Trans women not 'real women'
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10-03-2017, 04:11 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(10-03-2017 04:05 PM)Alla Wrote:  what does it mean "to feel like a woman?

Look, I feel like a woman now. But....

[Image: Mick-Jagger-You-Cant-Always-Get-What-You...on-Gif.gif]

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10-03-2017, 04:14 PM (This post was last modified: 10-03-2017 04:41 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(10-03-2017 02:26 PM)Alla Wrote:  Hmm.
Someone who has a womb is a woman.
Someone who has problems with a womb is a woman,
Someone who has removed womb is a woman.
Someone who can give birth to children is a woman.
Someone who can't give birth to children because of some health issues is a woman.

I think I covered everything.

You forgot make love to a crocodile and shake hands with the devil, make him crawl in the sand.




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10-03-2017, 04:15 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
I learn more about GM everyday. Consider

Wink

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
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10-03-2017, 04:21 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
If a body with female parts is found I will say "it is dead woman".
Can I say this?
Or should I only say from now on:" it is dead person"?

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10-03-2017, 04:22 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(10-03-2017 04:05 PM)Alla Wrote:  
jennybee Wrote:... womanhood is more than just sex organs, it is a natural state of mind--how you identify yourself.

Since I was a child I knew that I was a girl. It was not because of some kind of state of mind. I looked like a girl, I sounded like a girl, I had female first name. Strangers would call me "a girl". I liked to play with dolls, but I liked to do and I did things boys like to do.

What I want to understand is this: when someone is born with male body parts and something went wrong in the body (RS76 explained) what does it mean "to have woman state of mind"? to feel like a woman?

It means that you have a deep distress at having a body that doesn't match the internal self-image. This distress is called gender dysphoria. It's nearly impossible to put sufficiently into words for someone to really understand this feeling of dysphoria (god knows I and many others have tried). For many of us- to simply be perceived as a woman by others is sufficient to control the dysphoria. For many others, it's important to more fully or partially conform the body whether others see or not. For example- I am on hormone therapy. This treatment both alters my body (in many ways, too- I've got softer skin, lost muscle mass, body and facial fat redistribution, and breast growth... even orgasms feel more like what other women describe as their experience, and more) and my mind (I'm more emotionally agile, feel a deeper connection to my body and my life, feel more peaceful, the dysphoria is much much lessened, etc.). The changes I've experienced in transition are deep and permanent.

I know what it feels like to live as a man, though I always felt divorced from the mental state that so many men seemed to have. I tried so hard to meet the masculine standards of strength and toughness, yadda yadda, but it all felt so fake with me. Ugh. That only makes the dysphoria feel worse.

Untreated dysphoria leads to depression. I lived for a long time in my life as depressed, but unable to recognize it. I just assumed everyone felt that to one degree or another. It wasn't until I was about 30 that I finally learned that it was not normal and that it is treatable. My depression is under control, now. My dysphoria is under control now. I feel like my life is much more under control as well.

There is so much more to be said about it, but I don't have the time and I'm already neglecting work by taking the time to post this, so I apologize if it is an insufficient explanation. Undecided
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10-03-2017, 04:25 PM (This post was last modified: 10-03-2017 04:46 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(09-03-2017 03:10 PM)Emma Wrote:  On the subject of chromosomes- I wonder what you all think about this article.

I think the platypus is one fucked up Rube Goldberg genetics shit is what I think. Nature may be a cruel heartless bitch but at least she has a sense of humor.

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10-03-2017, 04:25 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(10-03-2017 04:22 PM)Emma Wrote:  
(10-03-2017 04:05 PM)Alla Wrote:  Since I was a child I knew that I was a girl. It was not because of some kind of state of mind. I looked like a girl, I sounded like a girl, I had female first name. Strangers would call me "a girl". I liked to play with dolls, but I liked to do and I did things boys like to do.

What I want to understand is this: when someone is born with male body parts and something went wrong in the body (RS76 explained) what does it mean "to have woman state of mind"? to feel like a woman?

It means that you have a deep distress at having a body that doesn't match the internal self-image. This distress is called gender dysphoria. It's nearly impossible to put sufficiently into words for someone to really understand this feeling of dysphoria (god knows I and many others have tried). For many of us- to simply be perceived as a woman by others is sufficient to control the dysphoria. For many others, it's important to more fully or partially conform the body whether others see or not. For example- I am on hormone therapy. This treatment both alters my body (in many ways, too- I've got softer skin, lost muscle mass, body and facial fat redistribution, and breast growth... even orgasms feel more like what other women describe as their experience, and more) and my mind (I'm more emotionally agile, feel a deeper connection to my body and my life, feel more peaceful, the dysphoria is much much lessened, etc.). The changes I've experienced in transition are deep and permanent.

I know what it feels like to live as a man, though I always felt divorced from the mental state that so many men seemed to have. I tried so hard to meet the masculine standards of strength and toughness, yadda yadda, but it all felt so fake with me. Ugh. That only makes the dysphoria feel worse.

Untreated dysphoria leads to depression. I lived for a long time in my life as depressed, but unable to recognize it. I just assumed everyone felt that to one degree or another. It wasn't until I was about 30 that I finally learned that it was not normal and that it is treatable. My depression is under control, now. My dysphoria is under control now. I feel like my life is much more under control as well.

There is so much more to be said about it, but I don't have the time and I'm already neglecting work by taking the time to post this, so I apologize if it is an insufficient explanation. Undecided

I have to leave now, but I will read your post. I believe that only you on this forum can answer my questions.
I love you, Heart Emma Heart

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10-03-2017, 04:31 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(09-03-2017 11:37 PM)Alla Wrote:  I am not sure what "real woman" is but I will tell you what I believe "woman" is. Woman is someone who has a womb and who has potential to give birth to children.

No technical reason men can't give birth. "The question is not 'Can a man do it?'" stated bioethicist Glenn McGee. "It’s ’If a man does have a successful pregnancy, can he survive it?’"

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10-03-2017, 04:36 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(10-03-2017 04:25 PM)Alla Wrote:  
(10-03-2017 04:22 PM)Emma Wrote:  It means that you have a deep distress at having a body that doesn't match the internal self-image. This distress is called gender dysphoria. It's nearly impossible to put sufficiently into words for someone to really understand this feeling of dysphoria (god knows I and many others have tried). For many of us- to simply be perceived as a woman by others is sufficient to control the dysphoria. For many others, it's important to more fully or partially conform the body whether others see or not. For example- I am on hormone therapy. This treatment both alters my body (in many ways, too- I've got softer skin, lost muscle mass, body and facial fat redistribution, and breast growth... even orgasms feel more like what other women describe as their experience, and more) and my mind (I'm more emotionally agile, feel a deeper connection to my body and my life, feel more peaceful, the dysphoria is much much lessened, etc.). The changes I've experienced in transition are deep and permanent.

I know what it feels like to live as a man, though I always felt divorced from the mental state that so many men seemed to have. I tried so hard to meet the masculine standards of strength and toughness, yadda yadda, but it all felt so fake with me. Ugh. That only makes the dysphoria feel worse.

Untreated dysphoria leads to depression. I lived for a long time in my life as depressed, but unable to recognize it. I just assumed everyone felt that to one degree or another. It wasn't until I was about 30 that I finally learned that it was not normal and that it is treatable. My depression is under control, now. My dysphoria is under control now. I feel like my life is much more under control as well.

There is so much more to be said about it, but I don't have the time and I'm already neglecting work by taking the time to post this, so I apologize if it is an insufficient explanation. Undecided

I have to leave now, but I will read your post. I believe that only you on this forum can answer my questions.
I love you, Heart Emma Heart

Awww, love you to my friend Smile I will check back tomorrow because I have to go, too.

Regarding your dead person question- I would say that's up to you. Someone only able to see surface-level would ought to be forgiven for misspeaking if they come to find out that the body they described as a woman actually belonged to a trans man or non-binary person. /shrug. It's not a bad thing to go the route of not assuming gender if you don't have to. But if you have to assume, you have to go by the information in front of you- which is just a physical body that looks like a woman.

That's just my opinion on that specific question.

I also think that RocketSurgeon and Jennybee and Mathilda and the others have done a great job explaining things. Smile
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10-03-2017, 05:47 PM
RE: Trans women not 'real women'
(10-03-2017 04:05 PM)Alla Wrote:  Since I was a child I knew that I was a girl. It was not because of some kind of state of mind. I looked like a girl, I sounded like a girl, I had female first name. Strangers would call me "a girl". I liked to play with dolls, but I liked to do and I did things boys like to do.

It is fairly common for the general public think that females should be a certain way and males should be another way. People generalize because it's easier than seeing people as individuals. Many say, for example: "Only girls play with dolls and only boys play with toy trains." We know that this can't be entirely true when there are obviously boys who like to play with dolls and girls who like to play with trains. Many generalizations might not be true at all, especially in light of how each individual sees their self inside their own mind.

So Alla, as a little girl, you had the notion (inside your mind) that you were a girl, even though you also liked to do some things, which you and others considered to be "boy things".
How we consider ourselves to be inside our own minds (state of mind) can often be different than what others see us to be on the outside.

If we see ourselves inside our minds to be a certain way, and that way doesn't quite match up with what others see of us on our exterior (either in behavior or physical appearance), that can cause incredible stress.

As Emma explains ...
(10-03-2017 04:22 PM)Emma Wrote:  It means that you have a deep distress at having a body that doesn't match the internal self-image. This distress is called gender dysphoria. It's nearly impossible to put sufficiently into words for someone to really understand this feeling of dysphoria (god knows I and many others have tried). For many of us- to simply be perceived as a woman by others is sufficient to control the dysphoria. For many others, it's important to more fully or partially conform the body whether others see or not. For example- I am on hormone therapy. This treatment both alters my body (in many ways, too- I've got softer skin, lost muscle mass, body and facial fat redistribution, and breast growth... even orgasms feel more like what other women describe as their experience, and more) and my mind (I'm more emotionally agile, feel a deeper connection to my body and my life, feel more peaceful, the dysphoria is much much lessened, etc.). The changes I've experienced in transition are deep and permanent.

I know what it feels like to live as a man, though I always felt divorced from the mental state that so many men seemed to have. I tried so hard to meet the masculine standards of strength and toughness, yadda yadda, but it all felt so fake with me. Ugh. That only makes the dysphoria feel worse.

Untreated dysphoria leads to depression. I lived for a long time in my life as depressed, but unable to recognize it. I just assumed everyone felt that to one degree or another. It wasn't until I was about 30 that I finally learned that it was not normal and that it is treatable. My depression is under control, now. My dysphoria is under control now. I feel like my life is much more under control as well.


All too often, people are teased or ridiculed for being how their mind tells them to be.

I think as a collective society, we're only just now learning that many prior generalizations we've had about "what boys are" or "what girls are" were simply not completely true. We're only just now realizing we have a lot of growing up to do. Shy

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels. ~ Albert Einstein
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