US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
10-02-2012, 01:31 PM
US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
I have mentioned the Rap Sheet I have for US Foreign Policy.

Here is a partial list of US attitude on the diplomatic front. I have a lot more historical data to present.

For those who do not read carefully, items in the list are UN resolutions that the US VETOED!

History of US vetoes of UN Security Council Resolutions

1972 Condemns Israel for killing hundreds of people in Syria and Lebanon in air raids.

1973 Affirms the rights of the Palestinians and calls on Israel to withdraw from the occupied territories.

1976 Condemns Israel for attacking Lebanese civilians.

1976 Condemns Israel for building settlements in the occupied territories.

1976 Calls for self determination for the Palestinians.

1976 Affirms the rights of the Palestinians.

1978 Urges the permanent members (USA, USSR, UK, France, China) to insure United Nations decisions on the maintenance of international peace and security.

1978 Criticises the living conditions of the Palestinians.

1978 Condemns the Israeli human rights record in occupied territories.

1978 Calls for developed countries to increase the quantity and quality of development assistance to underdeveloped countries.

1979 Calls for an end to all military and nuclear collaboration with the apartheid South Africa.

1979 Strengthens the arms embargo against South Africa.

1979 Offers assistance to all the oppressed people of South Africa and their liberation movement.

1979 Concerns negotiations on disarmament and cessation of the nuclear arms race.

1979 Calls for the return of all inhabitants expelled by Israel.

1979 Demands that Israel desist from human rights violations.

1979 Requests a report on the living conditions of Palestinians in occupied Arab countries.

1979 Offers assistance to the Palestinian people.

1979 Discusses sovereignty over national resources in occupied Arab territories.

1979 Calls for protection of developing counties' exports.

1979 Calls for alternative approaches within the United Nations system for improving the enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

1979 Opposes support for intervention in the internal or external affairs of states.

1979 For a United Nations Conference on Women.

1979 To include Palestinian women in the United Nations Conference on Women.

1979 Safeguards rights of developing countries in multinational trade negotiations.

1980 Requests Israel to return displaced persons.

1980 Condemns Israeli policy regarding the living conditions of the Palestinian people.

1980 Condemns Israeli human rights practices in occupied territories. 3 resolutions.

1980 Affirms the right of self determination for the Palestinians.

1980 Offers assistance to the oppressed people of South Africa and their national liberation movement.

1980 Attempts to establish a New International Economic Order to promote the growth of underdeveloped countries and international economic co-operation.

1980 Endorses the Program of Action for Second Half of United Nations Decade for Women.

1980 Declaration of non-use of nuclear weapons against non-nuclear states.

1980 Emphasises that the development of nations and individuals is a human right.

1980 Calls for the cessation of all nuclear test explosions.

1980 Calls for the implementation of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.

1981 Promotes co-operative movements in developing countries.

1981 Affirms the right of every state to choose its economic and social system in accord with the will of its people, without outside interference in whatever form it takes.

1981 Condemns activities of foreign economic interests in colonial territories.

1981 Calls for the cessation of all test explosions of nuclear weapons.

1981 Calls for action in support of measures to prevent nuclear war, curb the arms race and promote disarmament.

1981 Urges negotiations on prohibition of chemical and biological weapons.

1981 Declares that education, work, health care, proper nourishment, national development, etc are human rights.

1981 Condemns South Africa for attacks on neighbouring states, condemns apartheid and attempts to strengthen sanctions. 7 resolutions.

