What Did You Learn Today?
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11-05-2017, 07:38 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
food cooks better when it's actually put into the oven. Provided it's turned on.

Dodgy


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

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16-05-2017, 09:08 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
A large bottle of Purell hand sanitizer (the whole damn thing) is not a clever way to get drunk and the after effects are not pretty.

Holy Censored I need a new job. I don't have enough faith in humanity left to keep losing more lol.

'Murican Canadian
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16-05-2017, 09:11 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(16-05-2017 09:08 PM)yakherder Wrote:  A large bottle of Purell hand sanitizer (the whole damn thing) is not a clever way to get drunk and the after effects are not pretty.

Holy Censored I need a new job. I don't have enough faith in humanity left to keep losing more lol.

Holy shit! My mother is an inmate in the facility where you work? Never mind...so far, as least as far as I know, she hasn't tried hand sanitizer yet. I think she hit her peak a few times with rubbing alcohol and milk cocktails...also not the best way to catch a buzz. Undecided

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF

We're all mad here. The Cheshire Cat
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16-05-2017, 09:27 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(16-05-2017 09:08 PM)yakherder Wrote:  A large bottle of Purell hand sanitizer (the whole damn thing) is not a clever way to get drunk and the after effects are not pretty.

Holy Censored I need a new job. I don't have enough faith in humanity left to keep losing more lol.

OK, it has ethanol in it, but dayamn. Does one get the Hershey Squirts® from it? Not that I'm going to try it.
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16-05-2017, 09:55 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
(16-05-2017 09:27 PM)Fireball Wrote:  
(16-05-2017 09:08 PM)yakherder Wrote:  A large bottle of Purell hand sanitizer (the whole damn thing) is not a clever way to get drunk and the after effects are not pretty.

Holy Censored I need a new job. I don't have enough faith in humanity left to keep losing more lol.

OK, it has ethanol in it, but dayamn. Does one get the Hershey Squirts® from it? Not that I'm going to try it.

He'd vomited what looked like about two litres of blood last I saw him. He was drunk though, so I guess it worked.

'Murican Canadian
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24-05-2017, 01:03 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
That, apparently, before the time of fridges (damn progress, spoiling the good ol' times, as 'twere) people used to preserve milk by dunking...

... frogs in it

And here we have the amphibian version of the Narcissus - or should I say Anurcissus? - legend Rolleyes

[Image: bce765107245418c2ecd309672d6a329.jpg]

[Image: 077ce64302a5c9700948d04ad4887740.jpg]

My most favourite (or at least funniest one. There are some stunningly beautiful frogs) is still this one, though. Most adorable hissy fit ever!


Also, about this charming (at least in photographs Rolleyes ) lil creature. Apparently, nature loves stereotypes as much as the talentless hacks I translate for a living (if you can all it that Dodgy ):

Two New Bug Species Have All-Pink Females

[Image: pink-katydid-01.jpg]

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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26-05-2017, 05:01 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
don't borrow money to friends
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30-05-2017, 09:10 AM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About crinoids, a.k.a. sea lilies and feather stars (do I love the names? Must you even ask - of course I do!)

These creatures have some history. They date back to the Ordovician period between 485.4 and 443.8 million years ago. And they were abundant, as we know by the rich fossil records they left – many thick limestone beds from the mid- to late-Paleozoic are comprised of almost all bits of crinoids. But until the discovery of living ones, they were assumed extinct.

Crinoids have the same interior system of canals ending in tube feet as the other echinoderms, as well as the same unusual ligament tissue that can alter between rigid and flaccid states, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

But unlike the other echinoderms, crinoids fasten their beautiful selves to the sea floor by way of their handy-dandy stalk. The species that keep their stalks are called sea lilies, as you can see in the photos directly below. The rest lose their stalks as they mature and can swim and float, attaching themselves with a set of small legs (called cirri); these are the feather stars.

But what really sets the crinoids apart from their relatives is their incredible feathery accouterments. The creatures are rife with tiny tube feet along their frilly arms, used to capture suspended particles of plankton and other treats from the water. They are like flowers come to life in the sea, animals so exotic to our terrestrial sensibilities that they easily elicit little gasps of “oh” and “ah” upon first encounters. (And subsequent encounters as well.) I mean look at these things, they are animals!

And to see them swim? There’s really nothing like it, as you can watch in the video at the bottom.
Heart

[Image: rnq2sbqglakkz4cwsiir.gif]

[Image: orange-white-feather-star.jpg.662x0_q70_crop-scale.jpg]

[Image: yello-sea-lily.jpg.650x0_q70_crop-smart.jpg]

[Image: yellow-feather-star.jpg]

Have I told you lately... how sad the thought that all this wondrous variety of lifeforms we have on Earth will one day disappear, when our star finally decides that "it was sun while it lasted but I think a change would do me good."

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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30-05-2017, 10:45 AM (This post was last modified: 30-05-2017 11:07 AM by Thoreauvian.)
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
I learned from a David Attenborough nature DVD that baby elephants eat the poop of adult elephants. It's like baby food for them, since it is predigested and still has lots of nutritional value.

Oh, and that bull elephant penises are about three feet long and prehensile. They chase the females around with it.

Thumbsup

(I must admit that I no longer entertain idealized notions about the natural world.)
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04-06-2017, 04:24 PM
RE: What Did You Learn Today?
About the leaning towers of pines: The strange Cook pine trees that always lean towards the equator

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"Cook pines are towering trees that were once restricted to their native home of New Caledonia, an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. Through cultivation, they have taken root across tropical, subtropical and temperate regions around the world.

The trees often have slightly tilting trunks. Scientists have now noted a bizarre pattern in their tilt: they lean south in their northern range and north in their southern range.

He and his colleagues studied 256 Cook pines scattered across five continents. They collected tree data at 18 locations between latitudes of 7 and 35° north, and 12 and 42° south. The team estimated that the trees tilt by 8.55 degrees on an average – about double the tilt of the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

The trees also slant more the further they are from the equator in both hemispheres. “It’s a shockingly distinct pattern,” says Ritter. One tree in South Australia slants at 40 degrees.


Trees normally correct for such asymmetry in their growth, but for some unknown reason the Cook pine is unable to do so, says Ritter. “We could be just dealing with an artefact of its genetics that we are seeing now when we have spread it all over the world,” he says. Alternatively, it could be an adaptation to catch more sunlight at higher latitudes.

“The tilting phenomenon is not unusual,” says Steven Warren of the US Forest Service in Utah. In 2016, he reported that the inflorescence of the yucca palm found in the US always points south, thus cutting the cost of transporting nutrients to its flowers. Some cacti lean towards the sun too, he says. However, “this is the first time I have heard of a tree doing this”, says Warren."

Thoreauvian, I also learnt last week about a frog which feeds her tadpoles her own eggs (*and* they are each deposited in a water-filled thingamajig* on tree trunks)


* Yep. That's the scientific term Dodgy

"E se non passa la tristezza con altri occhi la guarderò."
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