Two quick questions
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
14-11-2016, 04:11 PM
RE: Two quick questions
1. Yes. It can give people false hopes or fears. It can prevent them from questioning their morals. It discourages people from asking questions and being open to scientific discoveries. People might look forward to an afterlife, rather than enjoy the life they've got to the fullest because something they want to do is against their religious beliefs. (It's the last one that bothers me the most. >.<) Of course there are postive things about religion, like the hope it gives and the way it brings people together to do good things. But religion isn't necessary for that to happen.

2. I like not worrying about going to Hell. ^.^ And I like feeling confident in my views because I don't believe in things without evidence. If I tried to believe in God I would fail at it, lol. ^^ And I'm glad I don't have to get up super early for church like one of my friends at school does! Oh, and I like that I don't have to take religion so seriously. I can laugh at the strange things about it.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like AnaBunny's post
14-11-2016, 04:14 PM
RE: Two quick questions
"One bad.

One good."
Mongo.

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2016, 05:14 PM
RE: Two quick questions
As has been pointed out already, there is no "atheist" way of thinking, since atheism is only a "no" answer to a single question: "Do you worship any gods?" (and/or "do you think any of the gods described by humans are real?"

There's really nothing more to it. It is quite literally impossible to have an atheist position other than that one.

On the other hand, atheists tend to adopt the scientific method of skeptically looking at questions and trying to avoid/eliminate preformulated answers and personal bias in finding the answers, which makes us (shall we say) less than popular among people who really like their preformulated answers and personal biases. Deciding that one rejects all the god-stories told by their fellow human beings means that you're going to have a pretty rough time, socially, if you live in a culture that has strong religious roots. In the United States, it often means alienation from family and the accusation that you're an immoral or amoral person, untrustworthy, and perhaps someone who deserves to be attacked.

Insofar as religion inspires people to be kinder to others, to be more conscious of their fellow human beings' basic humanity and dignity, I applaud it. Sadly, too often we atheists are left holding the mantle of fighting against Christians who would love to install elements of theocracy in our ostensibly secular Republic. And yet, rather than thanking us for standing up against what should appall every American, we're lashed with hatred for taking on this duty of preserving religious freedom in this country via government neutrality (secularism). I think that, on the whole, religion does more harm than good, by encouraging insular and exclusionist (Us-vs-Them) thinking and preserving Bronze Age tribal warrior blood religion prejudices into the modern era, when we should know better.

If Christians (and others... some religions, such as Islam, have elements that are even worse than Christianity) spent more time focusing on themselves and not on trying to enforce their vision onto the rest of us, I might have a better opinion of them. I often quote Mahatma Gandhi, from when he was asked his opinion about Christianity: "I like your Christ, but I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ."

Don't get me wrong; I'm not praising Gandhi's Hinduism... they're some of the worst offenders, in that regard. They simply don't have many representatives in the USA, so I don't have to worry about their influence quite as much.

I'll leave you with the quote that I think best sums up atheism and its outlook:

"I contend we are both atheists, I just believe in one fewer god than you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours." - Stephen F. Roberts

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like RocketSurgeon76's post
14-11-2016, 06:05 PM
RE: Two quick questions
1. I do not think religion is bad
2. There is nothing I like nor dislike about atheism.

Ones religious beliefs don't define who one is, atheism is merely the absence of the belief in a god, of which is not really important to me what someone chooses to believe personally because that is their own right to do so.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2016, 06:38 PM
RE: Two quick questions
1. Do you think religion is bad? Why?
Yes, I think religion is bad.
* It teaches you to not think for yourself.
* It teaches you to trust something/someone which/who cannot be proven to even exist.
* It plants unreasonable fear in you
* It brainwashes children
* It claims knowledge and ultimate truth where it is unreasonable to do so
* It leads you away from asking questions and even makes you feel bad or silly for that
* It is harmful to poor people (depending on religion this looks different. ex. caste system in hinduism / condemning safe sex in christianity)
* It is harmful to mentally weak people (uneducated, very young, very old, mentally ill, grieving, or scared people, etc)
* It wastes your time by making you do silly rituals
* Missionaries are the fucking worst people and they don't ever realize because they think they are doing something good.
* It creates the worst incidents of violence on the planet. Crusades, Holocaust, Witchhunters, ISIS, ...
* It creates the most hate on the planet. Hate against everybody who does not believe the same. There are very few religions that do not do that.

2. What do you like most about atheism?
I am not sure what is there to like or dislike about atheism.
Atheism is simply stating a fact. Theism the belief in god and Atheism the lack of belief in a god.
So there isn't anything to like really.
I am feeling lucky though because, where I live, I have the freedom of and from religion (at least to a certain point. In some instances it will still be shoved down my throat but I can live with that) so I do not have to pay lip service and pretend things.