1981 Condemns an attempted coup by South Africa on the Seychelles.

1981 Condemns Israel's treatment of the Palestinians, human rights policies, and the bombing of Iraq. 18 resolutions.

1982 Condemns the Israeli invasion of Lebanon. 6 resolutions (1982 to 1983).

1982 Condemns the shooting of 11 Muslims at a shrine in Jerusalem by an Israeli soldier.

1982 Calls on Israel to withdraw from the Golan Heights occupied in 1967.

1982 Condemns apartheid and calls for the cessation of economic aid to South Africa. 4 resolutions.

1982 Calls for the setting up of a World Charter for the protection of the ecology.

1982 Sets up a United Nations conference on succession of states in respect to state property, archives and debts.

1982 Nuclear test bans and negotiations and nuclear free outer space. 3 resolutions.

1982 Supports a new world information and communications order.

1982 Prohibition of chemical and bacteriological weapons.

1982 Development of international law.

1982 Protects against products harmful to health and the environment .

1982 Declares that education, work, health care, proper nourishment, national development are human rights.

1982 Protects against products harmful to health and the environment.

1982 Development of the energy resources of developing countries.

1983 Resolutions about apartheid, nuclear arms, economics, and international law. 15 resolutions.

1984 Condemns support of South Africa in its Namibian and other policies.

1984 International action to eliminate apartheid.

1984 Condemns Israel for occupying and attacking southern Lebanon.

1984 Resolutions about apartheid, nuclear arms, economics, and international law. 18 resolutions.

1985 Condemns Israel for occupying and attacking southern Lebanon.

1985 Condemns Israel for using excessive force in the occupied territories.

1985 Resolutions about cooperation, human rights, trade and development. 3 resolutions.

1985 Measures to be taken against Nazi, Fascist and neo-Fascist activities .

1986 Calls on all governments (including the USA) to observe international law.

1986 Imposes economic and military sanctions against South Africa.

1986 Condemns Israel for its actions against Lebanese civilians.

1986 Calls on Israel to respect Muslim holy places.

1986 Condemns Israel for sky-jacking a Libyan airliner.

1986 Resolutions about cooperation, security, human rights, trade, media bias, the environment and development.
8 resolutions.

1987 Calls on Israel to abide by the Geneva Conventions in its treatment of the Palestinians.

1987 Calls on Israel to stop deporting Palestinians.

1987 Condemns Israel for its actions in Lebanon. 2 resolutions.

1987 Calls on Israel to withdraw its forces from Lebanon.

1987 Cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States.

1987 Calls for compliance in the International Court of Justice concerning military and paramilitary activities against Nicaragua and a call to end the trade embargo against Nicaragua. 2 resolutions.

1987 Measures to prevent international terrorism, study the underlying political and economic causes of terrorism, convene a conference to define terrorism and to differentiate it from the struggle of people from national liberation.

1987 Resolutions concerning journalism, international debt and trade. 3 resolutions.

1987 Opposition to the build up of weapons in space.

1987 Opposition to the development of new weapons of mass destruction.

1987 Opposition to nuclear testing. 2 resolutions.

1987 Proposal to set up South Atlantic "Zone of Peace".

1988 Condemns Israeli practices against Palestinians in the occupied territories. 5 resolutions (1988 and 1989).

1989 Condemns USA invasion of Panama.

1989 Condemns USA troops for ransacking the residence of the Nicaraguan ambassador in Panama.

1989 Condemns USA support for the Contra army in Nicaragua.

1989 Condemns illegal USA embargo of Nicaragua.

1989 Opposing the acquisition of territory by force.

1989 Calling for a resolution to the Arab-Israeli conflict based on earlier UN resolutions.

1990 To send three UN Security Council observers to the occupied territories.

1995 Affirms that land in East Jerusalem annexed by Israel is occupied territory.

1997 Calls on Israel to cease building settlements in East Jerusalem and other occupied territories. 2 resolutions.

1999 Calls on the USA to end its trade embargo on Cuba. 8 resolutions (1992 to 1999).

2001 To send unarmed monitors to the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.

2001 To set up the International Criminal Court.

2002 To renew the peace keeping mission in Bosnia.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-02-2012, 06:36 PM (This post was last modified: 11-02-2012 09:37 AM by Zat.)
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Not much interest in historical fact, it seems, but I promised you both 'diplomatic' and 'military' rap sheets.

So here is the second part.

FYI.


A Century at War

A list of US military interventions abroad during the last 100 years. There are 139 entries. I just copied the last 50 years below. It is amazing how a "peace-loving nation" as GW Bush called the US, managed to exercise its army outside her own borders. The list only goes to 2002 when I compiled the document.

IRAN
1946
Nuclear threat
Soviet troops told to leave north (Iranian Azerbaijan).

