What Did You Learn Today?
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02-10-2016, 08:08 AM (This post was last modified: 02-10-2016 09:14 AM by Vera.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About galactic tick* day

“We humans spend a lot of time celebrating the procession of Earth around the Sun, with New Year's celebrations happening each year just to mark the occasion. But what about the fact that, even when we're standing still, we're moving around the Milky Way at roughly 828,000 km/h (514,000 mph), thanks to the orbit of our poor, under-appreciated Sun?

In order to give it some love, a group of science enthusiasts have just proposed a brand new space holiday called Galactic Tick Day, which celebrates the path the Sun takes around our galaxy. Unfortunately, it takes the Sun anywhere between 220 million to 250 million years to complete its journey, so to make it a little more palatable, the creators of Galactic Tick Day have divided it up so that the holiday occurs roughly every 1.74 Earth years.

A galactic tick takes place every 633.7 days, or 1.74 years (the next “tick day” will be on June 26, 2018). Although this is the inaugural celebration of the proposed holiday, Sneider says today is the planet’s 235th such tick (since Sneider and Co. decided, reasonably enough, that the first Galactic Tick Day should fall on the moment when we could first look more deeply into space—the day the patent for the first telescope was filed by Hans Lippershey on October 2, 1608.) If you’re counting since Earth formed 4.3 billion years ago, approximately 2.47 billion ticks have elapsed—or 19.1 complete revolutions around the Milky Way.”


[Image: 10510_bf0377d5a3968bac5aac7a10dfff1b86_orig.gif]

And because this was as inevitable as the next cent-arcsecond of our progress around the centre of the galaxy:

"So remember, when you're feeling very small and insecure
How amazingly unlikely is your birth
And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth."






Sadly, we also learnt that the wonderful, wonderful Terry Jones has been struck with progressive aphasia Sadcryface

*My mind went someplace completely different the first time I saw this Rolleyes

EDIT: Oh, and that my deepest, darkest fear from the days of my self-imposed mental slavery has a name: apeirophobia. (The comments below are irrefutable proof that as far as intelligence is concerned, there really is bugger all down on earth. And that at our average we are one really short-sighted, self-centred species. “I'm pretty sure I could come up with limitless ideas on what I could do with that kind of time.” – you don’t even seem capable of even beginning to grasp eternity, no freaking end. Ever. EVER. But I’m sure you’ll find things to do. Drinking Beverage

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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02-10-2016, 10:06 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
That trying to install Apache and PHP on Windows 10 sucks ass. About to give up and make an Ubuntu VM.

#sigh
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02-10-2016, 10:23 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-10-2016 08:08 AM)Vera Wrote:  About galactic tick* day

“We humans spend a lot of time celebrating the procession of Earth around the Sun, with New Year's celebrations happening each year just to mark the occasion. But what about the fact that, even when we're standing still, we're moving around the Milky Way at roughly 828,000 km/h (514,000 mph), thanks to the orbit of our poor, under-appreciated Sun?

In order to give it some love, a group of science enthusiasts have just proposed a brand new space holiday called Galactic Tick Day, which celebrates the path the Sun takes around our galaxy. Unfortunately, it takes the Sun anywhere between 220 million to 250 million years to complete its journey, so to make it a little more palatable, the creators of Galactic Tick Day have divided it up so that the holiday occurs roughly every 1.74 Earth years.

A galactic tick takes place every 633.7 days, or 1.74 years (the next “tick day” will be on June 26, 2018). Although this is the inaugural celebration of the proposed holiday, Sneider says today is the planet’s 235th such tick (since Sneider and Co. decided, reasonably enough, that the first Galactic Tick Day should fall on the moment when we could first look more deeply into space—the day the patent for the first telescope was filed by Hans Lippershey on October 2, 1608.) If you’re counting since Earth formed 4.3 billion years ago, approximately 2.47 billion ticks have elapsed—or 19.1 complete revolutions around the Milky Way.”


