Types and examples of scribal errors
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15-09-2015, 08:31 PM
RE: Types and examples of scribal errors
(15-09-2015 08:18 PM)docskeptic Wrote:  
(15-09-2015 07:21 PM)Alla Wrote:  I was not talking about things that do NOT exist in nature. numbers are symbols that are created by men.

Just like God.

Doc
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15-09-2015, 09:50 PM
RE: Types and examples of scribal errors
(15-09-2015 07:21 PM)Alla Wrote:  
(15-09-2015 06:12 PM)docskeptic Wrote:  No. Not true on both points. The series of negative numbers has no beginning but ends at 0.

Doc
I was not talking about things that do NOT exist in nature. numbers are symbols that are created by men.

Numerals are symbols created by man. Numbers exist in nature.

We have enough youth. How about looking for the Fountain of Smart?
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15-09-2015, 10:27 PM
RE: Types and examples of scribal errors
(15-09-2015 09:50 PM)Thinkerbelle Wrote:  
(15-09-2015 07:21 PM)Alla Wrote:  I was not talking about things that do NOT exist in nature. numbers are symbols that are created by men.

Numerals are symbols created by man. Numbers exist in nature.

Kind of. Cardinality is subjective fiat.

They're an immensely useful construct nonetheless.

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16-09-2015, 02:27 PM
RE: Types and examples of scribal errors
Tip-toein' on

A. ANCIENT ERRORS (prior to the invention of printing):

a. Unintentional errors:

2. Errors due to faulty hearing.
2d. Wrong consonants:

Sometimes similar sounding consonants could be mixed up, like κ and ξ.

For example Mark 11: 14 says, "Then he said to the tree, "May no one ever eat fruit from you (ἐκ σοῦ) again."

Other manuscripts say, "Then he said to the tree, "May no one ever eat fruit from whom (έξ οΰ) again.”

It's bad enough that Jesus talks to trees, but bad grammar just adds insult to injury.

Doc
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18-09-2015, 11:06 AM
RE: Types and examples of scribal errors
Staggering on.

A. ANCIENT ERRORS (prior to the invention of printing):

a. Unintentional errors:

2. Errors due to faulty hearing.
2d. Wrong consonants:


Sometimes, the scribe would get completely muddled and mix up consonants that don't even sound alike. Conceivably, the reader of the text could also have mis-pronounced the word.

For example, Rev. 15: 6 says, “Out of the temple came the seven angels with the seven plagues. They were dressed in pure bright linen.” (λινον)

But the scribe of Codex Bezae wrote , “Out of the temple came the seven angels with the seven plagues. They were dressed in pure bright stone.” (λιθον)

Doc
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19-09-2015, 03:18 PM
RE: Types and examples of scribal errors
(16-09-2015 02:27 PM)docskeptic Wrote:  Tip-toein' on

A. ANCIENT ERRORS (prior to the invention of printing):

a. Unintentional errors:

2. Errors due to faulty hearing.
2d. Wrong consonants:

Sometimes similar sounding consonants could be mixed up, like κ and ξ.

For example Mark 11: 14 says, "Then he said to the tree, "May no one ever eat fruit from you (ἐκ σοῦ) again."

Other manuscripts say, "Then he said to the tree, "May no one ever eat fruit from whom (έξ οΰ) again.”

It's bad enough that Jesus talks to trees, but bad grammar just adds insult to injury.

Doc

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