Use of the word "science"
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05-07-2014, 09:47 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 09:09 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 06:43 AM)Metazoa Zeke Wrote:  Facepalm How could I have not noticed that?

I gave the definition thinking that it would help but it did not so please let me try again.

The use of the word usually comes down to a study. For example zoology is science that is the study of animals, psychology is the study of human mentality. Science is even used for no scientific points as the definition also means knowledge. Here there is a show called sports science. Sometimes the word is taken out of context, like when someone says creation "science". So in short science in the common use is use is to show something in which is(or at least supposed to) a body of knowledge.

Again, I didn't ask how the word is used, I just wondered about its specific common use in schools and if it affects the way people view science.

Facepalm I got to stop failing. In schools(well at least here) it is commonly used for subjects like biology,chemistry, and physics. So science is basically the knowledge of the world out side of humans in school.

For impact on people it depends. If the class was easy and fun than they leave with an good impact, if it is hard and boring people leave with a bad impact.

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05-07-2014, 09:58 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 09:24 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is used as a categorical word like Art or Music. Honestly the problem is not in the language but in the poor quality of education in grammar-high school of science. Same is true with history most of what is taught in school is wrong or so woefully incomplete that it may as well be wrong. To use Evolution as an example the way it is taught in high school (or at least was done so for me and I went through one of the top school systems in the country) was so simplified and glossed over that the true nature of how it works was distorted. It is the same with history we are taught that Columbus was going to prove the world was round and that is a lie. A popular lie written by America's first great author in his book The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus by Washington Irving instead of the fact that the Globe was invented the same year Columbus set sail.

It's just that I've seen many teenagers or even kids talk about school and saying they like or don't like "science" in school. How can that not affect the way they view science when they leave school?

The word "science" is never even mentioned in schools here and as I said, we only relate it to guys in lab coats as kids. When I was a kid, if you asked me if I'm interested in science, I wouldn't think about school, but an American kid may.

Is a bit more clear now? Tongue

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05-07-2014, 10:08 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 09:58 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 09:24 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  It is used as a categorical word like Art or Music. Honestly the problem is not in the language but in the poor quality of education in grammar-high school of science. Same is true with history most of what is taught in school is wrong or so woefully incomplete that it may as well be wrong. To use Evolution as an example the way it is taught in high school (or at least was done so for me and I went through one of the top school systems in the country) was so simplified and glossed over that the true nature of how it works was distorted. It is the same with history we are taught that Columbus was going to prove the world was round and that is a lie. A popular lie written by America's first great author in his book The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus by Washington Irving instead of the fact that the Globe was invented the same year Columbus set sail.

It's just that I've seen many teenagers or even kids talk about school and saying they like or don't like "science" in school. How can that not affect the way they view science when they leave school?

The word "science" is never even mentioned in schools here and as I said, we only relate it to guys in lab coats as kids. When I was a kid, if you asked me if I'm interested in science, I wouldn't think about school, but an American kid may.

Is a bit more clear now? Tongue

Same can be said for Math. I'm not entirely sure what you are asking here.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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05-07-2014, 10:30 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 10:08 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 09:58 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  It's just that I've seen many teenagers or even kids talk about school and saying they like or don't like "science" in school. How can that not affect the way they view science when they leave school?

The word "science" is never even mentioned in schools here and as I said, we only relate it to guys in lab coats as kids. When I was a kid, if you asked me if I'm interested in science, I wouldn't think about school, but an American kid may.

Is a bit more clear now? Tongue

Same can be said for Math. I'm not entirely sure what you are asking here.

Alright, I'll try to make it even simpler, at the risk of sounding ridiculous Rolleyes

You ask a Greek kid if he likes science. The kid will think about lab coats.
You ask a Greek 18 year old if he likes science. He won't think about lab coats, but he won't think about physics and chemistry either.

You ask an American kid if he likes science. The kid will probably think about school.
You ask an American 18 year old if he likes science. Will he still be thinking about school? About physics and chemistry?

Does the association of the word "science" with school subjects make science less interesting to kids in English speaking countries? That's pretty much what I'm asking.

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05-07-2014, 10:41 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 10:30 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 10:08 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Same can be said for Math. I'm not entirely sure what you are asking here.

Alright, I'll try to make it even simpler, at the risk of sounding ridiculous Rolleyes

You ask a Greek kid if he likes science. The kid will think about lab coats.
You ask a Greek 18 year old if he likes science. He won't think about lab coats, but he won't think about physics and chemistry either.

You ask an American kid if he likes science. The kid will probably think about school.
You ask an American 18 year old if he likes science. Will he still be thinking about school? About physics and chemistry?

Does the association of the word "science" with school subjects make science less interesting to kids in English speaking countries? That's pretty much what I'm asking.

Well considering the disproportionate contributions from English speaking countries to the advancement of science over the last few centuries I would be hesitant to go with your hypothesis. I don't think there have any link to be honest.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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05-07-2014, 10:52 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 10:41 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 10:30 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  Alright, I'll try to make it even simpler, at the risk of sounding ridiculous Rolleyes

You ask a Greek kid if he likes science. The kid will think about lab coats.
You ask a Greek 18 year old if he likes science. He won't think about lab coats, but he won't think about physics and chemistry either.

You ask an American kid if he likes science. The kid will probably think about school.
You ask an American 18 year old if he likes science. Will he still be thinking about school? About physics and chemistry?

Does the association of the word "science" with school subjects make science less interesting to kids in English speaking countries? That's pretty much what I'm asking.

Well considering the disproportionate contributions from English speaking countries to the advancement of science over the last few centuries I would be hesitant to go with your hypothesis. I don't think there have any link to be honest.

I'm not saying that the use of the word in schools makes a country have less scientists.

I'm just wondering if interest in science would be greater if it wasn't related to school subjects. Not everyone who is interested in science becomes a scientist. I love science and I don't even know how to do some basic division in math.

Google "I hate science", you'll probably mostly find frustrated students. If you Google it in Greek, it will probably be a Christian instead, who is upset that science goes against the Christian religion.

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05-07-2014, 10:53 AM
RE: Use of the word "science"
(05-07-2014 10:52 AM)undergroundp Wrote:  
(05-07-2014 10:41 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Well considering the disproportionate contributions from English speaking countries to the advancement of science over the last few centuries I would be hesitant to go with your hypothesis. I don't think there have any link to be honest.

I'm not saying that the use of the word in schools makes a country have less scientists.

I'm just wondering if interest in science would be greater if it wasn't related to school subjects. Not everyone who is interested in science becomes a scientist. I love science and I don't even know how to do some basic division in math.

Google "I hate science", you'll probably mostly find frustrated students. If you Google it in Greek, it will probably be a Christian instead, who is upset that science goes against the Christian religion.

Well as I elaborated on earlier I think it has far more to do with how it is taught than what it is called.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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