and usually a bit of a rest we dance around the Christmas tree and sing Christmas songs (Naturally of Christian origin) after which we unpack our presents.
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05-12-2015, 03:55 PM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
It's usually lunch and not dinner here in Greece.
Every home has its traditions and there's no specific "menu" for Christmas, but some things are more common than others.

It's usually gonna be something like pork stew with plums or stuffed turkey, roast potatoes, potato salad, chicken soup for a starter and all kinds of Greek side dishes (tzatziki, feta, roast peppers, pickled stuff).

Dessert will be some kind of cake with syrup or Greek Christmas cookies, one kind of which is called melomakarona and tastes like heaven. They're made with olive oil, walnuts, orange juice, clove and cinnamon and then drenched in a honey syrup. They're the best thing ever.

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05-12-2015, 04:12 PM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
I am in the Dominican Republic although it is not my home country. Here starting last week there are cooked dead pigs for sale on the side of the road all over. Stop by and they'll slice off whatever amount you want and weigh it out to you. Don't know how that connects precisely with Xmas dinner, but is what I have been seeing this week and last. I don't find it edible. Very tuff and not chewable, but greasy enuff to slide down without chewing it at all.
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05-12-2015, 04:29 PM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
My family always celebrates and has dinner on Christmas Eve. My mom is a gourmet cook (which most people are shocked to find out since I cook like shit Hobo ). Since my family lives near the ocean, my mom uses a lot of seafood. We also have a lot of people over that's why there is so much food listed here. She makes:

Appetizers:
Stuffed mushrooms
Stuffed quahogs
Fruit salad with sorbet
Assorted fresh nuts for cracking
Expensive chocolate drops in a pretty wrapper on everyone's plate before dinner
Some kind of homemade dip with pumpernickel loaf
shrimp with cocktail sauce
steamers with melted butter
pecan rolls
popovers
bruschetta
salad

Dinner:
lobster
steak
baked stuffed haddock
roasted potatoes
peas and mushrooms
some kind of chutney

Dessert:
Ice cream sundaes with just about any topping you can think of marshmallow sauce, hot fudge, caramel sauce, cherries, nuts, jimmies...
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05-12-2015, 04:55 PM (This post was last modified: 05-12-2015 04:59 PM by bemore.)
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
Here in the UK it is traditional to have either chicken, beef or turkey. Normally served with Mashed and/or roasted potatoes, carrots, peas, swede, turnips, pigs in blankets (sausage with bacon wrapped around) and brussel sprouts.

Served with gravy, bread sauce, mint sauce and cranberry sauce/jelly.

Its just a jazzed up version of the traditional Sunday dinner, with a few tweaks and more annoying relations.

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05-12-2015, 05:17 PM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
1) Beer!

2) Blueberry glazed ribs!
Mac -n- cheese, Swiss chard & leek gratin, and mushroom & pine nut stuffing
muffins!
Paired with Cain Cuvee NV8, and Great Dane Cabernet

3) Salted caramel pie!
Paired with Alvear 1927 Pedro Ximinez

Shy

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05-12-2015, 07:56 PM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
(05-12-2015 03:34 PM)Nishi Karano Kaze Wrote:  So since Anjele started a thread about finding a nice ham it struck me that I know next to nothing about traditional Christmas dinner around the world. So would you like to share yours?

Here in Denmark it seem there is two main traditions which sometimes get mixed.

Usually it's either duck or pork roast with crackling. And I think it's becoming more normal to have both. Some even add something we call medister which I have no idea how to translate. but it's a kind of pork sausage that has been cooked and the fried on a pan. (Wiki say: The word is derived from a combination of met and ister, which respectively means pork and suet. It was first used in a Swedish housekeeping book from the early 16th century)

Usually both duck and the pork roast is served with two types of potatoes (Cooked and caramelized), Sweet and sour red cabbage and a thick (yuck, i prefer mine think and runny) gravy/sauce.

Dessert is ris à l'amande in which one whole almond is hidden. Who every get the whole almond gets an extra gift.


I guess there is many different way to do it within Denmark too But I think this is regarded as the most common Christmas dinner now.

Bonus info:
We celebrate all of Christmas on December 24th. so after dinner and usually a bit of a rest we dance around the Christmas tree and sing Christmas songs (Naturally of Christian origin) after which we unpack our presents.

mmm... porkducken.....

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06-12-2015, 10:30 AM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
[Image: Roast%20Beef%20And%20Yorkshire%20Pudding...6X580.Jpeg]

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06-12-2015, 10:31 AM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
(06-12-2015 10:30 AM)Chas Wrote:  [Image: Roast%20Beef%20And%20Yorkshire%20Pudding...6X580.Jpeg]

That looks wonderful!

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06-12-2015, 10:39 AM
RE: Traditional Christmas dinner.
(06-12-2015 10:31 AM)Anjele Wrote:  
(06-12-2015 10:30 AM)Chas Wrote:  [Image: Roast%20Beef%20And%20Yorkshire%20Pudding...6X580.Jpeg]

That looks wonderful!

It is! Drooling That's why we do it every year. Yes

Also, potatoes cooked with the roast.

[Image: 20111102-ultra-crispy-roast-potatoes-5.jpg]


OK, I'm going to take pictures of Christmas dinner this year and post them. Smile

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