YUGOSLAVIA
1946
Naval
Response to shooting-down of U.S. plane.

URUGUAY
1947
Nuclear threat
Bombers deployed as show of strength.

GREECE
1947-49
Command operation
U.S. directs extreme-right in civil war.

CHINA
1948-49
Troops
Marines evacuate Americans before Communist victory.

GERMANY
1948
Nuclear threat
Atomic-capable bombers guard Berlin Airlift.

PHILIPPINES
1948-54
Command operation
CIA directs war against Huk Rebellion.

PUERTO RICO
1950
Command operation
Independence rebellion crushed in Ponce.

KOREA
1950-53
Troops, naval, bombing, nuclear threats
U.S.& South Korea fight China & North Korea to stalemate; A-bomb
threat in 1950, & vs. China in 1953. Still have bases.

IRAN
1953
Command operation
CIA overthrows democracy, installs Shah.

VIETNAM
1954
Nuclear threat
Bombs offered to French to use against siege.

GUATEMALA
1954
Command operation, bombing, nuclear threat CIA directs exile
invasion after new gov't nationalizes U.S. company lands;
bombers based in Nicaragua.

EGYPT
1956
Nuclear threat, troops
Soviets told to keep out of Suez crisis; MArines evacuate foreigners

LEBANON
1958
Troops, naval
Marine occupation against rebels.

IRAQ
1958
Nuclear threat
Iraq warned against invading Kuwait.

CHINA
1958
Nuclear threat
China told not to move on Taiwan isles.

PANAMA
1958
Troops
Flag protests erupt into confrontation.

VIETNAM
1960-75
Troops, naval, bombing, nuclear threats Fought South Vietnam
revolt & North Vietnam; 1-2 million killed in longest U.S. war;
atomic bomb threats in 1968 and 1969.

CUBA
1961
Command operation CIA-directed exile invasion fails.

GERMANY
1961
Nuclear threat Alert during Berlin Wall crisis.

CUBA
1962
Nuclear threat
Naval Blockade during missile crisis; near-war with USSR.

LAOS
1962
Command operation
Military buildup during guerrilla war.

PANAMA
1964
Troops
Panamanians shot for urging canal's return.

INDONESIA
1965
Command operation Million killed in CIA-assisted army coup.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
1965-66
Troops, bombing Marines land during election campaign.

GUATEMALA
1966-67
Command operation Green Berets intervene against rebels.

CAMBODIA
1969-75
Bombing, troops, naval Up to 2 million killed in decade of
bombing, starvation, and political chaos.

OMAN
1970
Command operation U.S. directs Iranian marine invasion.

LAOS
1971-73
Command operation, bombing U.S. directs South Vietnamese
invasion; "carpet-bombs" countryside.

MIDEAST
1973
Nuclear threat World-wide alert during Mideast War.

CHILE
1973
Command operation CIA-backed coup ousts elected marxist president.

CAMBODIA
1975
Troops, bombing Gas captured ship, 28 die in copter crash.

ANGOLA
1976-92
Command operation CIA assists South African-backed rebels.

IRAN
1980
Troops, nuclear threat, aborted bombing Raid to rescue Embassy
hostages; 8 troops die in copter-plane crash. Soviets warned
not to get involved in revolution.

LIBYA
1981
Naval jets Two Libyan jets shot down in maneuvers.

EL SALVADOR
1981-92
Command operation, troops Advisors, overflights aid anti-rebel
war, soldiers briefly involved in hostage clash.

NICARAGUA
1981-90
Command operation, naval CIA directs exile (Contra) invasions,
plants harbor mines against revolution.

LEBANON
1982-84
Naval, bombing, troops Marines expel PLO and back Phalangists,
Navy bombs and shells Muslim and Syrian positions.

HONDURAS
1983-89
Troops
Maneuvers help build bases near borders.

GRENADA
1983-84
Troops, bombing Invasion four years after revolution.

IRAN
1984
Jets
Two Iranian jets shot down over Persian Gulf.

LIBYA
1986
Bombing, naval Air strikes to topple nationalist gov't.

BOLIVIA
1986
Troops Army assists raids on cocaine region.

