Washington Redskins name controversy
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01-11-2014, 04:24 PM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(01-11-2014 03:19 PM)Drunkin Druid Wrote:  There's something else. I notice that a lot of Americans still call Natives Indians. That's not politically correct up here. A Native friend of mine tells me that an Indian is a Native that is trouble. Kinda like Chris rocks nigger I guess. Anyway my point is is the Cleveland Indians acceptable?

It's not a politically correct term here. It's just more boarderline. The term Indians isn't given much grief because their logo is the more disturbing part of the team. But native american is far more used than Indian in general places now.

As far as I'm considered through, I think the term Native American's is still pretty unfitting and has skewed verbiage to me. The terms of natives, indigenous peoples, or aboriginal peoples(though most people assume It's always the Australians when used) are far better to me. I am not along the lines of most people, I would even go and say still using the term German has inaccuracy that doesn't have merit remaining.

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01-11-2014, 08:21 PM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(01-11-2014 04:24 PM)ClydeLee Wrote:  
(01-11-2014 03:19 PM)Drunkin Druid Wrote:  There's something else. I notice that a lot of Americans still call Natives Indians. That's not politically correct up here. A Native friend of mine tells me that an Indian is a Native that is trouble. Kinda like Chris rocks nigger I guess. Anyway my point is is the Cleveland Indians acceptable?

It's not a politically correct term here. It's just more boarderline. The term Indians isn't given much grief because their logo is the more disturbing part of the team. But native american is far more used than Indian in general places now.

As far as I'm considered through, I think the term Native American's is still pretty unfitting and has skewed verbiage to me. The terms of natives, indigenous peoples, or aboriginal peoples(though most people assume It's always the Australians when used) are far better to me. I am not along the lines of most people, I would even go and say still using the term German has inaccuracy that doesn't have merit remaining.
Native can be confusing when spoken. I'm a native to Canada but not aboriginal. I'm a native but my friend I spoke of is Native so it kinda works when written. Many of these terms can be a little confusing. That's why I think the best term is First Nations.
As for the Cleveland Indians I never really considered the logo as a problem. It just a little cartoon "Indian." But I suppose that could be offensive. Something always is to someone. I can't help but wonder now.. Is the Chicago Blackhawks logo offensive? Is the Minnesota Vikings logo offencive to Scandinavians. What about that little fighting Leprechaun at Notre dame? Ok those might be a little silly. But there's a point there somewhere I'm sure..
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01-11-2014, 08:25 PM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(28-10-2014 04:33 PM)davidh Wrote:  I know a lot of people are in favor of not changing the name of the Washington Redskins. What's the argument to not change the name, which is essentially a racial slur? The only one I can think of is the cost to re-brand everything? Others?

I am actually taking a native american history class at the moment, and here is a segment of a paper I presented on this very thing..

Native American places, names, and words can be found interwoven into US culture, places, and things. For example consider the following:

1) Over half of the state names of the United States are derived from Native American people, names, and words. To include; Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas’s, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin.

2) Many city names within the United States are derived from Native American sources, and make up an exhaustive list. As an example I will list 10; Pensacola, Tallahassee, Miami, Tampa, Chicago, Peoria, Topeka, Baton Rouge, Biloxi and Pascagoula.

3) Many rivers, lakes, and mountains within the United States have names that were derived from Native American sources. As an example I will list 10; Kawishiwi River, Lake Bemidji, Minnehaha Creek, Minnesota River, Mississippi River, Nemadji River, Sauk River, Watab River, Lake Winnibigoshish and Us-kab-wan-ka River.

4) Many automobiles sold in the United States have names that are derived from Native American sources. As an example I will list three; Pontiac automotive brand, Jeep Cherokee, and Jeep Comanche.

5) Some American sports teams have names derived from Native American sources as well. As an example I will list 10; Kansas city chiefs (NFL), Washington Redskins (NFL), Atlanta Braves (MLB), Cleveland Indians (MLB), Atlanta Hawks (NBA), Buffalo Braves (NBA), Golden State Warriors (NBA), Chicago Blackhawks (NHL), Burlington chiefs (Lacrosse), and Six Nations Rebels (Lacrosse).

