Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
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17-04-2014, 12:16 AM
Brick Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
I'm listening to a podcast by Kevin Smith, which deals with Batman. The common thread is looking up to a fictional character for personal strength, inspiration, etc.

He's religious, and he's had some pretty religious people on these podcasts too.

Now,

The typical response to a religious person using Jesus (or whomever) as their source of strength is "look to yourself, it's all you. no need for fictional people. you're just attaching this extra baggage that promotes irrationality, genocide. moderates make something normal which gives way to extremists."

And you can make the same argument for people who look up to comic book Superheroes. The moderates give way to the extremists - the versions or stories of the same heroes going genocidal, or insane.

In both cases, some of these people who were in really bad places, but due to looking up to idealized versions of these fictional characters, they came out on top and even go on to do work that rehabilitates people with certain issues, or just encourages people on a daily basis to be better in life.

I don't know where to go from here with this thought and analysis, so I'll just hand it off to you to hear your opinions on this whole thing.
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17-04-2014, 07:15 AM
RE: Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
(17-04-2014 12:16 AM)PoolBoyG Wrote:  I'm listening to a podcast by Kevin Smith, which deals with Batman. The common thread is looking up to a fictional character for personal strength, inspiration, etc.

He's religious, and he's had some pretty religious people on these podcasts too.

Now,

The typical response to a religious person using Jesus (or whomever) as their source of strength is "look to yourself, it's all you. no need for fictional people. you're just attaching this extra baggage that promotes irrationality, genocide. moderates make something normal which gives way to extremists."

And you can make the same argument for people who look up to comic book Superheroes. The moderates give way to the extremists - the versions or stories of the same heroes going genocidal, or insane.

In both cases, some of these people who were in really bad places, but due to looking up to idealized versions of these fictional characters, they came out on top and even go on to do work that rehabilitates people with certain issues, or just encourages people on a daily basis to be better in life.

I don't know where to go from here with this thought and analysis, so I'll just hand it off to you to hear your opinions on this whole thing.

Batman? Meh. Dodgy

Batman is just a pale shadow of Doc Savage. Now that's a guy to emulate. Yes

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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17-04-2014, 06:23 PM
RE: Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
Whatever works. Just don't start believing the idol is real or has actually made you stronger while you did nothing.

That's all. Drinking Beverage

Through profound pain comes profound knowledge.
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17-04-2014, 08:54 PM
RE: Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
For whatever we know, bill gates is batman's real life counterpart.

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20-04-2014, 04:19 AM
RE: Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
He's trying to tear down idols, since in the Bible, idolatry is a sin or something.

But emulating is a whole other thing, right? People try to emulate Jesus all the time and they idolize him. In the end they're emulating and idolizing an idea of Jesus that is basically, today, a completely fictional character far from what he could have been originally. If you'd want to stick the good book, you'd have to hang out with a whole bunch of hobos and prostitutes if you wanna go down like Jesus the Nazarean.
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24-05-2014, 02:27 AM
RE: Using imaginary figures as sources of strength.
Bumping this because I have an extraordinary RL example of this, one which may have literally saved My life 14 years ago this coming Wednesday (05/28).

In the late '90s, at a time when I was working hard on personal upgrades (college certificate in business, IT certifications, and a decent-paying job), My marriage started to fall apart. I had spent many years supporting My ex, but when I decided to start working on My own dreams, Whatisname didn't like it.

For whatever reason, I found a kindred spirit in the Dragonlance character Raistlin Majere and wrote out a lot of the hurt and anger as conversations with him. The main thing I saw in him was the willpower to keep going and to confront fear head-on, and he -- or I, role-playing him on paper -- could say things to Myself that I previously couldn't even think.

Shortly thereafter I met a woman who quickly became My best friend. After reading the heart of My DL collection (Soulforge, Chronicles and Legends), she also started writing dialogues with Raistlin and shared her notes with Me. (I can't remember if she knew of the writing I had been doing, or if this happened independently.)

Whatisname took an instant disliking to my female friend, and the last few months of the relationship were a cloud of depression, psychological abuse, and general unpleasantness. It all came to a head one May night, when Whatsisname cornered Me in a room I had adopted as a study. In the course of his ranting he threatened to kill himself, but only after he killed My friend.

An instant later, I heard a Raistlin-like whisper in My ear, telling Me to get out of there.

And I did, that very night -- Packed everything I could carry, and jumped into a cab with my daughter and the cat. When the Master of Past and Present tells you to drop everything and run for it, you listen. I can't tell you whether the whisper I heard was real or imagined, but heeding it was the best decision I have ever made: I still believe, after all these years, that I wouldn't have survived another night in that house.

I think this weird little tale qualifies as "in a really bad place but came out on top." Thumbsup
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