IRAN
1987-88
Naval, bombing US intervenes on side of Iraq in war.

LIBYA
1989
Naval jets Two Libyan jets shot down.

VIRGIN ISLANDS
1989
Troops
St. Croix Black unrest after storm.

PHILIPPINES
1989
Jets
Air cover provided for government against coup.

PANAMA
1989-90
Troops, bombing
Nationalist government ousted by 27,000 soldiers, leaders
arrested, 2000+ killed.

LIBERIA
1990
Troops
Foreigners evacuated during civil war.

SAUDI ARABIA
1990-91
Troops, jets Iraq countered after invading Kuwait; 540,000
troops also stationed in Oman, Qatar, Bahrain, UAE, Israel.

IRAQ
1990-?
Bombing, troops, naval Blockade of Iraqi and Jordanian ports,
air strikes; 200,000+ killed in invasion of Iraq and Kuwait;
no-fly zone over Kurdish north, Shiite south, large-scale
destruction of Iraqi military.

KUWAIT
1991
Naval, bombing, troops Kuwait royal family returned to throne.

SOMALIA
1992-94
Troops, naval, bombing U.S.-led United Nations occupation
during civil war; raids against one Mogadishu faction.

YUGOSLAVIA
1992-94
Naval
Nato blockade of Serbia and Montenegro.

BOSNIA
1993-95
Jets, bombing No-fly zone patrolled in civil war; downed jets,
bombed Serbs.

HAITI
1994-96
Troops, naval
Blockade against military government; troops restore President
Aristide to office three years after coup.

CROATIA
1995
Bombing
Krajina Serb airfields attacked before Croatian offensive.

ZAIRE (CONGO)
1996-97
Troops
Marines at Rwandan Hutu refuge camps, in area where Congo
revolution begins.

LIBERIA
1997
Troops
Soldiers under fire during evacuation of foreigners.

ALBANIA
1997
Troops
Soldiers under fire during evacuation of foreigners.

SUDAN
1998
Missiles
Attack on pharmaceutical plant alleged to be "terrorist" nerve gas plant.

AFGHANISTAN
1998
Missiles
Attack on former CIA training camps used by Islamic
fundamentalist groups alleged to have attacked embassies.

IRAQ
1998-?
Bombing, Missiles
Four days of intensive air strikes after weapons inspectors
allege Iraqi obstructions.

YUGOSLAVIA
1999-?
Bombing, Missiles
Heavy NATO air strikes after Serbia declines to withdraw from Kosovo.

MACEDONIA
2001
Troops
NATO troops shift and partially disarm Albanian rebels.

AFGHANISTAN
2001
Massive U.S. mobilization to attack Taliban, Bin Laden. War
could expand to Iraq, Sudan, and beyond.

Here's a list of the countries that the U.S. has bombed since the end of World War II, compiled by historian William Blum:

China 1945-46
Korea 1950-53
China 1950-53
Guatemala 1954
Indonesia 1958
Cuba 1959-60
Guatemala 1960
Congo 1964
Peru 1965
Laos 1964-73
Vietnam 1961-73
Cambodia 1969-70
Guatemala 1967-69
Grenada 1983
Libya 1986
El Salvador 1980s
Nicaragua 1980s
Panama 1989
Iraq 1991-99
Sudan 1998
Afghanistan 1998
Yugoslavia 1999
Afghanistan 2001-
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-02-2012, 08:30 PM
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Because I've never seen this sort of list of vetos, by way of comparison, can we see the list of the other nations with Veto power? And perhaps a list of military action by those same nations?

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-02-2012, 08:35 PM (This post was last modified: 10-02-2012 08:46 PM by Zat.)
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Go right ahead, Erxomai, I am sure Google will be great help in your research. Big Grin

Then, by all means, share it with us.

You don't want me to do all the work, do you? Big Grin

PS. I never said that the US was the only culprit. However, being the current and only superpower with over a hundred military bases all over the world, they occupy a prominent position at the moment.

I thought American citizens ought to be aware of what their country has been up to during the last 50 years. Huh
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-02-2012, 09:12 PM
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
(10-02-2012 08:35 PM)Zat Wrote:  Go right ahead, Erxomai, I am sure Google will be great help in your research. Big Grin

Then, by all means, share it with us.