[Image: 10510_bf0377d5a3968bac5aac7a10dfff1b86_orig.gif]

And because this was as inevitable as the next cent-arcsecond of our progress around the centre of the galaxy:

"So remember, when you're feeling very small and insecure
How amazingly unlikely is your birth
And pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space
'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth."






Sadly, we also learnt that the wonderful, wonderful Terry Jones has been struck with progressive aphasia Sadcryface

*My mind went someplace completely different the first time I saw this Rolleyes

EDIT: Oh, and that my deepest, darkest fear from the days of my self-imposed mental slavery has a name: apeirophobia. (The comments below are irrefutable proof that as far as intelligence is concerned, there really is bugger all down on earth. And that at our average we are one really short-sighted, self-centred species. “I'm pretty sure I could come up with limitless ideas on what I could do with that kind of time.” – you don’t even seem capable of even beginning to grasp eternity, no freaking end. Ever. EVER. But I’m sure you’ll find things to do. Drinking Beverage

I had completely forgotten thst Python song. Thanks for reminding me, Vera, it is terrific!

So much wisdom in Python.

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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02-10-2016, 12:45 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(02-10-2016 10:23 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  I had completely forgotten thst Python song. Thanks for reminding me, Vera, it is terrific!

So much wisdom in Python.

My pleasure! Any excuse to remind people (and myself ;-)) of a Python song. This one has always been one of my most favourite, up there with (perhaps not so wise but so chortle-worthy): [Image: laugh_mini.gif]

"When danger reared its ugly head
He bravely turned his tail and fled.
Yes, Brave Sir Robin turned about
And gallantly chickened out.

Bravely taking to his feet
He beat a very brave retreat.
Oh bravest of the brave, Sir Robin."






(Plus, it’s always good to see Neil Innes. You are probably familiar with them, but he has quite a few great pre- and post-Python songs, too. And boy, could he out-Dylan Bob and out-John Elton ;-))


Such deep wisdom:

"Let me turn you on
To the chromium swan
On the the nose of a long limousine
Even hire it for the day
It is somethin' to say
But what the hell does it mean?

I may be accused
Of bein' confused
But I'm average weight for my height
My phil-o-so-phy
Like color TV
Is all there in black and white…"





And wealth of emotion:

"If all the trees were candles
And who's to say they're not
The world would be a birthday cake
And we could eat the lot
But too many cooks can spoil the broth
And a stitch in time saves nine
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
And I'll never change my mind

A tightrope walker has a balanced mind
As well as arms and legs
But why do chickens cross the road
Not to mention layin' eggs
I guess I'll never know
Or truly understand
Anyhow its not just doorknobs
That come off in your hand."






"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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15-11-2016, 10:54 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About brinicles (and sieches). The name alone is almost as awesome as the thing itself Shy

[Image: 570780773brr.jpg]

[Image: giphy.gif]

"We’re used to seeing icicles form on tree branches and the eaves of buildings, but they can also form deep beneath the ocean, creating what’s known as a brine icicle, or brinicle.
These icy underwater tentacles are often referred to as “sea stalactites” because of their bizarre appearance, but their deadly nature has earned them another nickname: “icicles of death.”

When sea ice develops in the Arctic and Antarctic, impurities like salt are forced out, which is why ice created from seawater isn’t as salty as the water from which it’s formed.

As this salty water leaks from the sea ice, the surrounding water becomes more saline, lowering its freezing temperature and increasing its density. This prevents the water from freezing to the ice and causes it to sink.

As this cold brine reaches warmer seawater below, the water freezes around it, creating the descending tube of ice known as a brinicle.

When this sea stalactite reaches the seabed, a web of ice forms and spreads across it, freezing everything it touches — including any sea life it encounters, such as starfishand sea urchins — which is how brinicles earned themselves a reputation as "icicles of death."




