Travel
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22-04-2015, 01:43 PM
RE: Travel
I'd love to see everything as long as I don't have to fly lol
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05-05-2015, 08:27 AM
RE: Travel
I really like the fact that this Forum is multinational. I came across this piece today and thought it was pretty accurate concerning us ‘Merikans.

For instance we wanted to take my MIL to Canada only to find her passport had expired twenty years before (she never did get it). We love to travel and have found that we’re usually on boats full of Aussies, Germans, Japanese and Brits and very few Americans. Huh

Why Don’t Americans travel?
http://thehungrypartier.com/why-dont-ame...7-reasons/

1. 65% of Americans don’t have a passport
2. America has everything! .. Right?
3. Ignorance
4. Fear
5. Lack of Languages
6. Too Expensive…
7. No Gap Year

Here’s my short list on why I think everyone should travel.

1. Discover that there is more than one way to do things
2. You learn that your national priorities aren’t everyone else’s
3. Ego check
4. Food can be more than sustenance
5. Realize that we are completely different and yet exactly alike
6. Languages are to be embraced and not feared
7. Empathy

So what have you learned from traveling to other countries?

Thoughts and comments welcome...except from those dirty Kiwis Wink

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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05-05-2015, 09:01 AM
RE: Travel
I had a passport, got stamps for one trip in it, from 15 years ago. Its now expired and I don't see the point in renewing it since I cant afford to go anywhere that would need it.

Do I need them for a cruise out of FL? I think my drivers license is enough but I am not certain.

that would be the extent of travel in my near future.

#6 on that list is why most people don't bother with #1


"Life is a daring adventure or it is nothing"--Helen Keller
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05-05-2015, 09:45 AM
RE: Travel
(05-05-2015 08:27 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  So what have you learned from traveling to other countries?

I've learned that not everyone views their experiences in the same way while traveling.

In China, for example, I met a British guy who had been there for over 10 years and couldn't even ask "How much does that cost?" in Chinese. We also met this old German guy who'd been there so long his Chinese was indistinguishable from a person born in China, but his German had deteriorated to the point that a German friend of ours couldn't hold a conversation with him. We theorized that he might actually be a Cuban refugee. In the U.S., I also knew a guy in NY Chinatown who had been in the U.S. for over 20 years and still didn't speak English.

I and a good friend of mine whom I was sharing a room with, on the other hand, made a point to get out a bit more, and not just to the touristy spots that cater to foreigners. We were both holding basic conversations in Chinese within a matter of months, and left China a few years later nearly fluent in Chinese.

I was also stationed in Japan for two years. There were people I was stationed with who literally didn't leave the base the entire time we were there. I couldn't even get them to go to the Japanese McDonald's a five minute walk off base. Forget getting them to take a couple days off and head to Tokyo or the Aomori ice festival. Those of us who liked to get out referred to them as barracks rats.

I've enjoyed all the traveling I've done, but I also must admit that I've still managed to become even more of the cliché 'Murican in many ways regardless. I loved living abroad, but I always missed my guns Tongue

Hey in less than a year I'll have both a U.S. and Canadian passport.

'Murican Canadian
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05-05-2015, 09:49 AM
RE: Travel
(05-05-2015 09:45 AM)yakherder Wrote:  
(05-05-2015 08:27 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  So what have you learned from traveling to other countries?

I've learned that not everyone views their experiences in the same way while traveling.

In China, for example, I met a British guy who had been there for over 10 years and couldn't even ask "How much does that cost?" in Chinese. We also met this old German guy who'd been there so long his Chinese was indistinguishable from a person born in China, but his German had deteriorated to the point that a German friend of ours couldn't hold a conversation with him. We theorized that he might actually be a Cuban refugee. In the U.S., I also knew a guy in NY Chinatown who had been in the U.S. for over 20 years and still didn't speak English.

I and a good friend of mine whom I was sharing a room with, on the other hand, made a point to get out a bit more, and not just to the touristy spots that cater to foreigners. We were both holding basic conversations in Chinese within a matter of months, and left China a few years later nearly fluent in Chinese.

I was also stationed in Japan for two years. There were people I was stationed with who literally didn't leave the base the entire time we were there. I couldn't even get them to go to the Japanese McDonald's a five minute walk off base. Forget getting them to take a couple days off and head to Tokyo or the Aomori ice festival. Those of us who liked to get out referred to them as barracks rats.

I've enjoyed all the traveling I've done, but I also must admit that I've still managed to become even more of the cliché 'Murican in many ways regardless. I loved living abroad, but I always missed my guns Tongue

Hey in less than a year I'll have both a U.S. and Canadian passport.

So when you compare your take on the world with friends back in the US do you find that your experiences abroad changed your views as compared to theirs?

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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05-05-2015, 09:52 AM
RE: Travel
(05-05-2015 09:49 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  
(05-05-2015 09:45 AM)yakherder Wrote:  I've learned that not everyone views their experiences in the same way while traveling.

In China, for example, I met a British guy who had been there for over 10 years and couldn't even ask "How much does that cost?" in Chinese. We also met this old German guy who'd been there so long his Chinese was indistinguishable from a person born in China, but his German had deteriorated to the point that a German friend of ours couldn't hold a conversation with him. We theorized that he might actually be a Cuban refugee. In the U.S., I also knew a guy in NY Chinatown who had been in the U.S. for over 20 years and still didn't speak English.