You don't want me to do all the work, do you? Big Grin

PS. I never said that the US was the only culprit. However, being the current and only superpower with over a hundred military bases all over the world, they occupy a prominent position at the moment.

I thought American citizens ought to be aware of what their country has been up to during the last 50 years. Huh

Not asking you to do my work. Was wondering if you had done your work.
My assumption is you're probably correct in your accusations, implied or otherwise. But, as a skeptic, I have to wonder if others approach the same level of "horror."

Since it's you're saw horse and not mine, I'm going to go put my head back in my US sand.

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
10-02-2012, 09:39 PM (This post was last modified: 10-02-2012 09:43 PM by Zat.)
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
(10-02-2012 09:12 PM)Erxomai Wrote:  Since it's you're saw horse and not mine, I'm going to go put my head back in my US sand.

It's not my saw horse (whatever that means). I am not an American, I don't need to know all these things about your country.

You do. Undecided
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
11-02-2012, 06:42 AM
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Just to make sure I am not unfairly accused of being "anti-American" I have to emphasize that I am not.

I am anti-Empire.

If we study history and search for the common elements in the many, many human civilizations over the centuries, we can easily find what has been a constant all along. In a way, history can be viewed as an ongoing sequence of empires.

In all the chaos of conflicting interests of first millions, then billions, of human beings, thousands and thousands of tribes, alliances, interest groups, nations, there always were a few that were stronger than all the others. Once these powerful interests reached critical mass and stability then they started to grow and dominate more and more of the world around them.

The Egyptians, Greek, Romans, Christians, Turks, Hapsburgs, French, German, Russian and, finally the Americans, all rose to power, peaked and then declined.

Looking at history in a different way, we can say that two major human emotions dominated all through the centuries: desire to pursue unrestricted self interest on one hand; desire for justice on the other. The first desire manifested itself as search for wealth and power, the second pursued democracy, co-operation, consensus-building.

Those who wanted freedom to act according to their perceived self interest almost always supported the current empire. Those who wanted justice almost always rebelled, almost always fought the empire.

And so is our world at present, at the dawn of the 21st century.

On the one hand, there is the status quo, the entrenched power and wealth represented by the empire, on the other hand there are the have-nots who find the arrangement unjust. So the fight goes on, like it always has, ever, in human history.

And this precarious balance between the warring factions has kept humanity going, over the centuries. Never quite fair and just, never quite enslaved.

Because, my friends, there is no Utopia in the script of the human story. There is an ongoing, never ending fight to protect whatever justice we rebels managed to wrest from those who want it all their way. The balance keeps tilting back and forth between the warring factions and our lives are tied to this mad rollercoaster, going up toward optimism, or plunging down towards despair.

Every now and then however, the plunge seems deeper and steeper than ever before as if it would never stop, and then we get scared. We feel that the automatic checks and balances don't work any more and things may be out of control. This is when people usually wake up from their comfortable complacency and feel they have to do something about it.

We are living in such a time now, realizing that the gloves are off and naked brutality and greed has taken over.

This is the time when people, who never cared about politics before, take up the placards and swarm out onto the streets in our millions.

This is the time when lies don't work any more and our illusions of freedom, democracy, free press, justice, peace, cooperation and fairness suddenly evaporate and we see our rulers for what they are: corrupt, greedy, brutal, sneaking and lying bullies who can't ever have enough.

Unfortunately, there is another element of the puzzle. It is technology. As the thousands of scientists, tens of thousands of engineers and millions of workers and technicians sold their talent into the servitude of the empire - deadlier and deadlier weapons were forged and amassed. First time in history, there is enough power available to destroy the world and end the human story.

Now we start waking up to the terrible danger that this power may have fallen into the hands of those who are not afraid to use it, at any cost, to force their will on the human family.

So, we feel that this crisis is not just one more of the same, of those crises that we have known all our lives. This is different. The world has been nudged out of its groove and is on the move -- somewhere. Now we face terrible dangers.

If we woke up in time, then there are great opportunities to make the world a better place.

If not, we have a big problem.

