Travel tips for Germany?
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27-04-2013, 03:44 PM
RE: Travel tips for Germany?
Quote:I'm definitely looking forward to chugging some right along with 'em. Big Grin

Sweet! If I may suggest one thing, try to learn some of the basic lingo - that has always broken the ice for me when going abroad (I imagine you've done this, but I've seen too many travelers who don't, so I won't assume!). You might find this program quite helpful:

One-Day German by Elisabeth Smith. She makes a series of 75-minute one-disc language programs that are geared towards the traveler (I burned the lessons to an iPod and took it with me). Her approach is to teach 50 of the most needed words and a couple of bonus phrases, and the disc comes with a cheat sheet as well.

I have the German, French, Italian, and Spanish discs (haven't made it to Italy or Germany yet, though), and in each she plays an air-traveler teaching the applicable lingo to a seatmate named Andy, complete with airline sound effects - so its not just a boring "repeat after me" lecture.

NOTE: Did a search on Amazon and Barnes & Noble, but the "One-Day" series appears to be out of print and therefore a bit spendy. But it looks like there is an updated equivalent, which in your case would be the "Elisabeth's Smith's Last-Minute German" set for about fourteen bucks.

Anyway, just a tip - hope you have an excellent time! Thumbsup
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27-04-2013, 04:29 PM (This post was last modified: 27-04-2013 04:37 PM by cufflink.)
RE: Travel tips for Germany?
(27-04-2013 03:44 PM)Atheist_pilgrim Wrote:  
Quote:I'm definitely looking forward to chugging some right along with 'em. Big Grin

Sweet! If I may suggest one thing, try to learn some of the basic lingo - that has always broken the ice for me when going abroad (I imagine you've done this, but I've seen too many travelers who don't, so I won't assume!). You might find this program quite helpful:

One-Day German by Elisabeth Smith. She makes a series of 75-minute one-disc language programs that are geared towards the traveler (I burned the lessons to an iPod and took it with me). Her approach is to teach 50 of the most needed words and a couple of bonus phrases, and the disc comes with a cheat sheet as well.

I have the German, French, Italian, and Spanish discs (haven't made it to Italy or Germany yet, though), and in each she plays an air-traveler teaching the applicable lingo to a seatmate named Andy, complete with airline sound effects - so its not just a boring "repeat after me" lecture.

NOTE: Did a search on Amazon and Barnes & Noble, but the "One-Day" series appears to be out of print and therefore a bit spendy. But it looks like there is an updated equivalent, which in your case would be the "Elisabeth's Smith's Last-Minute German" set for about fourteen bucks.

Anyway, just a tip - hope you have an excellent time! Thumbsup

A person after my own heart! I agree 100%. Whenever I travel to a place where English isn't the vernacular, I try to learn a few phrases in the local language. People really appreciate it--it's a sign of respect.

I had a year's worth of German when I was in college (a very long time ago), so I have a foundation to build on. But I'll be relying heavily on my phrasebook, since my vocabulary is pathetic. Thanks for the tip about the Last-Minute series! I'll check it out.

One of my nicest language experiences was in Paris, years ago. I have a fair amount of French, although I'm far from fluent. One time I was standing in line to buy concert tickets. There were several Americans ahead of me, and when they got to the ticket window I could hear their transactions, in English, with the ticket agent. She was a young woman who spoke very good English--and, I have no doubt, several other languages as well. But I was determined to trot out my français; I wasn't going to make progress if I didn't practice. It went rather well. I was obviously a non-native speaker, but we understood each other without a problem and I got the right tickets. At the end, she smiled sweetly and said, "Merci d'avoir parlé français, monsieur." ("Thanks for speaking French, monsieur.") That really felt good.

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27-04-2013, 05:05 PM
RE: Travel tips for Germany?
I don't need any travel tips. Thanks though.

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect.”

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27-04-2013, 05:51 PM
RE: Travel tips for Germany?
(27-04-2013 03:43 PM)cufflink Wrote:  Vosur, was sagen Sie?
I agree with the article, "Ich bin ein Berliner" is the correct way to say that you're a citizen of the city Berlin.

By the way, the same misconception could have been made if he said "Ich bin ein Amerikaner" ("I am an American") because "Amerikaner" is the name of yet another baked good in Germany. Laughat

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27-04-2013, 05:55 PM
RE: Travel tips for Germany?
Yum. Smile
As far as I'm concerned; all is right with the world as long as there is pastry. Wink

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27-04-2013, 06:06 PM
RE: Travel tips for Germany?
(27-04-2013 03:44 PM)Atheist_pilgrim Wrote:  Sweet! If I may suggest one thing, try to learn some of the basic lingo - that has always broken the ice for me when going abroad (I imagine you've done this, but I've seen too many travelers who don't, so I won't assume!). You might find this program quite helpful:

One-Day German by Elisabeth Smith. She makes a series of 75-minute one-disc language programs that are geared towards the traveler (I burned the lessons to an iPod and took it with me). Her approach is to teach 50 of the most needed words and a couple of bonus phrases, and the disc comes with a cheat sheet as well.
While that may be useful for him when he's in Cologne and Berlin, it's not going to help him when he's in Bavaria (Bayreuth and Munich). Drinking Beverage

Their dialect is such a slaughter of the German language that even I am unable to communicate with them. Dodgy



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