Use of the word "science"
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04-07-2014, 04:03 PM
Use of the word "science"
Here's a very simplistic and perhaps silly thought I had recently.

The word "science" is commonly used in English-speaking countries to talk about school subjects such as math, physics and chemistry.

This doesn't happen in Greece, and the word "science" in a school would sound silly here. The word seems to only apply to guys in lab coats.

Do you think the common use of the word for the specific field of sciences that involve math (as if there are no social or political sciences for example) in English-speaking countries affect the way people think about science and consequently their interest in it?

How about people from other countries and different languages? How is it for you?

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04-07-2014, 09:19 PM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(04-07-2014 04:03 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  Here's a very simplistic and perhaps silly thought I had recently.

The word "science" is commonly used in English-speaking countries to talk about school subjects such as math, physics and chemistry.

This doesn't happen in Greece, and the word "science" in a school would sound silly here. The word seems to only apply to guys in lab coats.

Do you think the common use of the word for the specific field of sciences that involve math (as if there are no social or political sciences for example) in English-speaking countries affect the way people think about science and consequently their interest in it?

How about people from other countries and different languages? How is it for you?

sci·ence [sahy-uhns]
1.
a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws: the mathematical sciences.
2.
systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.
3.
any of the branches of natural or physical science.
4.
systematized knowledge in general.
5.
knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/science

Also science meaning guy in lab coat is a stereotype. Laugh out load

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04-07-2014, 09:23 PM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(04-07-2014 09:19 PM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  
(04-07-2014 04:03 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  Here's a very simplistic and perhaps silly thought I had recently.

The word "science" is commonly used in English-speaking countries to talk about school subjects such as math, physics and chemistry.

This doesn't happen in Greece, and the word "science" in a school would sound silly here. The word seems to only apply to guys in lab coats.

Do you think the common use of the word for the specific field of sciences that involve math (as if there are no social or political sciences for example) in English-speaking countries affect the way people think about science and consequently their interest in it?

How about people from other countries and different languages? How is it for you?

sci·ence [sahy-uhns]
1.
a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws: the mathematical sciences.
2.
systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.
3.
any of the branches of natural or physical science.
4.
systematized knowledge in general.
5.
knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/science

Also science meaning guy in lab coat is a stereotype. Laugh out load

Well, I think you nailed it.
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04-07-2014, 09:27 PM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(04-07-2014 09:23 PM)Rinpoche Wrote:  
(04-07-2014 09:19 PM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  sci·ence [sahy-uhns]
1.
a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws: the mathematical sciences.
2.
systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.
3.
any of the branches of natural or physical science.
4.
systematized knowledge in general.
5.
knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/science

Also science meaning guy in lab coat is a stereotype. Laugh out load

Well, I think you nailed it.

I think I only gave a very poor but understandable example.

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04-07-2014, 09:33 PM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(04-07-2014 09:27 PM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  
(04-07-2014 09:23 PM)Rinpoche Wrote:  Well, I think you nailed it.

I think I only gave a very poor but understandable example.

Dictionary.com's fine, but I prefer Oxford Dictionaries:

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05-07-2014, 02:38 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(04-07-2014 09:19 PM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  
(04-07-2014 04:03 PM)undergroundp Wrote:  Here's a very simplistic and perhaps silly thought I had recently.

The word "science" is commonly used in English-speaking countries to talk about school subjects such as math, physics and chemistry.

This doesn't happen in Greece, and the word "science" in a school would sound silly here. The word seems to only apply to guys in lab coats.

Do you think the common use of the word for the specific field of sciences that involve math (as if there are no social or political sciences for example) in English-speaking countries affect the way people think about science and consequently their interest in it?

How about people from other countries and different languages? How is it for you?

sci·ence [sahy-uhns]
1.
a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws: the mathematical sciences.
2.
systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.
3.
any of the branches of natural or physical science.
4.
systematized knowledge in general.
5.
knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/science

Also science meaning guy in lab coat is a stereotype. Laugh out load

I wasn't asking about the definition of science, I was asking about the common use of the word. Did you even read my post?

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05-07-2014, 06:43 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 02:38 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(04-07-2014 09:19 PM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  sci·ence [sahy-uhns]
1.
a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws: the mathematical sciences.
2.
systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.
3.
any of the branches of natural or physical science.
4.
systematized knowledge in general.
5.
knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/science

Also science meaning guy in lab coat is a stereotype. Laugh out load

I wasn't asking about the definition of science, I was asking about the common use of the word. Did you even read my post?

Facepalm How could I have not noticed that?

I gave the definition thinking that it would help but it did not so please let me try again.

The use of the word usually comes down to a study. For example zoology is science that is the study of animals, psychology is the study of human mentality. Science is even used for no scientific points as the definition also means knowledge. Here there is a show called sports science. Sometimes the word is taken out of context, like when someone says creation "science". So in short science in the common use is use is to show something in which is(or at least supposed to) a body of knowledge.

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05-07-2014, 09:09 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 06:43 AM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 02:38 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  I wasn't asking about the definition of science, I was asking about the common use of the word. Did you even read my post?

Facepalm How could I have not noticed that?

I gave the definition thinking that it would help but it did not so please let me try again.

The use of the word usually comes down to a study. For example zoology is science that is the study of animals, psychology is the study of human mentality. Science is even used for no scientific points as the definition also means knowledge. Here there is a show called sports science. Sometimes the word is taken out of context, like when someone says creation "science". So in short science in the common use is use is to show something in which is(or at least supposed to) a body of knowledge.

Again, I didn't ask how the word is used, I just wondered about its specific common use in schools and if it affects the way people view science.

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05-07-2014, 09:12 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
In one sense it refers to empirical skepticism as a mindset. That's really not the usual usage.

I don't know about other languages, but in English we make very little distinction between learning about something, and doing that thing. So, the school classes for learning fundamentals and the active research of professionals are both "science".

It's basically never applied to maths, though.

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05-07-2014, 09:24 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 09:09 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 06:43 AM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  Facepalm How could I have not noticed that?

I gave the definition thinking that it would help but it did not so please let me try again.

The use of the word usually comes down to a study. For example zoology is science that is the study of animals, psychology is the study of human mentality. Science is even used for no scientific points as the definition also means knowledge. Here there is a show called sports science. Sometimes the word is taken out of context, like when someone says creation "science". So in short science in the common use is use is to show something in which is(or at least supposed to) a body of knowledge.

Again, I didn't ask how the word is used, I just wondered about its specific common use in schools and if it affects the way people view science.

It is used as a categorical word like Art or Music. Honestly the problem is not in the language but in the poor quality of education in grammar-high school of science. Same is true with history most of what is taught in school is wrong or so woefully incomplete that it may as well be wrong. To use Evolution as an example the way it is taught in high school (or at least was done so for me and I went through one of the top school systems in the country) was so simplified and glossed over that the true nature of how it works was distorted. It is the same with history we are taught that Columbus was going to prove the world was round and that is a lie. A popular lie written by America's first great author in his book The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus by Washington Irving instead of the fact that the Globe was invented the same year Columbus set sail.

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