Poll: Were you once religious?
Yes, I used to believe once.
No, I never did.
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Were you once a believer?
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09-06-2012, 01:20 PM (This post was last modified: 09-06-2012 01:26 PM by Atothetheist.)
RE: Were you once a believer?
(09-06-2012 08:39 AM)Arman Wrote:  
(09-06-2012 05:49 AM)morondog Wrote:  Wow that's pretty hectic. How did you lose your faith? Was it through talking to people on the internet or... well you said you like physics, did you study it? Is that what made you rethink? Welcome to the forum Smile
It was pretty much due to both the reasons you mentioned and several others along with it. That's a long story, I suppose.

I was really enchanted by these alleged 'scientific miracles' in the Qur'an when I first got to know about them. Alongside I was attracted to popular science, and my imaginative mind would often try to relate cutting-edge physics with Qur'anic verses with the vaguest of meanings. Tongue As I was science-oriented, and also due to the fact that I was gradually being exposed to the flaws in the arguments of Zakir Naik and Harun Yahya, I started condemning Creationism, and tried to uphold a sort of Guided Evolution(or some aspects of Intelligent Design). It instantaneously occurred to me that these things only make sense if we consider the Qur'an to be semi-allegorical. Meanwhile, I got familiar with the problem of Fine-tuning, the first cause argument, Pascal's Wager, Argument from Design, Argument from morality, etc and of course, let's not forget the God-of-the-gaps Argument Drooling. That's an essential equipment for theists. Armed with the Qur'anic argument for God's existence and other philosophical arguments, I made the case for a semi-allegorical Qur'an. I used to challenge people around to somehow prove my arguments wrong, and this was perhaps the root cause of my disbelief later on. For the first time, I started to know about the other side of the argument as well. For example, the idea that the first cause argument was to be demolished by spontaneous Quantum Fluctuations, shook my important foundation laid by God-of-the-gaps argument. Step-by-step I realized the fallacy of this argument from incredulity, Pascal's Wager, Argument From Morality, Ontological and Teleological Arguments for God, and a few others. As I was becoming more self-conscious and skeptical, I rejected all anecdotal evidence, pareidolia and similar garbage. Rather, arguments against God made more sense to me. One thing that must be mentioned here is that I wasn't familiar with all these terms. I simply understood the concepts, and thought up many of these things in my mind on my own. The empirical arguments against God, the paradox in his attributes, problem of hell, argument from free will and others caused quite a stir inside me. As I got to know more about the universe, the apparent 'illusion' of design, the Qur'an seemed quite a flimsy evidence for God's existence. At this point, I became all lost in my thoughts. Given how religious I were back then, these long-held beliefs I had, all the love I had for God(surprisingly, I just wanted God after death, not heaven) - you can barely imagine the storm inside my mind that was about to blow away the idea of a God. But I did not stop there. I gradually started reading books advocating atheism (against my will), realized that almost all of the arguments that I made in my mind as a case against God, were already thought up by people over the centuries. That was a sort of support for my half-dead mind - I became aware that I was not the only 'fool' in the world lol Smile. Being good for only the fear of eternal damnation, is not humanity at all. I was able to stand back again, but this time, as a skeptic! If I ever find a valid reason to believe in God again, that would surely be sort of a deistic one, not the ones we are accustomed to, the one that tortures its imperfect creation infinitely long for finite mistakes in finite time. the ones that make the least sense. This is one life I have, and I want to savour ever bits of it - in the depths of knowledge, not ignorance...
Always a nice thing to see an ex muslim here. I was raised Catholic (Fundamentalist) so I am not well versed in the Islamic faith, maybe you'll be a nice counter to Internet Mullah.

Anyways welcome aboard SS Godless... Or is it SS Science?

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09-06-2012, 05:57 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
(09-06-2012 01:20 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  
(09-06-2012 08:39 AM)Arman Wrote:  It was pretty much due to both the reasons you mentioned and several others along with it. That's a long story, I suppose.

I was really enchanted by these alleged 'scientific miracles' in the Qur'an when I first got to know about them. Alongside I was attracted to popular science, and my imaginative mind would often try to relate cutting-edge physics with Qur'anic verses with the vaguest of meanings. Tongue As I was science-oriented, and also due to the fact that I was gradually being exposed to the flaws in the arguments of Zakir Naik and Harun Yahya, I started condemning Creationism, and tried to uphold a sort of Guided Evolution(or some aspects of Intelligent Design). It instantaneously occurred to me that these things only make sense if we consider the Qur'an to be semi-allegorical. Meanwhile, I got familiar with the problem of Fine-tuning, the first cause argument, Pascal's Wager, Argument from Design, Argument from morality, etc and of course, let's not forget the God-of-the-gaps Argument Drooling. That's an essential equipment for theists. Armed with the Qur'anic argument for God's existence and other philosophical arguments, I made the case for a semi-allegorical Qur'an. I used to challenge people around to somehow prove my arguments wrong, and this was perhaps the root cause of my disbelief later on. For the first time, I started to know about the other side of the argument as well. For example, the idea that the first cause argument was to be demolished by spontaneous Quantum Fluctuations, shook my important foundation laid by God-of-the-gaps argument. Step-by-step I realized the fallacy of this argument from incredulity, Pascal's Wager, Argument From Morality, Ontological and Teleological Arguments for God, and a few others. As I was becoming more self-conscious and skeptical, I rejected all anecdotal evidence, pareidolia and similar garbage. Rather, arguments against God made more sense to me. One thing that must be mentioned here is that I wasn't familiar with all these terms. I simply understood the concepts, and thought up many of these things in my mind on my own. The empirical arguments against God, the paradox in his attributes, problem of hell, argument from free will and others caused quite a stir inside me. As I got to know more about the universe, the apparent 'illusion' of design, the Qur'an seemed quite a flimsy evidence for God's existence. At this point, I became all lost in my thoughts. Given how religious I were back then, these long-held beliefs I had, all the love I had for God(surprisingly, I just wanted God after death, not heaven) - you can barely imagine the storm inside my mind that was about to blow away the idea of a God. But I did not stop there. I gradually started reading books advocating atheism (against my will), realized that almost all of the arguments that I made in my mind as a case against God, were already thought up by people over the centuries. That was a sort of support for my half-dead mind - I became aware that I was not the only 'fool' in the world lol Smile. Being good for only the fear of eternal damnation, is not humanity at all. I was able to stand back again, but this time, as a skeptic! If I ever find a valid reason to believe in God again, that would surely be sort of a deistic one, not the ones we are accustomed to, the one that tortures its imperfect creation infinitely long for finite mistakes in finite time. the ones that make the least sense. This is one life I have, and I want to savour ever bits of it - in the depths of knowledge, not ignorance...
Always a nice thing to see an ex muslim here. I was raised Catholic (Fundamentalist) so I am not well versed in the Islamic faith, maybe you'll be a nice counter to Internet Mullah.

Anyways welcome aboard SS Godless... Or is it SS Science?


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10-06-2012, 01:49 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
(09-06-2012 05:57 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  
(09-06-2012 01:20 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  Always a nice thing to see an ex muslim here. I was raised Catholic (Fundamentalist) so I am not well versed in the Islamic faith, maybe you'll be a nice counter to Internet Mullah.

Anyways welcome aboard SS Godless... Or is it SS Science?


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Undecided

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11-06-2012, 01:26 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
(09-06-2012 01:20 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  
(09-06-2012 08:39 AM)Arman Wrote:  It was pretty much due to both the reasons you mentioned and several others along with it. That's a long story, I suppose.

I was really enchanted by these alleged 'scientific miracles' in the Qur'an when I first got to know about them. Alongside I was attracted to popular science, and my imaginative mind would often try to relate cutting-edge physics with Qur'anic verses with the vaguest of meanings. Tongue As I was science-oriented, and also due to the fact that I was gradually being exposed to the flaws in the arguments of Zakir Naik and Harun Yahya, I started condemning Creationism, and tried to uphold a sort of Guided Evolution(or some aspects of Intelligent Design). It instantaneously occurred to me that these things only make sense if we consider the Qur'an to be semi-allegorical. Meanwhile, I got familiar with the problem of Fine-tuning, the first cause argument, Pascal's Wager, Argument from Design, Argument from morality, etc and of course, let's not forget the God-of-the-gaps Argument Drooling. That's an essential equipment for theists. Armed with the Qur'anic argument for God's existence and other philosophical arguments, I made the case for a semi-allegorical Qur'an. I used to challenge people around to somehow prove my arguments wrong, and this was perhaps the root cause of my disbelief later on. For the first time, I started to know about the other side of the argument as well. For example, the idea that the first cause argument was to be demolished by spontaneous Quantum Fluctuations, shook my important foundation laid by God-of-the-gaps argument. Step-by-step I realized the fallacy of this argument from incredulity, Pascal's Wager, Argument From Morality, Ontological and Teleological Arguments for God, and a few others. As I was becoming more self-conscious and skeptical, I rejected all anecdotal evidence, pareidolia and similar garbage. Rather, arguments against God made more sense to me. One thing that must be mentioned here is that I wasn't familiar with all these terms. I simply understood the concepts, and thought up many of these things in my mind on my own. The empirical arguments against God, the paradox in his attributes, problem of hell, argument from free will and others caused quite a stir inside me. As I got to know more about the universe, the apparent 'illusion' of design, the Qur'an seemed quite a flimsy evidence for God's existence. At this point, I became all lost in my thoughts. Given how religious I were back then, these long-held beliefs I had, all the love I had for God(surprisingly, I just wanted God after death, not heaven) - you can barely imagine the storm inside my mind that was about to blow away the idea of a God. But I did not stop there. I gradually started reading books advocating atheism (against my will), realized that almost all of the arguments that I made in my mind as a case against God, were already thought up by people over the centuries. That was a sort of support for my half-dead mind - I became aware that I was not the only 'fool' in the world lol Smile. Being good for only the fear of eternal damnation, is not humanity at all. I was able to stand back again, but this time, as a skeptic! If I ever find a valid reason to believe in God again, that would surely be sort of a deistic one, not the ones we are accustomed to, the one that tortures its imperfect creation infinitely long for finite mistakes in finite time. the ones that make the least sense. This is one life I have, and I want to savour ever bits of it - in the depths of knowledge, not ignorance...
Always a nice thing to see an ex muslim here. I was raised Catholic (Fundamentalist) so I am not well versed in the Islamic faith, maybe you'll be a nice counter to Internet Mullah.

Anyways welcome aboard SS Godless... Or is it SS Science?
I haven't revealed myself as an apostate in public yet, as you might guess the devastating effect it might have on me and my family. A muslim society is really difficult to deal with.

And yeah... SS Science please! Big Grin
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11-06-2012, 07:13 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
I had to vote "Yes", just for the simple fact that all of my earliest memories are of always going to church, memorizing bible verses since the age of 3, participating in plays, ministries, choir, etc. Forcing myself to not think beyond what the bible said or question god's existence, were just pure evil thoughts! smh How sad is that? So, at 26 I decided to break myself free from the chains of ignorance & become a born again Atheist. Smile
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11-06-2012, 07:35 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
(11-06-2012 01:26 PM)Arman Wrote:  
(09-06-2012 01:20 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  Always a nice thing to see an ex muslim here. I was raised Catholic (Fundamentalist) so I am not well versed in the Islamic faith, maybe you'll be a nice counter to Internet Mullah.

Anyways welcome aboard SS Godless... Or is it SS Science?
I haven't revealed myself as an apostate in public yet, as you might guess the devastating effect it might have on me and my family. A muslim society is really difficult to deal with.

And yeah... SS Science please! Big Grin
Well... I guess that's reasonable. I am very interested to know about the muslim society in depth.... I have a very strong feeling you will provide us with some intresting dicussions and insights.

Sorry to ask a question right off the bat, but what denomination were you (Sunni, Shiite? Etc?)

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11-06-2012, 07:54 PM (This post was last modified: 11-06-2012 08:10 PM by GirlyMan.)
RE: Were you once a believer?
(10-06-2012 01:49 PM)Atothetheist Wrote:  
(09-06-2012 05:57 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  SS [Image: null.png] Big Grin
Undecided

Nice. Thumbsup

(09-06-2012 03:47 AM)Arman Wrote:  I used to be one of the most religious muslims amongst my friends. I found myself on the net, advocating Islam all day long, and simply abhorred the notion of atheism. Life seemed to be absolutely pointless without a 'God'. Surprisingly, life seems so more meaningful today without a God, and I am glad that I've changed so much.

Weird, huh?

(11-06-2012 01:26 PM)Arman Wrote:  I haven't revealed myself as an apostate in public yet, as you might guess the devastating effect it might have on me and my family. A muslim society is really difficult to deal with.

Pretty sure I'd seriously consider keeping my metaphysics to myself if I was embedded in a highly religious, metaphysically-sensitive environment. ... "Don't ask, don't tell." is awful as a policy for precluding military service based on gender preference, but that don't mean it still ain't generally a good rule of thumb. ... You can always vent anonymously here. Wink

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17-06-2012, 07:25 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
I was fortunate to have atheists as parents, so I was never indoctrinated with any form of religion. I have always been an atheist.

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18-06-2012, 08:55 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
Not really. My parents pissed me off with their religion at a much too early age that I never took to any belief.

She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together. - Huck Finn.
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19-06-2012, 12:30 PM
RE: Were you once a believer?
My mother is catholic and I used to go to church with her when I was younger. I used to believe in God.

As I got older I started to see things different.
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