Warm blooded fish
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18-05-2015, 10:44 AM
Warm blooded fish
I work as a process engineer and a good portion of my life has been spent designing counter current heat exchangers for the beverage industry, amazing to me that this fish does the same thing with it's blood flow in and out of its gills. We call them reclaimers, some of the most efficient heat exchangers in a beverage processing facility.
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18-05-2015, 10:46 AM
Warm blooded fish
Biker, good idea! I read its popular in Hawaii....good enough reason for a trip?
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18-05-2015, 11:05 AM
RE: Warm blooded fish
LOL

Like you need a REASON to go to Hawaii....

...

Smile

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The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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18-05-2015, 11:20 AM
Warm blooded fish
Thump, what else? Horizontal gene transfer?
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18-05-2015, 05:59 PM
RE: Warm blooded fish
So, help me understand…

Ocean fish like the Opah spawn high numbers of eggs each year, upwards of 50 million eggs per female per season. The males no doubt release significantly higher numbers of sperm cells. We are talking hundreds of millions of sperm cells. Obviously the vast majority of these eggs and sperm cells do not make it to reproductive age fish. Lets say that a random mutation happens during the formation of one of these sperm cells. The chances of it fertilizing an egg are very slim and the chances of that fish surviving to adulthood are very slim. Now lets guess how many random mutations are required to create the blood vessel arrangement to allow the Opah to keep its blood warm? I’d guess its a lot? These seem pretty significant odds, is this what we think actually happened to develop this apparatus from a cold blooded ancestor?
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18-05-2015, 06:13 PM
RE: Warm blooded fish
(18-05-2015 05:59 PM)Dan Wrote:  So, help me understand…

Ocean fish like the Opah spawn high numbers of eggs each year, upwards of 50 million eggs per female per season. The males no doubt release significantly higher numbers of sperm cells. We are talking hundreds of millions of sperm cells. Obviously the vast majority of these eggs and sperm cells do not make it to reproductive age fish. Lets say that a random mutation happens during the formation of one of these sperm cells. The chances of it fertilizing an egg are very slim and the chances of that fish surviving to adulthood are very slim. Now lets guess how many random mutations are required to create the blood vessel arrangement to allow the Opah to keep its blood warm? I’d guess its a lot? These seem pretty significant odds, is this what we think actually happened to develop this apparatus from a cold blooded ancestor?

You're making the assumption that it's a recent development, and it evolved from, instead of the other way around....

It could be an old species, from which others developed.......

I dunno....

I wasn't there for the whole play......

I just walked in....

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The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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18-05-2015, 07:13 PM
Warm blooded fish
Not recent...Wikipedia says its been around since the late Miocene
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18-05-2015, 07:29 PM (This post was last modified: 18-05-2015 09:06 PM by Dan.)
Warm blooded fish
That could be 20 million years with no evo?
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18-05-2015, 10:26 PM
RE: Warm blooded fish
(18-05-2015 07:29 PM)Dan Wrote:  That could be 20 million years with no evo?

If there are no environmental pressures on that species, if it fits into it's evolutionary niche incredibly well, it could very well have seen no significant change for a very long time.

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19-05-2015, 04:38 AM
Warm blooded fish
So, I'm just understanding this for the first time. The genetic mutations that bring about change must happen in the eggs or the sperm? I guess if dna in any other cell mutated it wouldn't be passed along. So gamete formation is the only place the mutations that matter happen?
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