I and a good friend of mine whom I was sharing a room with, on the other hand, made a point to get out a bit more, and not just to the touristy spots that cater to foreigners. We were both holding basic conversations in Chinese within a matter of months, and left China a few years later nearly fluent in Chinese.

I was also stationed in Japan for two years. There were people I was stationed with who literally didn't leave the base the entire time we were there. I couldn't even get them to go to the Japanese McDonald's a five minute walk off base. Forget getting them to take a couple days off and head to Tokyo or the Aomori ice festival. Those of us who liked to get out referred to them as barracks rats.

I've enjoyed all the traveling I've done, but I also must admit that I've still managed to become even more of the cliché 'Murican in many ways regardless. I loved living abroad, but I always missed my guns Tongue

Hey in less than a year I'll have both a U.S. and Canadian passport.

So when you compare your take on the world with friends back in the US do you find that your experiences abroad changed your views as compared to theirs?

Without a doubt. I still may have my 'Murican tendencies, but I don't necessarily view other ways as wrong. But again, even those of us who travel have different experiences. I've had the opportunity to go to a wide variety of places. Some of my fellow soldiers have ONLY been to the shitty places while getting shot at, which only served to strengthen their biases.

'Murican Canadian
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05-05-2015, 09:58 AM
RE: Travel
(05-05-2015 09:52 AM)yakherder Wrote:  
(05-05-2015 09:49 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  So when you compare your take on the world with friends back in the US do you find that your experiences abroad changed your views as compared to theirs?

Without a doubt. I still may have my 'Murican tendencies, but I don't necessarily view other ways as wrong. But again, even those of us who travel have different experiences. I've had the opportunity to go to a wide variety of places. Some of my fellow soldiers have ONLY been to the shitty places while getting shot at, which only served to strengthen their biases.

You and I are Yankanucks. Big Grin

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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05-05-2015, 11:03 AM
Travel
At the moment, mine is #6. When I get a chance, I'm out. Depending on where I go, I can use my Canadian passport or my USA passport.
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05-05-2015, 11:17 AM
RE: Travel
(05-05-2015 09:49 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  
(05-05-2015 09:45 AM)yakherder Wrote:  I've learned that not everyone views their experiences in the same way while traveling.

In China, for example, I met a British guy who had been there for over 10 years and couldn't even ask "How much does that cost?" in Chinese. We also met this old German guy who'd been there so long his Chinese was indistinguishable from a person born in China, but his German had deteriorated to the point that a German friend of ours couldn't hold a conversation with him. We theorized that he might actually be a Cuban refugee. In the U.S., I also knew a guy in NY Chinatown who had been in the U.S. for over 20 years and still didn't speak English.

I and a good friend of mine whom I was sharing a room with, on the other hand, made a point to get out a bit more, and not just to the touristy spots that cater to foreigners. We were both holding basic conversations in Chinese within a matter of months, and left China a few years later nearly fluent in Chinese.

I was also stationed in Japan for two years. There were people I was stationed with who literally didn't leave the base the entire time we were there. I couldn't even get them to go to the Japanese McDonald's a five minute walk off base. Forget getting them to take a couple days off and head to Tokyo or the Aomori ice festival. Those of us who liked to get out referred to them as barracks rats.

I've enjoyed all the traveling I've done, but I also must admit that I've still managed to become even more of the cliché 'Murican in many ways regardless. I loved living abroad, but I always missed my guns Tongue

Hey in less than a year I'll have both a U.S. and Canadian passport.

So when you compare your take on the world with friends back in the US do you find that your experiences abroad changed your views as compared to theirs?

And to add to my previous post, my view on language is different than a lot of Americans or Canadians. In much of America it's learn the language or get out, and in Quebec people are so paranoid about English overtaking French that they've got language auditors who go around passing out tickets for infractions. At a Chinese restaurant I frequent, the owner got a $500 fine for greeting one of these auditors with "hello bonjour" instead of "bonjour hello," because you're supposed to greet in French first. All business signs must also have French in a larger font than, and on top of, any English text.

I just can't bring myself to be emotionally attached to a language. The whole world could convert to Esperanto for all I care. I learn languages because I have a rational reason to do so, but I don't feel bad about the fact that languages become extinct when speaking them is no longer practical.

'Murican Canadian
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06-05-2015, 07:46 AM
RE: Travel
(05-05-2015 11:17 AM)yakherder Wrote:  And to add to my previous post, my view on language is different than a lot of Americans or Canadians. In much of America it's learn the language or get out, and in Quebec people are so paranoid about English overtaking French that they've got language auditors who go around passing out tickets for infractions. At a Chinese restaurant I frequent, the owner got a $500 fine for greeting one of these auditors with "hello bonjour" instead of "bonjour hello," because you're supposed to greet in French first. All business signs must also have French in a larger font than, and on top of, any English text.

I just can't bring myself to be emotionally attached to a language. The whole world could convert to Esperanto for all I care. I learn languages because I have a rational reason to do so, but I don't feel bad about the fact that languages become extinct when speaking them is no longer practical.

That is crazy.

Americans can get hung up on language, maybe not as extreme as the Canucks, but still. In more than one instance while I have been speaking Spanish I have heard people numble nearby, “learn to speak English” not realizing that I speak both fluently, English more so than Spanish. I speak it more out of necessity than anything else but I’m glad I know more than one, especially when I travel South of the Border or to Spain.

I find it ironic that a country made up of immigrants has little tolerence for immigrants.

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”~Mark Twain
“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”~ Ambrose Bierce
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