Some Native Americans object to the use of their tribe as the name of a sports team as indicated by a statement from the National Congress of American Indians. “Indian sports brands used by professional teams were born in an era when racism and bigotry were accepted by the dominant culture. These brands which have grown to become multi-million dollar franchises were established at a time when the practice of using racial epithets and slurs as marketing slogans were a common practice among white owners seeking to capitalize on cultural superiority and racial tensions. Over the last fifty years a ground swell of support has mounted to bring an end to the era of racist and harmful “Indian” mascots in sports and popular culture. Today, that support is stronger than ever. Rooted in the civil rights movement, the quest for racial equality among American Indian and Alaska Native people began well before the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) established a campaign in 1968 to bring an end to negative and harmful stereotypes in the media and popular culture. While these advances have been positive, equality still remains elusive in everyday life for Native peoples” (NCAI 1).

It is easy for the majority to scoff at the Native American Indians being offended by the usage of their cultural words for team branding, and profiteering. This is not a new phenomenon in the world we live in past and present. The majority has long oppressed the minority, and is quick to forget that the rights of the many, do not outweigh the rights of the few. I am not a fan of any professional sports, and thus I do not have a personal interest in the debate. However, as an intelligent, educated, and empathetic person, I can understand their perspective. I am sure that the majority of Americans, which at this moment happen to be Caucasian, would be offended if a new sports team was called the Dallas Crackers, or perhaps the Tennessee Rednecks, or even the Dallas Delusional Christians team. I have long said that perspective is everything in life, maybe more people need to practice that.


Works cited:


“NCAI Releases Report on History and Legacy of Washington’s Harmful ‘Indian’ Sports Mascot.” NCAI.org. National Congress of American Indians, 10 Oct. 2013. Web. 30 Oct. 2014.

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01-11-2014, 08:44 PM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
When the Redskins came to play Arizona in Glendale ....

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/1...5420141013

Quote:Navajo Nation leader stirs controversy sitting with NFL Redskins owner

Quote:(Reuters) - The president of the largest Native American tribe in the United States raised eyebrows on the weekend when he sat with the owner of the Washington Redskins and wore a cap bearing the NFL team's logo during a game in Arizona.

Kind of hard to miss the message being sent there.

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01-11-2014, 08:46 PM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(01-11-2014 08:44 PM)Minimalist Wrote:  When the Redskins came to play Arizona in Glendale ....

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/1...5420141013

Quote:Navajo Nation leader stirs controversy sitting with NFL Redskins owner

Quote:(Reuters) - The president of the largest Native American tribe in the United States raised eyebrows on the weekend when he sat with the owner of the Washington Redskins and wore a cap bearing the NFL team's logo during a game in Arizona.

Kind of hard to miss the message being sent there.

They have also had many Native Americans at their home games this year. Like I keep saying most people and even most NA's don't care or like the name.

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01-11-2014, 08:47 PM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(01-11-2014 08:25 PM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  
(28-10-2014 04:33 PM)davidh Wrote:  I know a lot of people are in favor of not changing the name of the Washington Redskins. What's the argument to not change the name, which is essentially a racial slur? The only one I can think of is the cost to re-brand everything? Others?

I am actually taking a native american history class at the moment, and here is a segment of a paper I presented on this very thing..

Native American places, names, and words can be found interwoven into US culture, places, and things. For example consider the following:

1) Over half of the state names of the United States are derived from Native American people, names, and words. To include; Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas’s, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin.

2) Many city names within the United States are derived from Native American sources, and make up an exhaustive list. As an example I will list 10; Pensacola, Tallahassee, Miami, Tampa, Chicago, Peoria, Topeka, Baton Rouge, Biloxi and Pascagoula.

3) Many rivers, lakes, and mountains within the United States have names that were derived from Native American sources. As an example I will list 10; Kawishiwi River, Lake Bemidji, Minnehaha Creek, Minnesota River, Mississippi River, Nemadji River, Sauk River, Watab River, Lake Winnibigoshish and Us-kab-wan-ka River.

4) Many automobiles sold in the United States have names that are derived from Native American sources. As an example I will list three; Pontiac automotive brand, Jeep Cherokee, and Jeep Comanche.

5) Some American sports teams have names derived from Native American sources as well. As an example I will list 10; Kansas city chiefs (NFL), Washington Redskins (NFL), Atlanta Braves (MLB), Cleveland Indians (MLB), Atlanta Hawks (NBA), Buffalo Braves (NBA), Golden State Warriors (NBA), Chicago Blackhawks (NHL), Burlington chiefs (Lacrosse), and Six Nations Rebels (Lacrosse).

Some Native Americans object to the use of their tribe as the name of a sports team as indicated by a statement from the National Congress of American Indians. “Indian sports brands used by professional teams were born in an era when racism and bigotry were accepted by the dominant culture. These brands which have grown to become multi-million dollar franchises were established at a time when the practice of using racial epithets and slurs as marketing slogans were a common practice among white owners seeking to capitalize on cultural superiority and racial tensions. Over the last fifty years a ground swell of support has mounted to bring an end to the era of racist and harmful “Indian” mascots in sports and popular culture. Today, that support is stronger than ever. Rooted in the civil rights movement, the quest for racial equality among American Indian and Alaska Native people began well before the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) established a campaign in 1968 to bring an end to negative and harmful stereotypes in the media and popular culture. While these advances have been positive, equality still remains elusive in everyday life for Native peoples” (NCAI 1).

It is easy for the majority to scoff at the Native American Indians being offended by the usage of their cultural words for team branding, and profiteering. This is not a new phenomenon in the world we live in past and present. The majority has long oppressed the minority, and is quick to forget that the rights of the many, do not outweigh the rights of the few. I am not a fan of any professional sports, and thus I do not have a personal interest in the debate. However, as an intelligent, educated, and empathetic person, I can understand their perspective. I am sure that the majority of Americans, which at this moment happen to be Caucasian, would be offended if a new sports team was called the Dallas Crackers, or perhaps the Tennessee Rednecks, or even the Dallas Delusional Christians team. I have long said that perspective is everything in life, maybe more people need to practice that.


Works cited:


“NCAI Releases Report on History and Legacy of Washington’s Harmful ‘Indian’ Sports Mascot.” NCAI.org. National Congress of American Indians, 10 Oct. 2013. Web. 30 Oct. 2014.

Smartass

Interesting.
A couple of things.
Isn't Baton Rouge French for red stick?
I think it would be funny as hell if there was a Dallas Crackers. Maybe the Houston Honkies?
And I don't particularly see a problem with redneck either. I come from Newfoundland and live in Alberta. I've been surrounded by rednecks all my life. In fact I think I might be one.
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02-11-2014, 08:31 AM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(01-11-2014 08:47 PM)Drunkin Druid Wrote:  
(01-11-2014 08:25 PM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  I am actually taking a native american history class at the moment, and here is a segment of a paper I presented on this very thing..

Native American places, names, and words can be found interwoven into US culture, places, and things. For example consider the following:

1) Over half of the state names of the United States are derived from Native American people, names, and words. To include; Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas’s, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin.

2) Many city names within the United States are derived from Native American sources, and make up an exhaustive list. As an example I will list 10; Pensacola, Tallahassee, Miami, Tampa, Chicago, Peoria, Topeka, Baton Rouge, Biloxi and Pascagoula.

3) Many rivers, lakes, and mountains within the United States have names that were derived from Native American sources. As an example I will list 10; Kawishiwi River, Lake Bemidji, Minnehaha Creek, Minnesota River, Mississippi River, Nemadji River, Sauk River, Watab River, Lake Winnibigoshish and Us-kab-wan-ka River.

4) Many automobiles sold in the United States have names that are derived from Native American sources. As an example I will list three; Pontiac automotive brand, Jeep Cherokee, and Jeep Comanche.

5) Some American sports teams have names derived from Native American sources as well. As an example I will list 10; Kansas city chiefs (NFL), Washington Redskins (NFL), Atlanta Braves (MLB), Cleveland Indians (MLB), Atlanta Hawks (NBA), Buffalo Braves (NBA), Golden State Warriors (NBA), Chicago Blackhawks (NHL), Burlington chiefs (Lacrosse), and Six Nations Rebels (Lacrosse).

Some Native Americans object to the use of their tribe as the name of a sports team as indicated by a statement from the National Congress of American Indians. “Indian sports brands used by professional teams were born in an era when racism and bigotry were accepted by the dominant culture. These brands which have grown to become multi-million dollar franchises were established at a time when the practice of using racial epithets and slurs as marketing slogans were a common practice among white owners seeking to capitalize on cultural superiority and racial tensions. Over the last fifty years a ground swell of support has mounted to bring an end to the era of racist and harmful “Indian” mascots in sports and popular culture. Today, that support is stronger than ever. Rooted in the civil rights movement, the quest for racial equality among American Indian and Alaska Native people began well before the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) established a campaign in 1968 to bring an end to negative and harmful stereotypes in the media and popular culture. While these advances have been positive, equality still remains elusive in everyday life for Native peoples” (NCAI 1).

It is easy for the majority to scoff at the Native American Indians being offended by the usage of their cultural words for team branding, and profiteering. This is not a new phenomenon in the world we live in past and present. The majority has long oppressed the minority, and is quick to forget that the rights of the many, do not outweigh the rights of the few. I am not a fan of any professional sports, and thus I do not have a personal interest in the debate. However, as an intelligent, educated, and empathetic person, I can understand their perspective. I am sure that the majority of Americans, which at this moment happen to be Caucasian, would be offended if a new sports team was called the Dallas Crackers, or perhaps the Tennessee Rednecks, or even the Dallas Delusional Christians team. I have long said that perspective is everything in life, maybe more people need to practice that.


Works cited:


“NCAI Releases Report on History and Legacy of Washington’s Harmful ‘Indian’ Sports Mascot.” NCAI.org. National Congress of American Indians, 10 Oct. 2013. Web. 30 Oct. 2014.

Smartass

Interesting.
A couple of things.
Isn't Baton Rouge French for red stick?
I think it would be funny as hell if there was a Dallas Crackers. Maybe the Houston Honkies?
And I don't particularly see a problem with redneck either. I come from Newfoundland and live in Alberta. I've been surrounded by rednecks all my life. In fact I think I might be one.

Smile

I have zero personal interest in the whole debate as I don't watch sports, never have, and could care less if it all disappeared to morrow. But it was an assignment for class so I did some research. The Baton rouge is on the list, it had the explanation next to each one. Here is what it said and the link I used.

Baton Rouge - meaning 'red stick,' in French; a red stick was used by area Native Americans to mark the boundaries of tribal territory

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pla...can_origin

Drooling

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02-11-2014, 11:06 AM
RE: Washington Redskins name controversy
(02-11-2014 08:31 AM)goodwithoutgod Wrote:  
(01-11-2014 08:47 PM)Drunkin Druid Wrote:  Interesting.
A couple of things.
Isn't Baton Rouge French for red stick?
I think it would be funny as hell if there was a Dallas Crackers. Maybe the Houston Honkies?
And I don't particularly see a problem with redneck either. I come from Newfoundland and live in Alberta. I've been surrounded by rednecks all my life. In fact I think I might be one.

Smile

I have zero personal interest in the whole debate as I don't watch sports, never have, and could care less if it all disappeared to morrow. But it was an assignment for class so I did some research. The Baton rouge is on the list, it had the explanation next to each one. Here is what it said and the link I used.

Baton Rouge - meaning 'red stick,' in French; a red stick was used by area Native Americans to mark the boundaries of tribal territory

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pla...can_origin

Drooling
Ah, I see. I was under the impression that you were claiming Baton Rouge as a Native word. I get it now. Indeed interesting.
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