Unitarian Universalist question
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
02-06-2013, 06:22 AM
Unitarian Universalist question
I recently went to a child's naming ceremony at a Unitarian Universalist church here in NY. I admit I was impressed. It was free of sin/guilt removal. I spoke to the minister after the ceremony and liked what she said. She mentioned that some of the members are atheists. I have never had contact with this church and came away with a positive feeling. I looked on their site and found it free of offensive crap. I doubt ill go back because, on some level, it felt like a religious ceremony. Has anyone come into contact with Unitarian Universalists? I wonder if anyone had a similar experience? Am I missing the negative aspect of UU? Thanks
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-06-2013, 07:29 AM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
I attended one service. At the time I was having doubts, my husband is a believer so we were trying to find something that would be 'churchy' happy medium.

It was warm and welcoming, and I probably would have gone back had they not had an early sunday morning service all the way across town. Having 2 little kids-it was just too much work to get us all up & out early on a sunday morning.

Some people feel the need to belong to a structured group for various reasons. UU's are open to many views. To me: they took the good parts of many faiths and toss the rest.


"Life is a daring adventure or it is nothing"--Helen Keller
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-06-2013, 07:44 AM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
I'm reminded of a common joke about these guys:

What do you get when you cross a Unitarian with a Jehovah's Witness?
A person who knocks at your door for no reason at all.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like BryanS's post
02-06-2013, 07:45 AM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
I sometimes attend a UU congregation here in my community. It is really the only place I have where I can discuss religion other than Christianity. For me, it has been very welcome, and honestly was the catalyst that pushed me to more open thinking. Several members of our congregation are atheists. I like that the 7 principals of Unitarian Universalism line up so closely with the core values of social work, and the strong focus on social justice work is one of the things that kept me coming back.

In a way, it is a religious organization/ceremony, but I am comfortable there. I miss the sense of community that came with regularly attending church when I was a Christian, and this has been a good fit for me.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes socialworkersally's post
02-06-2013, 08:10 AM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
Unitarians get rid of all that old outmoded religious guilt.

So they always have something modern and up to date to feel guilty about.

Nonsense is nonsense, but the history of nonsense is a very important science.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-06-2013, 08:30 AM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
I have not been, but am amazed that there actually exists one in Jackson, Mississippi. I may try it sometime.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-06-2013, 09:55 AM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
Speaking as a UU...

The whole place is under rules of religious cease-fire. Mutual tolerance and respect is the watchword. You won't be harangued or criticized by the Christians there (about 22% of the total organization, IIRC, second only to atheists/agnostics), but the "catch" is that you can't go around criticizing the Christians there (who tend to be in the non-literalist, liberal-religion, positive social activism category, and thus avoid most of the criticisms one would direct at Christians anyway). Wish society operated like that more.

Same goes for woo. No real woo in the traditions or ceremonies, but you've got quite a few crystal-wavers who turn up here because they've got nowhere else to turn up. You may politely make clear that you don't believe, but don't go for the jugular.

Here's a joke I heard in my first year. "Why are UU's such bad singers?" "Because they're actually reading two lines ahead to see if they agree with the lyrics." Too true. Lots of references to God in the hymnal, some songs from other traditions. My first minister suggested that I "try it out", as a way to understand the originating faith of the song, and no one would think I was really believing it myself. Still took me a year or two to sing them without vetting them first.

I call it a buffet table religion. You get all the positive benefits of a church (including community, support net, and framework for charitable action), and instead of serving out one main dish of dogma, you get a buffet, and can pick and choose from or turn your nose up at every tray on table. (And if you're a hardcore atheist, there's also a lot of examination of Science.) If two people have different dishes, it's just natural, and not a subject for hatred.

Religious education is nice. Kids learn ABOUT religions, but aren't told this is true or that is false. The expectation is that they'll eventually make up their own minds. UU kids tend to do a bit of religious experimentation once they hit teens/adulthood, but not go for the hardcore hating faiths.

There's a very strong culture of social liberalism and progressivism. It's not anything official, but if you're socially conservative you might find it more than a bit stifling. (If you're a hippy or a green, you'll feel right at home.)

The biggest danger is getting sucked into the politics of congregational management. Forget all the official ways and means and procedures. (Well, don't, they're important, but.) Here's how every position save minister is ACTUALLY filled. A race is held, and the position goes to whomever runs away the slowest. Bring your sneakers.

(02-06-2013 08:10 AM)Abdul Alhazred Wrote:  Unitarians get rid of all that old outmoded religious guilt.

So they always have something modern and up to date to feel guilty about.

LoL

"If I ignore the alternatives, the only option is God; I ignore them; therefore God." -- The Syllogism of Fail
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Reltzik's post
02-06-2013, 04:55 PM
RE: Unitarian Universalist question
Unitarian Universalism accepts people of all faiths and of no faith. Their doctrine is not about any one deity, but about a search for truth wherever that search may lead. My wife and I were married by a Unitarian Universalist minister because we are from different religious backgrounds. Neither of us were practicing our original religions at the time and the minister was more to appease our families than anything. However, beginning with our first child, we began attending the Unitarian Universalist services because we want our kids to be exposed to many ideas so they can intelligently make up their own minds about religion. We still attend the weekly services although I haven't personally attended for about a year now (no time - I'm training to run a marathon, but that's another story).

For anyone that misses the social aspects of religion, but doesn't want the religion itself, it's not a bad way to go. The downside is you do hear religious references from time to time especially around the important holidays from various religions.

"Religion has caused more misery to all of mankind in every stage of human history than any other single idea." --Madalyn Murray O'Hair
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Impulse's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: