Trump's new pick for labor secretary just doesn't get why workers need breaks
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30-12-2016, 12:40 PM
RE: Trump's new pick for labor secretary just doesn't get why workers need breaks
(29-12-2016 02:50 PM)Lord Dark Helmet Wrote:  
(29-12-2016 02:45 PM)Gloucester Wrote:  Sorry, not understanding the crazy way you do things over there I don't see the relevance of your post in the thread LDH.

Or was it just a random, slightly childish, retaliatory dig?

No. It's relevant because the labor department will probably come up with a bunch of new employer friendly regs and the federal courts and supreme court are going to be packed with conservative judges, making challenging new regulations difficult.

Many states can and do exceed Federal guidelines regarding breaks, wages, benefits, etc. You're retired ... you can afford to laugh.
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30-12-2016, 01:08 PM
RE: Trump's new pick for labor secretary just doesn't get why workers need breaks
(30-12-2016 11:57 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  
(30-12-2016 07:58 AM)Deesse23 Wrote:  Germans werent gullible, but rather, desperate, frustrated and disappointed by things as they were in the late 20s/early 30s. Of course that makes you more susceptible to promises.

October revolution in the US? No.fucking.way. Russia by 1917 (and it was already by 1905) was completely rotten, beyond any chance of recovery. The US is not even operating in the same league.

Thanks for the corrections, Deesse. Yes, susceptible is a far better word. And my analogues were stretched too far, human nature being as it is there will be some similarities in any nation under pressures they feel they have little control over.

I'll get me coat then . . .

If anything can be said about german people in general, then its probably "Obrigkeitshörigkeit" (arent compound words amazing Big Grin Tongue ), which means obedience to authorities. The failed revolution of 1848 and its backlash in particular (supression of any dissent, censorship, the authorities constantly spying) combined with the success of the prussian model of authoritarianism (and a war won against the arch enemy, France) combined with actually provinding for the people (Bismarck introduced the social security system in the 1880s, which is still in existence today, and he was a staunch anti-parliamentarian, he just hated the Reichstag) formed a population that was very conformist. If you think of the revolution of 1918, just think about what the people had to endure to finally decide to give up authoritarianism.

Ceterum censeo, religionem delendam esse
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30-12-2016, 03:57 PM
RE: Trump's new pick for labor secretary just doesn't get why workers need breaks
(30-12-2016 01:08 PM)Deesse23 Wrote:  
(30-12-2016 11:57 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  Thanks for the corrections, Deesse. Yes, susceptible is a far better word. And my analogues were stretched too far, human nature being as it is there will be some similarities in any nation under pressures they feel they have little control over.

I'll get me coat then . . .

If anything can be said about german people in general, then its probably "Obrigkeitshörigkeit" (arent compound words amazing Big Grin Tongue ), which means obedience to authorities. The failed revolution of 1848 and its backlash in particular (supression of any dissent, censorship, the authorities constantly spying) combined with the success of the prussian model of authoritarianism (and a war won against the arch enemy, France) combined with actually provinding for the people (Bismarck introduced the social security system in the 1880s, which is still in existence today, and he was a staunch anti-parliamentarian, he just hated the Reichstag) formed a population that was very conformist. If you think of the revolution of 1918, just think about what the people had to endure to finally decide to give up authoritarianism.

Authoritarianism with a huge sprinkling of fear and paranoia. Don't speak out, don't tell others what you think, it may not go well for you. Just keep quiet and keep on keeping on.

Or maybe that was just my atheist parents living in a hotbed of Catholicism, or because mom helped hide her sister's Jewish husband, or because my dad's mom was feeding the prisoners who were marched past her house daily... But I remember huge paranoia in my parents and all our relatives when I was growing up. You didn't talk about politics or religion - no one did.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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30-12-2016, 04:17 PM
RE: Trump's new pick for labor secretary just doesn't get why workers need breaks
The FLSA does not require:
Optional employee benefits and payroll practices not required under any law - this category includes such things as:
Breaks - although some states require breaks, Texas and most other states do not - federal law has no break requirement, other than OSHA rules about restroom breaks for sanitation purposes
(see https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp...RETATIONS) - the only exceptions are found in special regulations relating to highly hazardous occupations such as high-altitude steel erection workers or nuclear plant workers - most companies do allow some sort of breaks, however, in their policies.
Breast-pumping / nursing breaks - these are unpaid breaks - under the 2010 health care reform bill, new FLSA section 207®(1) requires employers to give non-exempt nursing mothers reasonable break times to express breast milk, or if children are allowed in the office, nurse their infants, during the first year after the baby's birth (for more information, see "Nursing Mothers" in this outline).
"Coffee breaks" (rest breaks) are paid, since they are regarded as promoting productivity and efficiency on the part of employees and thus benefit the employer - 20 minutes or less in duration.
"Smoking breaks" - smoking breaks are not required under Texas or federal law, are in the same category as rest breaks (see above), and may be controlled in any way with appropriate policies.
"Lunch breaks" are unpaid - defined as 30 minutes or longer for the purpose of eating a meal - employee must be "fully relieved of duties" during the meal break - if employee is answering phones, filing, or otherwise working while eating, the "break" is counted as regular work time.
Premium, holiday, and weekend pay - this is extra pay for unusual hours, such as "double time" or "triple time" pay for working extra overtime or during times when most employees take off - this is not required under any law, but is often a matter of supply and demand, i.e., whatever is necessary to get employees to be available at unusual times.
Shift differentials - defined as higher hourly pay for second or third shifts, as opposed to the normal hourly rate given to workers on the daytime shift - as with "premium pay" above, this is a function of supply and demand.
Raises - not required under state or federal laws, unless the minimum wage is increased on either the federal or the state level. However, even though raises are not required, withdrawing a raise that has previously been promised could give an employee good cause to quit. Important: once a raise goes into effect, the employer must pay it until it is withdrawn - it may be withdrawn only prospectively, never retroactively - a retroactive pay cut will always violate the law.
Pensions - pension or retirement plans are not required - however, keep the "1000-hour rule" in mind in case you have a pension...

http://www.twc.state.tx.us/news/efte/fls...nt_do.html

This guy is certainly not breaking new ground.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
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