Upward mobility
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23-07-2013, 12:01 PM
Upward mobility
I heard about this on NPR this morning. It is a study by 3 economists who are studying upward mobility (that is, the ability for people in lower classes to move upward) across the US, and they found some interesting results.

The article here

The map below (darker colors mean less mobility)
[Image: 0723_mobilitymap.gif]

A link to Raj Chetty's site

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23-07-2013, 12:04 PM
RE: Upward mobility
Interesting that the majority of Republicans and Libertarians live in the darker areas on the map. Drinking Beverage

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23-07-2013, 12:09 PM
RE: Upward mobility
but the Midwest is quite mobile. The study seems to indicate that there are several factors that correlate with increased upward mobility

-Increased integration between families of different income levels
-This improves the overall education quality for low-income students in integrated areas
-Less retention of wealth at the top
-community and/or church organization and attendance
-two-parent households (this seems to be a community effect too, as a kid in a two-parent household in an area of mainly single parents, is no more likely to succeed)


I thought it was very fascinating that they didn't find a strong effect by race. That is to say, white people in areas of low mobility, are no more likely to move up. But areas appear to be lower mobility where segregation was a bigger issue for longer.

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23-07-2013, 12:39 PM (This post was last modified: 23-07-2013 12:42 PM by Logica Humano.)
RE: Upward mobility
(23-07-2013 12:09 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  but the Midwest is quite mobile. The study seems to indicate that there are several factors that correlate with increased upward mobility

Having lived in the Midwest as well as having family there, I actually find that the average person there is a lot more moderate than they like to think they are, especially the northern end. The closer one gets to the larger centers of right wing advocates, the darker the shades get. I'm not saying their views necessarily effect their environment, I am saying that their environment shapes their views like that.

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23-07-2013, 12:39 PM
RE: Upward mobility
The point they made is that there was no strong correlation between mobility and whether the state was red or blue.

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23-07-2013, 12:49 PM
RE: Upward mobility
[Image: 350px-Red_state,_blue_state.svg.png]

It depends more on population density, yes.

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23-07-2013, 12:55 PM
RE: Upward mobility
It doesn't look to be very strongly correlated with population density either. Looks like most the rural south is not very mobile either. But California is.

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23-07-2013, 02:17 PM
RE: Upward mobility
(23-07-2013 12:55 PM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  It doesn't look to be very strongly correlated with population density either. Looks like most the rural south is not very mobile either. But California is.

Hm, perhaps. Consider
[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQUBF3BCIs4HeLGHlHf48L...0wW1Xwa-JB]

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23-07-2013, 02:18 PM
RE: Upward mobility
And Oregon and Washington and southeast Georgia, Arkansas, etc.

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