"Seiches are typically caused when strong winds and rapid changes in atmospheric pressure push water from one end of a body of water to the other. When the wind stops, the water rebounds to the other side of the enclosed area. The water then continues to oscillate back and forth for hours or even days. In a similar fashion, earthquakes, tsunamis, or severe storm fronts may also cause seiches along ocean shelves and ocean harbors.

Lake Erie is known for seiches, especially when strong winds blow from southwest to northeast. In 1844, a 22-foot seiche breached a 14-foot-high sea wall killing 78 people and damming the ice to the extent that Niagara Falls temporarily stopped flowing. As recently as 2008, strong winds created waves 12 to 16 feet high in Lake Erie, leading to flooding near Buffalo, New York. Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, is also known to routinely form small seiches after the passage of afternoon squall lines during summer months."


[Image: davesandford_galesofnovembercomeearly-800x533.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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15-11-2016, 11:00 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(O_o)

Okay.. weird and creepy as fek!
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24-11-2016, 04:32 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
What puggles are Heart

[Image: enhanced-buzz-21766-1352383114-17.jpg]

[Image: enhanced-buzz-21615-1332444876-73.jpg]

[Image: 6a010535647bf3970b017d3f4a5777970c-500wi]

[Image: 6a010535647bf3970b017ee4fbcc36970d-500wi]

The proper name given to a juvenile Monotreme (i.e. either an echidna or a platypus) – specifically, the period between hatching and weaning.

Also, the garden of Eden Eel is totally reel… I mean, real Rolleyes

How's that for weird, Peebothuhul ;-)

[Image: Rpya68SusPKi4.gif]









Atlantic Garden Eels, or Garden Eels as they’re sometimes called, are some of the most appreciated animals at display in aquariums all over the world. People are stunned by their beauty, but also their odd behavior. Often times, you’ll see these eels ‘sit’ upright, with their tails partially buried in the sand. They have the ability to fully retract into their hole but they generally expose most of their body length in order to catch zooplankton that drifts by with the current.
In the wild, Garden Eels live in colonies that can comprise thousands of individuals. Each eel has its own spot and digs its own hole — they look like plants sprouting from the ocean floor, hence the name. It’s then only a matter of farming plankton. In fact, these animals rarely leave their burrows and get frightened easily which makes them very difficult to capture.


Okay, that's enough lectures no one asked for for now Rolleyes

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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26-11-2016, 09:57 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I learned that the true beauty of writing a mathematical proof is that it invites others to join the writer on an interactive adventure in clear mathematical reasoning. Hence, IMO, if math proofs are presented in a "can do", interesting, and fun way, then perhaps it can help students see how beautiful math is and engage it with curiosity, not fear.

"I'm fearful when I see people substituting fear for reason." Klaatu, from The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951)
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26-11-2016, 03:35 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
[Image: 0Rtrwxj.jpg]

I took that photo at the end of April and had no earthly clue what it was. Until now.

Turns out, that is the remaining pupa casing of a Rain Moth

[Image: sunmoth1.jpg]

Rain moth larva, often refered to by some variation of Bardee grub, live in tunnels feeding off roots until it is time to undergo metamorphosis and emerge.

The people closely associated with the namesake of female canines are suffering from a nondescript form of lunacy.
"Anti-environmentalism is like standing in front of a forest and going 'quick kill them they're coming right for us!'" - Jake Farr-Wharton, The Imaginary Friend Show.
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26-11-2016, 06:03 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(26-11-2016 03:35 PM)Free Thought Wrote:  [Image: 0Rtrwxj.jpg]

I took that photo at the end of April and had no earthly clue what it was. Until now.

Turns out, that is the remaining pupa casing of a Rain Moth

[Image: sunmoth1.jpg]

Rain moth larva, often refered to by some variation of Bardee grub, live in tunnels feeding off roots until it is time to undergo metamorphosis and emerge.

That's one big moth! Unless you have tiny hands. I'm surprised it didn't get stepped on, sitting there for 6 months. Or is it in a place where no one walks?
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