Undecided
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Zat's post
12-02-2012, 11:09 AM
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Looks like I am the only contributor to this thread, compiling information on US Foreign Policy.

So be it.

The following data was compiled back in 2001 and some of the links may not exist any more.

However, the quoted facts are all on record.

American non-cooperation with the International Community

Whether or not the U.S. cooperates and compromises with other nations largely determines whether the United Nations can succeed in its mission of promoting global equality, development, and peace.

How has the U.S. used its influence? It has tried to establish a double standard for international rules, seeking condemnation of its enemies, but endeavoring to exempt itself and its allies from any UN scrutiny. It portrays itself as a world leader in human rights and environmental issues, yet has failed to sign or ratify many of the major treaties or "conventions" addressing these concerns. When new conventions are under negotiation, the U.S. is among the most obstructive countries, waging a continual diplomatic war for exemption from international standards.

Here is a look at a few of the many UN multinational treaties that the U.S. has refused to sign or ratify.

WOMEN

- Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: CEDAW is an international bill of rights for women. The U.S., Afghanistan and Sao Tome & Principe are the only three countries that have signed but not ratified this convention (signed by the U.S. 17 July 1980). http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/e1cedaw.htm

- Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage and Registration of Marriages: signed by the U.S. 10 December 1962, but not ratified. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/63.htm

- Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others: A June 2002 U.S. State Department report on trafficking criticized several U.S. allies for doing too little to combat it, but the U.S. has not signed this treaty. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/33.htm

ENVIRONMENT


- The Bush administration has downplayed the risks of global warming and refused to ratify the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change on the grounds that it would damage the U.S. economy. The U.S. is the world's largest producer of greenhouse gases.

- Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants: Only after strong pressure from environmental groups did the U.S. sign this treaty to reduce and/or eliminate releases of chemicals harmful to human and the environment, like industrial products and byproducts. Signed by the U.S. 23 May 2001, but not ratified. http://www.chem.unep.ch/sc/documents/con...ext_en.pdf or http://www.chem.unep.ch/so/

- Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal: signed by the U.S. 22 March 1990, but not ratified. http://unfccc.int/resource/convkp.html

- Convention on Biological Diversity: signed by the U.S. 4 June 1993, but not ratified. http://www.biodiv.org/doc/legal/cbd-en.pdf

- Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes: not signed by the U.S. http://www.unece.org/env/water/text/water/

- Statutes of the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotech-nology:not signed by the U.S. http://www.icgeb.trieste.it/GENERAL/Statutes_ICGEB.pdf

- The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea: not signed by the U.S. http://www.un.org/Depts/los/convention_a...osindx.htm

DISARMAMENT

- Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty: This treaty bans all forms of nuclear weapons testing, but it will not go into force until ratified by all 44 countries with nuclear weapons or facilities. As of summer 2002, 165 nations had signed the treaty and 93 had ratified it, including 31 of the 44 key nations. Signed by the U.S. 24 September 1996, but not ratified. http://disarmament.un.org/TreatyStatus.nsf/

- Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on their Destruction: Also known as the Ottawa Treaty, this convention is a crucial tool of the international movement against landmines. One hundred and twenty-five states are party to this Convention by ratification, accession or approval. The U.S. opposes it, along with North Korea, Iran and Iraq (those countries labeled as an "axis of evil" by President Bush), among others. Not signed by the U.S. http://www.unog.ch/frames/disarm/distreat/ottawa.htm

- International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries: not signed by the U.S. http://www.un.org/documents/ga/res/44/a44r034.htm

- International Convention for the Suppression of Terrorist Bombings: signed by the U.S: 12 January 1998, but not ratified until 26 June 2002. http://untreaty.un.org/English/Terrorism/Conv11.pdf

- International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism: signed by the U.S. 10 January 2000 but not ratified until 26 June 2002. http://untreaty.un.org/English/Terrorism/Conv12.pdf

HUMAN RIGHTS

- Convention on the Rights of the Child: The CRC is the most widely and rapidly ratified human rights treaty in history, with 191 participating nations. The only two non-ratifying countries are the U.S. and Somalia, which lacks a functioning government. Signed by the U.S. 16 February 1995, but not ratified. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/k2crc.htm

- Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict: signed by the U.S. 5 July 2000, but not ratified. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu2/6/protocolchild.htm

- Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography: signed by the U.S. 5 July 2000, but not ratified. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu2/dopchild.htm

- International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: signed by the U.S. 5 October 1977, but not ratified. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/a_cescr.htm

- Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Aiming at the Abolition of the Death Penalty: not signed by the U.S. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/a_opt2.htm

- International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid: not signed by the U.S. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/11.htm

WHEN TIME TO TALK, U.S. PREFERS TO WALK

- The U.S. left the UN International Conference on Racism, officially because of heavy criticism aimed at Israel. A conference debate on racism in U.S. society and demands for compensation for slavery may have provided additional reasons for the U.S. decision. Nations rarely walk out of debates opting instead to enter reservations in keeping with accepted diplomatic norms for recording dissent.

http://www.unfoundation.org/unwire/util/ display_stories.asp?objid=17592ECONOMY/LABOR

- Of the eight core UN conventions relating to work and the International Labour Organization, the U.S. has ratified two. This places the country level with China, Armenia, Burma and Oman, and behind Afghanistan, Qatar, Somalia and Vietnam, which have each signed three. http://ilolex.ilo.ch:1567/english/ docs/declworld.htm

Among the labor related treaties the U.S. has not ratified:

- Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organize Convention: http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/j_ilo87.htm

- Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining Convention: http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/j_ilo98.htm

- Convention concerning Minimum Age for Admission to Employment: http://ilolex.ilo.ch:1567/scripts/convde.pl?C138

JUSTICE

- Since 1945, the International Court of Justice in The Hague has been a forum for settling disputes between states. On 7 October 1985, the U.S. declared it would no longer abide by the court's decisions and terminated its agreement to the Declaration Recognizing as Compulsory the Jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice, which it had signed on 26 August 1946.

- Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court: The ICC is a permanent court for prosecution of individuals on war crimes, such as genocide and crimes against humanity, that were previously handled by temporary tribunals. The U.S. and most of its allies signed the treaty, but in an unprecedented action, the U.S. declared 6 May 2002 that it no longer considered itself bound by it, claiming the court might try American citizens on 'frivolous' charges. Signed by the U.S. 31 December 2000; "unsigned" by the U.S. 6 May 2002. http://www.un.org/law/icc/statute/romefra.htm

- Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties: This codification of the legal framework for international treaties and the resolution of conflicts over treaties is central for the functioning of international law. Signed by the U.S. 24 April 1970, but not ratified. http://www.un.org/law/ilc/texts/treaties.htm

- Convention on the Non-Applicability of Statutory Limitations to War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity: not signed by the U.S. http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/p_limit.htm

- United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime: signed by the U.S. 13 December 2000, but not ratified. http://www.uncjin.org/Documents/Conventi...s/383e.pdf

Researched by Edward Andersson, Matebello Matloung and Rebecca Worner
http://www.wedo.org/wssd/neglect.htm
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
12-02-2012, 11:14 AM
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
Thanks for this thread, Zat. You have revealed to me at last how evil America is. Since there are no other nations doing bad things out there, and since you seem to know it all, will you please you tell me which one is least egregious so I can apply for immigration status?
Thank you in advance for your help.

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Erxomai's post
12-02-2012, 11:20 AM
RE: US Foreign Policy -- Diplomatic and Military
(12-02-2012 11:14 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  Thanks for this thread, Zat. You have revealed to me at last how evil America is. Since there are no other nations doing bad things out there, and since you seem to know it all, will you please you tell me which one is least egregious so I can apply for immigration status?
Thank you in advance for your help.

Erxomai, you are just being silly.

Also, putting things in my mouth that I have never said. It is not fair.

I made it clear in Post #7 that I am not anti-American, only anti-Empire.

Your loyalty to your own country is admirable but it does not justify blindness and blanket forgiveness.

It is not the American people who are at fault here but rather the industrial-military complex that Eisenhower warned against and the top level leadership that wants an Empire (as Dick Cheney openly boasted about).
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Zat's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: