Understanding the Allegory of the Cave.
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03-06-2015, 02:50 PM
RE: Understanding the Allegory of the Cave.
(02-06-2015 05:20 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(02-06-2015 03:25 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  Yep that's it.

Well, I can't write a 40 minute speech for you (Tongue) but I think this outline might help:

You can start by saying that the ascent represents the path to knowledge and wisdom.

-Philosophers are the ones who, according to Plato, are brave enough to face the truth.
-It is an ascent, rather than a descent, because it is symbolic of an ascension of the mind, the higher place on which the philosopher stands with his acquired knowledge, but also of Plato's "world of forms", the unchanging, eternal, real world.
-The path is hard to follow, because it's painful for one to accept that they've been living an illusion and seek the truth. The philosopher himself would be hesitant at first and this sudden realization that there's more to the world than he thought would shock him.
-The prisoners (the simple people) are ignorant of the reality outside of the cave because they have not pondered questions about life and the world like philosophers do. They have no been educated in order to do so.
-The more his eyes are adjusted, the more he learns. The more he ponders philosophical questions, the easier it is for him to accept the truth and the more open-minded he becomes.
-The real world that the philosopher experiences matches the world of forms, the origin of all ideas, shapes and souls (all that is immaterial) according to Plato.
-He has to go back to the "fake", material world, because he feels it is his duty to let other people know about this true world, just as philosophers feel that their knowledge mainly serves the rest of the world more than themselves.
-The philosopher will often say things that sound crazy or surreal to simple people, thus is the blindness explained. People won't pursue philosophy, because they see its effects as harmful. That is, of course, only because they cannot understand without seeing the light (pursuing philosophy) themselves.
-No matter how hard or painful, philosophers must seek truth at all costs and try to educate others so they can see the light themselves. Most people won't turn around to look at the light themselves, so someone has to guide them.


The bold parts are relevant to the "how it is achieved" part. Add some education in there, philosophy, and of course the dialectic method.

Thanks, you helped a lot, I had my exam today Smile I think I did well on that question. The second one was on pre-Socratic philosophers and my main issue with them is always mixing their flipping names up! Ancient Greek names are so hard to remember >.<

Saints live in flames; wise men, next to them.
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03-06-2015, 05:21 PM
RE: Understanding the Allegory of the Cave.
Is this thread a good enough excuse for a little Pythonarus?




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04-06-2015, 01:34 AM
RE: Understanding the Allegory of the Cave.
(03-06-2015 02:50 PM)SunnyD1 Wrote:  Thanks, you helped a lot, I had my exam today Smile I think I did well on that question. The second one was on pre-Socratic philosophers and my main issue with them is always mixing their flipping names up! Ancient Greek names are so hard to remember >.<

No problem, I'm glad I could help Smile

Don't worry, I'm a Greek with an interest in ancient Greek philosophy who has studied about it a lot throughout school and uni and even I have trouble telling them apart sometimes Tongue

"Behind every great pirate, there is a great butt."
-Guybrush Threepwood-
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