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 5 users Like Leerob's post
14-11-2016, 06:56 PM
RE: Two quick questions
(14-11-2016 06:38 PM)Leela Wrote:  1. Do you think religion is bad? Why?
Yes, I think religion is bad.
* It teaches you to not think for yourself.
* It teaches you to trust something/someone which/who cannot be proven to even exist.
* It plants unreasonable fear in you
* It brainwashes children
* It claims knowledge and ultimate truth where it is unreasonable to do so
* It leads you away from asking questions and even makes you feel bad or silly for that
* It is harmful to poor people (depending on religion this looks different. ex. caste system in hinduism / condemning safe sex in christianity)
* It is harmful to mentally weak people (uneducated, very young, very old, mentally ill, grieving, or scared people, etc)
* It wastes your time by making you do silly rituals
* Missionaries are the fucking worst people and they don't ever realize because they think they are doing something good.
* It creates the worst incidents of violence on the planet. Crusades, Holocaust, Witchhunters, ISIS, ...
* It creates the most hate on the planet. Hate against everybody who does not believe the same. There are very few religions that do not do that.

2. What do you like most about atheism?
I am not sure what is there to like or dislike about atheism.
Atheism is simply stating a fact. Theism the belief in god and Atheism the lack of belief in a god.
So there isn't anything to like really.
I am feeling lucky though because, where I live, I have the freedom of and from religion (at least to a certain point. In some instances it will still be shoved down my throat but I can live with that) so I do not have to pay lip service and pretend things.

Leela I think you've got religion confused with the government. I mean seriously almost everything you've said about religion can be attached to the government.

Remember when communism was the reason why there was so much violence in the world and everything was always so bad? Remember when that reason was Monarchies and democracy was going to kick in and make the world a great place? I remember.

Religion is the new scapegoat for imperialism.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2016, 07:20 PM
RE: Two quick questions
(14-11-2016 01:16 PM)Jokurix Wrote:  Hi! Really liking this atheist forum, I realize I'm becoming more and more involved as times goes!

I wanted to ask my fellow atheists.

1. Do you think religion is bad? Why?

2. What do you like most about atheism?

I'll stick with answering 1, because 2 has been my entire life experience and I don't really have anything to compare it against.

I don't have anything against religion, in general, per se.

What I am strongly opposed to is epistemic faith, which most religions not only incorporate but require, tout, flaunt, and extol. Convincing yourself that the very fact that you believe something with conviction is itself cause to regard that belief as justified can justify anything and everything, while trapping you in a false belief with no means of escape. It doesn't actually help you arrive at the belief (because faith only works if you already know what belief you're going to have faith in), but it does prevent you from leaving it. It also takes difficult debates, introspection, and reality checks, and renders them impossible. So many of the world's wars and other problems could be eliminated if people would just adopt a rational, evidence-based approach to reality.

Beyond that, I am opposed to particular religions that incorporate (and more significantly promote and practice) harmful doctrines and dogmas. Christianity is the chief example that comes to mind, due to its prevalence and impact in my corner of the world, but Islam and Scientology both also make that list, and to a lesser degree Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, and probably quite a few more that aren't coming to mind at the moment.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Reltzik's post
14-11-2016, 07:29 PM (This post was last modified: 14-11-2016 07:34 PM by RocketSurgeon76.)
RE: Two quick questions
(14-11-2016 06:56 PM)Celestial_Wonder Wrote:  Leela I think you've got religion confused with the government. I mean seriously almost everything you've said about religion can be attached to the government.

Remember when communism was the reason why there was so much violence in the world and everything was always so bad? Remember when that reason was Monarchies and democracy was going to kick in and make the world a great place? I remember.

Religion is the new scapegoat for imperialism.

That doesn't make any sense. Government has its own set of problems, to be sure, but she's not confusing religion for government in the slightest.

Communism, though a form of economic outlook (and government), was effectively a state religion, with its own set of imposed beliefs and dogmas that were unquestionable. It discouraged independent thinking in the same way--and for the same reason--as religion did.

Similarly, monarchies claimed to have divine backing: literally, it was called "the divine right of kings" (to rule), claiming that God Himself (or "the gods themselves", in the case of polytheistic versions) had appointed that ruler a natural right to rule over the subject peoples. It was another form of state religion.

Democracy, in the modern sense, was an attempt to separate ourselves from the divine right of kings and to create a secular (literally meaning "of this world") government "of the people, by the people, and for the people". Whether or not we live up to that ideal is another question, of course.

Edit to Add: secularus; seculara

adjective
Definitions:

secular/temporal/worldly (as opposed to ecclesiastical)

http://www.latin-dictionary.net/definiti...s-seculara

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 7 users Like RocketSurgeon76's post
14-11-2016, 07:41 PM
RE: Two quick questions
1. Do you think religion is bad? Why?

I think religion is bad overall because it makes people stop questioning their reality and their own worth and life so they can instead accept a fantasy. It's a comforting fantasy but also incredibly scary and evil, it basically tells you that from the moment of birth you are broken, tainted by evil and unworthy of love or forgiveness but if you follow some rules and bow to a sky wizard everything will be ok. It's also pretty astounding the evil acts a group of people will commit because they think they have the blessing of the ruler of the universe, they actually think that shit, and then do horrible things.

I find that the truth of our own origins (even though it remains a mystery), our place the cosmos and the connection we have to every other living thing to be the much better story than what religion has to offer, it's really just fairy tales. I like a good fairy tale but I won't let it control my life, that would be silly.

I think that is a clearly fucked up and immoral premise to start with and I have to admit that religion has done some good, their charitable efforts are noteworthy and the history of art and architecture would be totally different if religion never existed, even ancient Greek and roman myths brought about incredible structures of beauty and it was all done for religious purposes but we've moved past it now, it's really time to let it go and embrace truth, even if it burns you.

2. What do you like most about atheism?

I like information, knowledge, researching, etc. I've always loved to read and to know answers to any questions that popped into my head, being an atheist allows me to accept anything new I may come across, if I believed in one truth and reality was showing me it was false that would be very uncomfortable and I'd look like an idiot going around claiming to know something with no evidence and I tend to dislike looking like a fool.

I also like that I don't have to bow down to a tyrant because he may torture me after my death, even if he did I won't let it control me just because I fear pain. I love freedom more than I feel pain and if you went your whole life loving the thing that has the power to hurt you just because you don't want to be tortured, well you're not really living and you're basically a robot and you may be wasting the one life you had, the only one you were ever going to get just because you were afraid, that's pretty fucking sad.

[Image: sagansig_zps6vhbql6m.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like SitaSky's post
14-11-2016, 07:46 PM
RE: Two quick questions
(14-11-2016 07:29 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  
(14-11-2016 06:56 PM)Celestial_Wonder Wrote:  Leela I think you've got religion confused with the government. I mean seriously almost everything you've said about religion can be attached to the government.

Remember when communism was the reason why there was so much violence in the world and everything was always so bad? Remember when that reason was Monarchies and democracy was going to kick in and make the world a great place? I remember.

Religion is the new scapegoat for imperialism.

That doesn't make any sense. Government has its own set of problems, to be sure, but she's not confusing religion for government in the slightest.

Communism, though a form of economic outlook (and government), was effectively a state religion, with its own set of imposed beliefs and dogmas that were unquestionable. It discouraged independent thinking in the same way--and for the same reason--as religion did.

Similarly, monarchies claimed to have divine backing: literally, it was called "the divine right of kings" (to rule), claiming that God Himself (or "the gods themselves", in the case of polytheistic versions) had appointed that ruler a natural right to rule over the subject peoples. It was another form of state religion.

Democracy, in the modern sense, was an attempt to separate ourselves from the divine right of kings and to create a secular (literally meaning "of this world") government "of the people, by the people, and for the people". Whether or not we live up to that ideal is another question, of course.

See now the mistake you're making here is calling communism a religion and then trying to make it appear as different from democracy as possible. Even though communism arose is russia, ousted a king, and ended the influence of the church over/in the state. You might remember a little guy called Rasputin, rumored to have shagged the Tsarina Alexandria, also rumored to be incredibly well endowed.

Communism also preached the entire of the people, by the people, and for the people thing.

So yeah, not to different from democracy, except in administration kind of.

Probably heard about a state called Iran, don't know if you know about the Iranian Shah that killed millions that The United States put into power. Not an isolated incident either, coups were commonplace in the cold war, and they're beginning to be commonplace again what with the Arab Spring.

And you may or may not be familiar with the western propaganda campaign in the cold war either, because that's resurfacing now as well. What with all the jive we're hearing about islam its like if we were watching Star Wars, except instead of the Empire there was like some new evil that was threatening the galaxy and even had a new name for themselves 'the First Order'.

Oh wait... that is a thing... except the only difference is that in the cold war they actually made a pretty good effort at making good propaganda just like they put effort into making good movies. Now everything is pretty much a rip off where they're trying to rehash the old stuff into something new.

I mean that in both the propaganda and the movies. Star Wars is dead to me.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: